Criminal Defense Attorney in Wilmington Island, GA.

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If you are accused of a crime, the only thing standing between your freedom and a verdict of “guilty” is an experienced criminal defense attorney in Wilmington Island, GA.

Those who have been arrested before know that life in the legal system is no laughing matter. Aside from the imminent ramifications of fines and jail time, any goals you have of bettering yourself and advancing your life could be compromised. Without a trusted attorney by your side, you could face a lifetime of embarrassment and poor employment prospects due to a tarnished criminal record.

The good news? Dennis O’Brien and his team of experienced lawyers in Wilmington Island are ready to clear your name. By retaining the help of a criminal defense attorney early in the legal process, you have a much better chance of securing your freedom and living a life as a productive member of society.

At O’Brien Law Firm PC, our practice was founded to fight for the rights of individuals accused of or charged with a crime. Our team of legal experts is well-equipped to take even the most difficult, contentious cases. From violent felonies to DUI, there is nothing we haven’t seen and handled. As a former law enforcement officer, founding attorney Dennis O’Brien knows exactly how much a person can lose if convicted. That’s why we work tirelessly to secure a verdict that is favorable for our clients.

Regardless of how serious or minor your case may be, know that we will fight fearlessly on your behalf. You deserve zealous representation – when you hire O’Brien Law Firm PC, you will receive nothing less.

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The O’Brien Law Firm PC Difference

Many of our clients are surprised to discover that founding lawyer Dennis O’Brien was a police officer prior to his criminal defense career. As a former Field Training Officer for the Memphis Police Department, he has over two decades of knowledge and experience in the criminal justice system. Dennis truly understands the nuance and complexities involved in a criminal defense case. This rare experience gives Dennis a clear edge in any criminal defense case and gives clients priceless peace of mind when they need it the most. Unlike some criminal defense attorneys in Wilmington Island, Dennis O’Brien and his team believe that every client deserves effective, empathetic legal assistance. While some Wilmington Island criminal defense firms will take weekends off or pass along cases to paralegals, Dennis personally reviews each of his cases. There is no case too small or big for O’Brien Law Firm PC. When you hire our firm, you can rest easy knowing that we will be by your side when the going gets tough.

The OBrien Law Firm PC Difference
Here are just a few reasons why O’Brien Law Firm PC is Wilmington Island’s top choice in criminal defense:
  • Vigorous Representation
  • Fierce Dedication to Clients
  • Unmatched Experience
  • Face-to-Face Counsel
  • Prompt Response to Inquiries and Questions
  • Commitment to Defending Your Rights
  • Thorough, Effective Research and Investigation
  • Contact Us or Call: 912.704.5150
Our firm has represented hundreds of criminal defense clients
Our firm has represented hundreds of criminal defense clients in Wilmington Island and is highly qualified to take your case. Some of our specialties include:

Drug Cases in Wilmington Island, GA

When you are charged with a drug crime in Wilmington Island, it can change your life forever. Georgia imposes very strict punishments for drug offenses. The truth is, it’s hard to get your life back on track with a drug charge on your record. Your freedom and way of life could be in the hands of your criminal defense attorney. As such, you need a competent lawyer with years of experience handling drug cases. Leaving your fate in the hands of an incompetent attorney could have long-lasting effects on your family and may result in a conviction.

Consequences-for-drug-crimes

Consequences for drug crimes in Wilmington Island often include:

  • Jail
  • Prison
  • Heavy fines
  • Community service
  • Court-ordered drug and alcohol counseling
  • Probation or parole
  • Permanent criminal record

While the consequences for a drug crime in Georgia are serious, there’s reason to be hopeful: O’Brien Law Firm PC is here to fight for you. Remember – being charged with a drug crime is NOT the same thing as being convicted.

Our stellar team has represented many clients facing numerous drug-related charges. While each situation varies, one constant remains the same for clients facing drug charges: a fear of what lies ahead. At O’Brien Law Firm PC our job is to help you overcome the fear of the unknown. We do so by ensuring you understand your charges, the possible outcomes associated with those charges, and the options you need to consider from a criminal defense standpoint.

With more than a decade of experience as Wilmington Island drug crime attorneys, we have the experience and resources to defend you in court no matter what your charges may be, including:

  • Marijuana
  • Crack
  • Cocaine
  • Heroin
  • Methamphetamine
  • Ecstasy

No matter what charge you are facing, our team has the experience and resources to build a comprehensive defense strategy for your drug case in Wilmington Island, GA. Without a criminal defense attorney acting as your advocate, you could be facing very harsh penalties. Here are a few punishments you could be facing for drug crimes in Wilmington Island:

  • Schedule I or Schedule II Drug Possession
    Schedule I or Schedule II Drug Possession:

    Having less than a gram (or one milliliter for liquids) of this type of drug results in a prison term of one to three years. Having four grams or milliliter carries a term of one to eight years.

  • Schedule III, IV, or V Drug Possession
    Schedule III, IV, or V Drug Possession:

    Any substance on this list is punishable by a prison sentence of one to three years.

  • Non-Narcotic Schedule II Drug Possession
    Non-Narcotic Schedule II Drug Possession:

    If you have less than two grams or milliliters of this substance, punishments can be between one year and three years. Having up to four grams or milliliters results in a prison sentence of one to eight years.

  • Possession of Marijuana
    Possession of Marijuana:

    Those who are in possession of less than an ounce of marijuana are subject to a jail sentence of up to 12 months. Fines may be no more than $1,000. Possession of more than an ounce of marijuana can result in a prison term of one to 10 years.

To avoid these life-changing punishments, you must take action now. Contact O’Brien Law Firm today for a consultation about your case.

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Violent Crime Cases

Violent Crime Cases in Wilmington Island, GA

Violent crime offenses in Wilmington Island typically involve some form of bodily harm to another individual, actions committed against an individual’s will, or threatening someone with bodily harm. Aggravated violent offenses are more severe charges and often occur when a violent crime is made more serious due to circumstances like deadly weapons.

Much like serious drug cases, violent crimes create an added layer of negativity that follows the accused for the rest of their life. In these cases, even an accusation is enough to cause irreparable damage to a person’s reputation. Those convicted of a violent crime face severe penalties that can include years in a correctional facility.

Common crimes of this nature include but are not limited to:
  • Murder
  • Assault with the intent to murder
  • Vehicular homicide
  • Domestic violence
  • Assault
  • Battery
  • Kidnapping
  • Rape
  • Robbery
  • Carjacking

When you are accused of any of the above crimes, your freedom hangs in the balance. The outcome of your case will determine whether you leave the courtroom with your freedom intact or stripped away to serve time behind bars. Because the punishments for violent crimes are so extreme, you should be seeking legal counsel from a criminal defense attorney in Wilmington Island, GA, as soon as possible. As a former police officer with a long record of positive verdicts in violent crime cases, Dennis O’Brien is well equipped to represent you in court.

Having a criminal defense lawyer by your side is the best way to avoid the serious punishments associated with violent crimes. These punishments usually result in prison time if convicted and include:
Forced rape: 20 years
Armed robbery: Up to 20 years
Simple assault: Up to 12 months
Aggravated assault: 10 to 20 years
Aggravated battery: Up to 20 years
Involuntary manslaughter: One to 20 years
Vehicular homicide Up to 15 years
Murder: Life in prison or the death sentence
Zealous Representation Without Judgement

As a former police officer, Dennis O’Brien has seen the toll it takes on a person when charged with a crime. His time in law enforcement allows him to empathize with his clients who desperately need competent representation. Despite being innocent until proven guilty, accusations are scary, and conviction could be a reality. That is why you must work with a trustworthy criminal defense lawyer in Wilmington Island, GA who will work tirelessly to clear your name.

Clients choose O’Brien Law Firm because we believe in open communication, honesty, and hard work. It is not our job to act as judges for those who have been accused of crimes. Rather, our goal is to find the best defense that allows us to protect our clients’ rights and freedoms.

DUI Cases in Wilmington Island, GA

Driving under the influence (DUI) is one of the most common crimes committed in Georgia. Punishments for such a crime can be severe, and for understandable reasons – when a person operates a vehicle while they are intoxicated, they’re putting their life and the lives of others at risk.

While DUI is a serious crime that completely upend the accused’s life, the earnest desire to end drunk driving can make police officers too eager to catch a person who they believe is under the influence.

DUI Cases

The city of Wilmington Island, Georgia, has implemented severe punishments for DUI, even for first-time offenders. Individuals charged with DUI in Wilmington Island could face:

  • Very expensive fines and fees
  • Loss of license
  • Incarceration

Fortunately, if you or someone you love has been charged with DUI, there is hope. This is particularly true when the accused is administered a breath or blood test for DUI. In fact, cases that involve a breath and/or blood test are beaten daily. When you hire O’Brien Law Firm PC, we will dive deep into your DUI case in Wilmington Island and examine every angle possible for your case to be dismissed. Here are just a few questions our team will investigate:

  • Was the stop legal? If not, your case could be dismissed
  • Is there enough evidence or probable cause to arrest you? If not, Dennis O’Brien will file a pre-trial motion and will fight hard to have your case dismissed before trial.
  • Did the police read you your implied consent rights? If not, your case could be thrown out. Failure to read implied consent rights to the accused is one of the most common police errors.
  • Were your blood testing records and breathalyzer results maintained? Breath testing comes with inherent weaknesses that can create doubt in a juror’s mind.

There are numerous ways to beat a DUI case in Georgia, from unreliable field sobriety tests to inaccurate state-administered breath tests. As a veteran criminal defense lawyer in Wilmington Island, GA, Dennis O’Brien has the knowledge and experience to expose the state’s mistakes and fight for your rights. When you hire O’Brien Law Firm PC your chances of dismissal are greatly increased. When your case is dismissed, you can continue living life without the burden of a criminal record.

If you or someone you love is accused of a crime in Wilmington Island, GA, don’t leave fate up to the prosecution. Take the necessary steps to protect yourself and your family before it’s too late.

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Latest News in Wilmington Island

Delivery driver’s small gesture sends big message to Wilmington Island man

A doorbell camera capture the moment a delivery driver fixed a flag on Wilmington IslandWILMINGTON ISLAND, Ga. (WTOC) - This time of year, it’s not uncommon to see delivery drivers at Zach Weldon’s front door.“Christmas is coming around the corner so, we’ll have a bunch of stuff we’re ordering,” laughed Weldon.So, it came as no surprise when he got a notification from his Ring camera a little over a week ago.“Happen to be at the shop, heard it ring. I was expecting some ...

A doorbell camera capture the moment a delivery driver fixed a flag on Wilmington Island

WILMINGTON ISLAND, Ga. (WTOC) - This time of year, it’s not uncommon to see delivery drivers at Zach Weldon’s front door.

“Christmas is coming around the corner so, we’ll have a bunch of stuff we’re ordering,” laughed Weldon.

So, it came as no surprise when he got a notification from his Ring camera a little over a week ago.

“Happen to be at the shop, heard it ring. I was expecting some packages.” A notification he typically ignores, “normally it’s just people walking by or my flag flying in the wind.”

But on this day, he looked.

“Don’t know why I decided to look and watch it, but I did,” said Weldon, and what he saw he won’t forget..

The delivery driver, dropping off his packages, but then as he goes to leave, he pauses, and what he does next, is what caught Weldon’s eye.

“Little thing of the Amazon guy taking the time out of the day to unwrap and unravel my flag, so it was flying how it was supposed to be.”

Of course, it’s unlikely this mystery man knew Weldon was watching, or that he likes his flag just so.

“To me it’s just a big deal of, one it’s our colors, but just making sure it’s not tangled up or wrapped up or looking unsightly. I look it as clean and crisp as it can be.”

Making the gesture even more special, “being a prior service vet, it means a lot.”

Weldon, an Army Veteran, may never know why the delivery driver did it or even who he is.

“Maybe just doing it out of the goodness of his heart or maybe he’s a prior service veteran himself so he respects the flag a bit more.”

But whoever he is, “I definitely say thank you to him,” Weldon says.

Oh, and if you were wondering what was in the packages that day, “I don’t even know what it was, it wasn’t important,” laughs Weldon.

WTOC did reach out to Amazon to try and learn the identity of the delivery man that day, but we have not yet heard back.

Copyright 2021 WTOC. All rights reserved.

Tybee Island flying yellow flags as tropical system moves near the coast

TYBEE ISLAND, Ga. (WTOC) - The beaches have been catching bands of rain Monday morning and afternoon.As far as rain, the heaviest we’ve seen out here Monday came around 1:30 p.m. to 1:45 p.m. That round had some thunder and lightning, basically what you’d see during a typical pop-up thunderstorm. The sun has basically been behind the clouds all day, with some light drizzle at times too.That definitely didn’t keep folks from coming out to the beach though, especially surfers looking to take advantage of some bi...

TYBEE ISLAND, Ga. (WTOC) - The beaches have been catching bands of rain Monday morning and afternoon.

As far as rain, the heaviest we’ve seen out here Monday came around 1:30 p.m. to 1:45 p.m. That round had some thunder and lightning, basically what you’d see during a typical pop-up thunderstorm. The sun has basically been behind the clouds all day, with some light drizzle at times too.

That definitely didn’t keep folks from coming out to the beach though, especially surfers looking to take advantage of some bigger than usual waves. Surf conditions also prompted lifeguards to put out the yellow flags, letting folks know there are strong currents as well.

WTOC caught up with one family visiting from the Midwest this week who said this was their first time seeing any kind of effects of a tropical system.

“Right now it looks pretty calm, just a little bit of rain, right? Planning to hang out on Tybee Island today and just enjoy lunch and hang with the family. But yeah, we’ll see what it turns into.” “We brought the girls over about an hour ago to splash in the water before it started. And now we’re going to just hang back and see what unfolds,” said Tony Dorto who is visiting the Savannah area with family.

WTOC asked one beachcomber earlier to see if the rougher surf churned anything valuable up.

“I prefer to come out on a calm day, typically after the storm. So it’s a little hard to detect in the water, with it being rough like this. I’ve got a quarter and a dime…if I do that about 40 more times then I can pay for my parking,” said Bruce O’Donnell.

So not as successful as he would’ve liked, but still a good attitude about it.

The City of Tybee has been in close communication with Chatham Emergency Management Agency since learning about Monday’s possible tropical development. WTOC spoke with Tybee’s city manager Monday morning, who says even before the affects of this system pass, they’re already keeping a close eye on other storm development in the Atlantic.

“We’re looking at severe thunderstorm type weather hitting us here in a couple hours. So we’re also tracking another system that’s out in the Atlantic that’s tracking through the Bahamas in that area. That always keeps us concerned, but it’s a little early in the season. We hope it just dissipates,” said Gillen.

That mindset of always watching what’s next, that lasts all of hurricane season for these city leaders.

Copyright 2021 WTOC. All rights reserved.

Tybee Island businesses preparing for impact of holiday weekend crowds

TYBEE ISLAND, Ga. (WTOC) - Businesses on Tybee Island are getting ready for the hustle and bustle of crowds that are expected to turn out for Memorial Day weekend. After the subdued nature due to COVID last year, many businesses say this weekend will most likely see bigger crowds than a normal holiday weekend.Preparing is the key word here. One business owner said they are expecting the largest number of people to be out here since the pandemic started.“We’re preparing for Armageddon! That’s how it is,” ...

TYBEE ISLAND, Ga. (WTOC) - Businesses on Tybee Island are getting ready for the hustle and bustle of crowds that are expected to turn out for Memorial Day weekend. After the subdued nature due to COVID last year, many businesses say this weekend will most likely see bigger crowds than a normal holiday weekend.

Preparing is the key word here. One business owner said they are expecting the largest number of people to be out here since the pandemic started.

“We’re preparing for Armageddon! That’s how it is,” Sugar Shack owner Bruce Grosse said.

That’s how Grosse describes what they’re preparing for on Memorial Day weekend. He says business has been tough, already, as they work to keep up with the demand.

“The people are just swarming in on the beach and we’re short help,” he said.

Like many other businesses a help wanted sign is slapped on the door and now that peak season is here, Grosse says customers are understanding.

“They say they’ve been here, there or everywhere and they’ve seen the same thing,” he said.

It’ll be all hands on deck this weekend.

“Lines to the street this weekend, but we’ll be ok! It’s been a struggle for everyone,” Grosse said.

Grosse says it is wonderful to see this much business after last year, but it has been overwhelming.

“I’m having to get ice cream three days a week just to be able to handle it. We’ll go through hundreds of tubs of ice cream in a single week and still run short of ice cream,” Grosse said.

On a normal weekend, Grosse says they make about $7,000 per day. He says it is hard to tell the profit this weekend will bring in.

Tybee Island city officials say they are expecting huge crowds this Memorial Day weekend as they’ve already seen very busy weekends over the last few weeks.

Several people at the beach Thursday say they chose to come to the beach this week, so they could leave before the crowds get here on the weekend.

In fact, that was the consensus with most people. They say they have heard how busy it gets during summer holidays, so they wanted to beat the rush and save some money.

“Just to beat the crowds and as you can see, there’s a lot of people out here and the COVID thing. They want to get out of the house,” said Lonnie Gordon, visiting from Indianapolis.

“Right now, it’s not that many people and it’s not as crowded. Really, just before Memorial Day it starts to get packed, the roads get packed,” said Cheryl Haun, visiting from Pennsylvania.

A good reminder for people heading to Tybee this weekend is the parking services department encourages people to come early if they want to find parking. Any time after 11a.m. is usually a waiting game.

Copyright 2021 WTOC. All rights reserved.

Thunderbolt Mayor-Elect Dana Williams: 'We don't want to lose our sense of community'

Decades ago, the Town of Thunderbolt operated one of the busiest shrimping hubs on the east coast. In fact, so many shrimp boats lined the waterfront that one could walk to the middle of the Wilmington River on them, said Dana Williams, the town's new mayor-elect.“There were piers going out and buildings out that water from one end to the other,” said Williams, “This river was what made Thunderbolt.”Today, only remnants of that vibrant fishing industry and boastful fleet exist. The town of...

Decades ago, the Town of Thunderbolt operated one of the busiest shrimping hubs on the east coast. In fact, so many shrimp boats lined the waterfront that one could walk to the middle of the Wilmington River on them, said Dana Williams, the town's new mayor-elect.

“There were piers going out and buildings out that water from one end to the other,” said Williams, “This river was what made Thunderbolt.”

Today, only remnants of that vibrant fishing industry and boastful fleet exist. The town of about 2,500 is home to the Thunderbolt Marina, which services some of the largest boats and yachts on the east coast, and a local shrimp shack, Thunderbolt Fisherman’s Seafood, continues to sell fresh shrimp by the river.

But time has eroded some of the town’s most impressive origins, histories that Williams said he wants to pay homage to in his term as mayor. In order to do so, establishing communication with residents and between residents is central, said Williams.

Communicating with residents

Prior to winning the mayoral seat against two-term incumbent Beth Goette, Williams served a term on council and on the ad hoc water committee. He credits his win to constant communication with the public, frequently posting on social media about council discussions and employing an on-the-ground approach to his campaign.

"I was knocking on doors and gave out my card with my personal cell phone number on it to everybody I talked to because I wanted people to know that I am available," said Williams, "I had so many people tell me that they had never had a Thunderbolt politician knock on their door."

But Williams is breaking the silence, and he said he's bringing that same energy to the top post in the city. In addition to making himself available, Williams and Town Administrator Bob Milie said they're working on modernizing Thunderbolt's approach to communication with the public by using social media.

"We're trying to be more open and more informative (by) establishing social media channels for all the departments for the town, utilizing the press more and giving our website a revamp," said Williams.

Additionally, Williams said he wants to reconvene the Thunderbolt Improvement Association, a neighborhood group formed over 50 years ago that became a major asset especially for the African American community, but had petered off in the age of COVID.

"It was a great way for the public to host their own meetings without any influence from council … and talk about what they want," he said, "and then the president of the association would bring all those concerns, ideas and whatnot to the council."

The neighborhood association along with the other initiatives are all key to one of the many priorities of the incoming mayor— reinvigorating a sense of community and reigniting Thunderbolt’s identity.

Bringing back community and identity

Michaele Yvonne Toomer-Reyes, a lifelong resident of Thunderbolt, said she remembers the town’s most anticipated event, The Blessing of the Fleet, a festival and religious ceremony borne out of the shrimping days.

The annual celebration consisted of “vendors, dancing, arts and crafts, lots of food, live shows, and a beauty pageant. And then the shrimp boats were blessed before the start of the shrimping season,” said Toomer-Reyes.

But the Blessing of the Fleet hasn’t been celebrated in decades as the shrimping industry declined, and, with it, the camaraderie between fishermen. Apartments and condominiums now hinder the views of the river on the bluff, said Toomer-Reyes.

“There used to be community events of all kinds when I was younger,” she said, “Then boat parades were canceled due to COVID (as well).”

Williams said he’s felt the residents’ collective yearning for kinship after years of a pandemic topped off decades of slipping identity.

“It was a big giant to-do and people miss that,” said Williams, “So we would like to bring that back in some form or fashion ... and really celebrate that waterfront heritage that we still have, even if we don’t have a fleet of shrimp boats anymore.”

Thunderbolt may be a small, unassuming town, but its history spans for more than a century and a half, and like its westward neighbor, Savannah, it's full of stories of progress and tension.

“This town is chock-full of history, it's amazing,” he said, “The Yacht Club started here, there was a casino, they used to have road races here, there was a major civil war battle right here on this bluff … and then you have the Native American tribes before all of us.”

It’s also home to Georgia’s first Historically Black College, Savannah State University.

The list goes on, and so do Williams' ideas to commemorate those historical happenings. Historical markers are part of the plan and, possibly, QR codes that visitors can scan on their phones and then watch or listen to oral histories told by Thunderbolt’s oldest residents on the Thunderbolt Museum website.

“The one thing we don’t ever want to lose is our sense of community and who we are,” said Williams, “If you don’t continue to tell the story, you lose it.”

Small town, big needs

On the other side of that effort, though, is the physical upkeep of Thunderbolt — the continuous need to preserve the city’s infrastructure and economy so that residents may keep living in it.

Unlike Chatham County’s westside municipalities, Thunderbolt isn’t facing issues of industrial and commercial growth that threaten residential life — at least not at the acute level of its neighbors. With Savannah on the east and the Wilmington River and unincorporated island communities on the west, the one-time fishing village is focused on existing physically.

Thunderbolt is the only city in the county to lose population over the course of a decade, according to 2020 census data. But there are plans to grow that with residential developments and businesses.

More:Bloomingdale's new mayor helped Pooler manage its early growth. Can he do the same again?

A mixed-use residential development, Village on the Bluff, is slated for completion next fall. Council is also starting to draft regulations on short-term vacation rentals (STVRs), which bring tourism and business, but also decrease the number of permanent residents living in the city — that, in turn, affects population-based funding avenues like SPLOST.

Town administrator, Milie, said Thunderbolt is also working on local policies that will streamline the process for businesses setting up in Thunderbolt. The main commercial corridors for the town are along River Drive and Victory Drive.

"We want to attract people that say, 'that's a hip upcoming community where I can see raising a family and get my cup of coffee here and walk my dog at the park...'" said Milie.

Meanwhile, Williams said the council will continue to focus on the infrastructure issues they’ve been working on this past term, which include updating the city’s water pipes and roads.

“Some of these pipes have been down there since World War II,” said Williams, “We have worked feverishly the last 12 years to locate all these valves and pipes.”

According to Williams, the city just finished an approximately $1.6 million pipe replacement project. Additionally, the city submitted an application for a $5.5 million state grant to address a sewage force main, as well as a smaller grant of about $50,000 for road repairs.

To maximize the town’s revenue sources, Milie said they are applying for federal and state grants when they can.

“This is a very small town with a very small tax base and you have to pick and choose. Is it going to be some parks this year or are we able to try and give raises to our dedicated employees, or is it going to be streets?,” said Milie, “We're trying to streamline through the budget process a way to identify and prioritize everything, and not be as reliant on certain other funding sources like SPLOST…”

With a full plate before the start of his new term, Williams said he's looking forward to working with the new set of council members.

"I'm really looking forward to four years of positivity and cohesiveness," said Williams, "We'll continue to build our relationships with one another and the town and just try to remove all the red tape and things that slow government down. I want to try to make it easier and smoother for not only citizens but for us as well."

Nancy Guan is the general assignment reporter covering Chatham County municipalities. Reach her at nguan@gannett.com or on Twitter @nancyguann.

Tybee Island candidate forum held Monday night

TYBEE ISLAND, Ga. (WTOC) - The candidate forum on Tybee Island was Monday at 7 p.m.Over the last few weeks, organizers of the event have been rounding up hundreds of questions from the community that they have for the six candidates running for the three open council seats.The candidate forum was held by Forever Tybee and the League of Women Voters.About 200 questions were submitted by the community and each candidate got one minute to answer each question asked.A forum like this gives the community an idea about ...

TYBEE ISLAND, Ga. (WTOC) - The candidate forum on Tybee Island was Monday at 7 p.m.

Over the last few weeks, organizers of the event have been rounding up hundreds of questions from the community that they have for the six candidates running for the three open council seats.

The candidate forum was held by Forever Tybee and the League of Women Voters.

About 200 questions were submitted by the community and each candidate got one minute to answer each question asked.

A forum like this gives the community an idea about where each candidate stands on various issues.

Nearly 100 questions were asked. Organizers say Tybee residents are always eager to learn more about the candidates each election.

“We get an amazing response from the citizens. Tybee’s active in terms of voting. Tybee is active in terms of getting involved in local government, but they want to meet these candidates. So we give them the chance to do that,” said Shirley Wright, Chair of Forever Tybee.

The event was limited to 50 in person attendees but organizers say the virtual meeting had dozens more people tuning in. Many of the questions asked were sent in by community members.

Topics covered everything from tourism, quality of life, infrastructure, ethics among many other things. Moderator Susan Catron says she thinks the questions asked offered a good insight into all the candidates positions on the issues.

“I would think so we went through 100 questions tonight so I think they got a good look at the candidates and they’ll be able to decide Informed citizenry is the bedrock of democracy so that’s a good start here on Tybee,” Catron said.

This is the sixth election they’ve hosted this forum. Organizers say each one has been a success thanks to the high community member turnout. They say Tybee residents are very involved in community affairs.

“A community that’s so involved in what’s going to happen. They care so much about what’s next for them and how to solve their problems creatively,” Catron said.

On Oct. 31 from 2-5 p.m. Forever Tybee is hosting a meet and greet with the candidates at the Memorial Park Pavilion. This is free and open to the public and serves as another chance for people to get to know the candidates.

Copyright 2021 WTOC. All rights reserved.

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