Criminal Defense Attorney in Wilmington Island, GA.

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Drug Attorney Wilmington Island, GA
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Learn about our areas of experties involving state crimes, and better understand your rights.

 Drug Defense Lawyer Wilmington Island, GA
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Learn about our areas of experties involving state crimes, and better understand your rights.

If you are accused of a crime, the only thing standing between your freedom and a verdict of "guilty" is an experienced criminal defense attorney in Wilmington Island, GA.

Those who have been arrested before know that life in the legal system is no laughing matter. Aside from the imminent ramifications of fines and jail time, any goals you have of bettering yourself and advancing your life could be compromised. Without a trusted attorney by your side, you could face a lifetime of embarrassment and poor employment prospects due to a tarnished criminal record.

The good news? Dennis O'Brien and his team of experienced lawyers in Wilmington Island are ready to clear your name. By retaining the help of a criminal defense attorney early in the legal process, you have a much better chance of securing your freedom and living a life as a productive member of society.

At O'Brien Law Firm PC, our practice was founded to fight for the rights of individuals accused of or charged with a crime. Our team of legal experts is well-equipped to take even the most difficult, contentious cases. From violent felonies to DUI, there is nothing we haven't seen and handled. As a former law enforcement officer, founding attorney Dennis O'Brien knows exactly how much a person can lose if convicted. That's why we work tirelessly to secure a verdict that is favorable for our clients.

Regardless of how serious or minor your case may be, know that we will fight fearlessly on your behalf. You deserve zealous representation - when you hire O'Brien Law Firm PC, you will receive nothing less.

 Drug Lawyer Wilmington Island, GA
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The O'Brien Law Firm PC Difference

Many of our clients are surprised to discover that founding lawyer Dennis O'Brien was a police officer prior to his criminal defense career. As a former Field Training Officer for the Memphis Police Department, he has over two decades of knowledge and experience in the criminal justice system. Dennis truly understands the nuance and complexities involved in a criminal defense case. This rare experience gives Dennis a clear edge in any criminal defense case and gives clients priceless peace of mind when they need it the most. Unlike some criminal defense attorneys in Wilmington Island, Dennis O'Brien and his team believe that every client deserves effective, empathetic legal assistance. While some Wilmington Island criminal defense firms will take weekends off or pass along cases to paralegals, Dennis personally reviews each of his cases. There is no case too small or big for O'Brien Law Firm PC. When you hire our firm, you can rest easy knowing that we will be by your side when the going gets tough.

 Federal Defense Attorney Wilmington Island, GA
Here are just a few reasons why O'Brien Law Firm PC is Wilmington Island's top choice in criminal defense:
  • Vigorous Representation
  • Fierce Dedication to Clients
  • Unmatched Experience
  • Face-to-Face Counsel
  • Prompt Response to Inquiries and Questions
  • Commitment to Defending Your Rights
  • Thorough, Effective Research and Investigation
  • Contact Us or Call: 912-704-5150
 Criminal Defense Law Firms Wilmington Island, GA
Our firm has represented hundreds of criminal defense clients in Wilmington Island and is highly qualified to take your case. Some of our specialties include:

Drug Cases in Wilmington Island, GA

When you are charged with a drug crime in Wilmington Island, it can change your life forever. Georgia imposes very strict punishments for drug offenses. The truth is, it's hard to get your life back on track with a drug charge on your record. Your freedom and way of life could be in the hands of your criminal defense attorney. As such, you need a competent lawyer with years of experience handling drug cases. Leaving your fate in the hands of an incompetent attorney could have long-lasting effects on your family and may result in a conviction.

 Criminal Defense Lawyers Wilmington Island, GA

Consequences for drug crimes in Wilmington Island often include:

  • Jail
  • Prison
  • Heavy fines
  • Community service
  • Court-ordered drug and alcohol counseling
  • Probation or parole
  • Permanent criminal record

While the consequences for a drug crime in Georgia are serious, there's reason to be hopeful: O'Brien Law Firm PC is here to fight for you. Remember - being charged with a drug crime is NOT the same thing as being convicted.

Our stellar team has represented many clients facing numerous drug-related charges. While each situation varies, one constant remains the same for clients facing drug charges: a fear of what lies ahead. At O'Brien Law Firm PC our job is to help you overcome the fear of the unknown. We do so by ensuring you understand your charges, the possible outcomes associated with those charges, and the options you need to consider from a criminal defense standpoint.

With more than a decade of experience as Wilmington Island drug crime attorneys, we have the experience and resources to defend you in court no matter what your charges may be, including:

  • Marijuana
  • Crack
  • Cocaine
  • Heroin
  • Methamphetamine
  • Ecstasy

No matter what charge you are facing, our team has the experience and resources to build a comprehensive defense strategy for your drug case in Wilmington Island, GA. Without a criminal defense attorney acting as your advocate, you could be facing very harsh penalties. Here are a few punishments you could be facing for drug crimes in Wilmington Island:

  • Schedule I or Schedule II Drug Possession
    Schedule I or Schedule II Drug Possession:

    Having less than a gram (or one milliliter for liquids) of this type of drug results in a prison term of one to three years. Having four grams or milliliter carries a term of one to eight years.

  • Schedule III, IV, or V Drug Possession
    Schedule III, IV, or V Drug Possession:

    Any substance on this list is punishable by a prison sentence of one to three years.

  • Non-Narcotic Schedule II Drug Possession
    Non-Narcotic Schedule II Drug Possession:

    If you have less than two grams or milliliters of this substance, punishments can be between one year and three years. Having up to four grams or milliliters results in a prison sentence of one to eight years.

  • Possession of Marijuana
    Possession of Marijuana:

    Those who are in possession of less than an ounce of marijuana are subject to a jail sentence of up to 12 months. Fines may be no more than $1,000. Possession of more than an ounce of marijuana can result in a prison term of one to 10 years.

To avoid these life-changing punishments, you must take action now. Contact O'Brien Law Firm today for a consultation about your case.

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 Defense Lawyers Wilmington Island, GA
 Criminal Defense Attorney Wilmington Island, GA

Violent Crime Cases in Wilmington Island, GA

Violent crime offenses in Wilmington Island typically involve some form of bodily harm to another individual, actions committed against an individual's will, or threatening someone with bodily harm. Aggravated violent offenses are more severe charges and often occur when a violent crime is made more serious due to circumstances like deadly weapons.

Much like serious drug cases, violent crimes create an added layer of negativity that follows the accused for the rest of their life. In these cases, even an accusation is enough to cause irreparable damage to a person's reputation. Those convicted of a violent crime face severe penalties that can include years in a correctional facility.

Common crimes of this nature include but are not limited to:
  • Murder
  • Assault with the intent to murder
  • Vehicular homicide
  • Domestic violence
  • Assault
  • Battery
  • Kidnapping
  • Rape
  • Robbery
  • Carjacking

When you are accused of any of the above crimes, your freedom hangs in the balance. The outcome of your case will determine whether you leave the courtroom with your freedom intact or stripped away to serve time behind bars. Because the punishments for violent crimes are so extreme, you should be seeking legal counsel from a criminal defense attorney in Wilmington Island, GA, as soon as possible. As a former police officer with a long record of positive verdicts in violent crime cases, Dennis O'Brien is well equipped to represent you in court.

Having a criminal defense lawyer by your side is the best way to avoid the serious punishments associated with violent crimes. These punishments usually result in prison time if convicted and include:
Forced rape: 20 years
Armed robbery: Up to 20 years
Simple assault: Up to 12 months
Aggravated assault: 10 to 20 years
Aggravated battery: Up to 20 years
Involuntary manslaughter: One to 20 years
Vehicular homicide Up to 15 years
Murder: Life in prison or the death sentence
Zealous Representation Without Judgement

As a former police officer, Dennis O'Brien has seen the toll it takes on a person when charged with a crime. His time in law enforcement allows him to empathize with his clients who desperately need competent representation. Despite being innocent until proven guilty, accusations are scary, and conviction could be a reality. That is why you must work with a trustworthy criminal defense lawyer in Wilmington Island, GA who will work tirelessly to clear your name.

Clients choose O'Brien Law Firm because we believe in open communication, honesty, and hard work. It is not our job to act as judges for those who have been accused of crimes. Rather, our goal is to find the best defense that allows us to protect our clients' rights and freedoms.

DUI Cases in Wilmington Island, GA

Driving under the influence (DUI) is one of the most common crimes committed in Georgia. Punishments for such a crime can be severe, and for understandable reasons - when a person operates a vehicle while they are intoxicated, they're putting their life and the lives of others at risk.

While DUI is a serious crime that completely upend the accused's life, the earnest desire to end drunk driving can make police officers too eager to catch a person who they believe is under the influence.

 Criminal Defense Law Firm Wilmington Island, GA

The city of Wilmington Island, Georgia, has implemented severe punishments for DUI, even for first-time offenders. Individuals charged with DUI in Wilmington Island could face:

  • Very expensive fines and fees
  • Loss of license
  • Incarceration

Fortunately, if you or someone you love has been charged with DUI, there is hope. This is particularly true when the accused is administered a breath or blood test for DUI. In fact, cases that involve a breath and/or blood test are beaten daily. When you hire O'Brien Law Firm PC, we will dive deep into your DUI case in Wilmington Island and examine every angle possible for your case to be dismissed. Here are just a few questions our team will investigate:

  • Was the stop legal? If not, your case could be dismissed
  • Is there enough evidence or probable cause to arrest you? If not, Dennis O'Brien will file a pre-trial motion and will fight hard to have your case dismissed before trial.
  • Did the police read you your implied consent rights? If not, your case could be thrown out. Failure to read implied consent rights to the accused is one of the most common police errors.
  • Were your blood testing records and breathalyzer results maintained? Breath testing comes with inherent weaknesses that can create doubt in a juror's mind.

There are numerous ways to beat a DUI case in Georgia, from unreliable field sobriety tests to inaccurate state-administered breath tests. As a veteran criminal defense lawyer in Wilmington Island, GA, Dennis O'Brien has the knowledge and experience to expose the state's mistakes and fight for your rights. When you hire O'Brien Law Firm PC your chances of dismissal are greatly increased. When your case is dismissed, you can continue living life without the burden of a criminal record.

 Criminal Justice Attorney Wilmington Island, GA

If you or someone you love is accused of a crime in Wilmington Island, GA, don't leave fate up to the prosecution. Take the necessary steps to protect yourself and your family before it's too late.

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Latest News in Wilmington Island, GA

Clearwave Fiber Continues Buildout of Fiber Internet in Savannah

Fast, reliable, high-speed Internet service expands for residents and businesses in Savannah, Hinesville and Richmond HillSAVANNAH, Ga., Oct. 28, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Clearwave Fiber continues its construction of a state-of-the art, all-Fiber Internet network in the Coastal Empire. This latest expansion for the Savannah-based operation marks a continuation of almost 6,000 route miles of Fiber in the Southeast and Midwest. The company's goal is to bring the most advanced and fastest Internet available to more than 500,000...

Fast, reliable, high-speed Internet service expands for residents and businesses in Savannah, Hinesville and Richmond Hill

SAVANNAH, Ga., Oct. 28, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Clearwave Fiber continues its construction of a state-of-the art, all-Fiber Internet network in the Coastal Empire. This latest expansion for the Savannah-based operation marks a continuation of almost 6,000 route miles of Fiber in the Southeast and Midwest. The company's goal is to bring the most advanced and fastest Internet available to more than 500,000 homes and businesses across the United States by the end of 2026.

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"Clearwave Fiber is excited to contribute to the continual growth in Southeast Georgia and provide such a crucial resource to residents and commercial operations," said Clearwave Fiber General Manager John Robertson. "We're committed to providing communities with the high-speed connectivity that is essential for families, businesses and local economies."

Clearwave Fiber formed in January of 2022, rebranding from Hargray Fiber, which has been serving the Southeast for 70+ years. Senior leadership and operations management have a long history with Hargray and now lead Clearwave Fiber during this rapid expansion. "We're ingrained in the fabric of Savannah and its surrounding communities," said Clearwave Fiber Chief Operating Officer Gwynne Lastinger. "Our sales and technical support staff live and work in the Coastal Empire and we continue to add to our team of more than 500 throughout the Southeast and Midwest."

Featuring gigabit download and upload speeds, Clearwave Fiber will bring 10 times more speed to consumer doorsteps at a time when fast, reliable Internet is becoming increasingly critical to modern households and businesses. Remote work, streaming, gaming, smart home technology and multiple device connectivity all require robust, reliable connections. Clearwave Fiber is committed to providing hassle-free, high-quality Fiber data connection to every location of its growing footprint.

"We're seeing an increase in households where multiple online activities are occurring at the same time. Many Internet connections aren't up to the task of keeping it all running at top speeds," said Robertson. "Clearwave Fiber solves the problem of the bandwidth issues that happen when everyone in the house is connected. We also have solutions for businesses that keep them operating on a fast, reliable network."

For many consumers, Internet touches every facet of daily life. Remote work, telehealth, and virtual learning all require robust, reliable connections. A 2022 study by Deloitte indicated that 45 percent of surveyed households include one or more remote workers, and 23 percent include at least one or more household member attending school from home. Additionally, 49 percent of U.S. adults had virtual medical appointments in the past year.

In addition, the Deloitte report noted that the average U.S. household now utilizes a total of 22 connected devices, including laptops, tablets, smartphones, smart TVs, game consoles, home concierge systems like Amazon Echo and Google Nest, fitness trackers, camera and security systems, and smart home devices such as connected exercise machines and thermostats.

Supporting this burgeoning ecosystem of household devices can challenge companies serving customers over DSL or cable systems. "Older copper wire and coaxial networks worked just fine for the technologies they were built for. Copper lines are great for telephone calls and coax worked well for cable TV, but those networks struggle to deliver the kind of bandwidth possible with fiber," noted Lastinger. "Fiber optic technology is the future. Fiber networks are more durable, more consistent, and they move data at the speed of light. Best of all, our network easily keeps pace with technology innovations, exponentially increasing demands for bandwidth, and evolving customer needs. The options are almost limitless."

Fiber networks are currently being installed on Wilmington and Whitemarsh Islands, Windsor Forest, Hinesville, Rincon, Pooler and Richmond Hill. Clearwave Fiber is scheduled to complete these projects by the end of November and will continue working in other areas in the region into 2023 and beyond.

For more information, visit ClearwaveFiber.com.

About Clearwave Fiber

Clearwave Fiber is an internet service provider that operates a nearly 6,000 route-mile Fiber network serving communities across the Midwest and Southeast regions of the United States. With an emphasis on exceptional customer care and community engagement, the fast-growing company delivers advanced telecommunications solutions, providing fiber to business, enterprise and residential customers in Illinois, Kansas, Florida and Georgia. Committed to deploying 100% fiber internet service to 500,000 homes and businesses across the country by the end of 2026, Clearwave Fiber employs more than 500 and is based in Savannah, Ga. Learn more at ClearwaveFiber.com, Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

SOURCE Clearwave Fiber

Georgians rocked by hurricanes prepare for future storms

This coverage is made possible through a partnership with WABE and Grist, a nonprofit, independent media organization dedicated to telling stories of climate solutions and a just future.When Hurricane Matthew passed offshore of Georgia in 2016, it tore down trees, damaged houses and flooded much of the coast. But Larry and Donna Piper didn’t get much wat...

This coverage is made possible through a partnership with WABE and Grist, a nonprofit, independent media organization dedicated to telling stories of climate solutions and a just future.

When Hurricane Matthew passed offshore of Georgia in 2016, it tore down trees, damaged houses and flooded much of the coast. But Larry and Donna Piper didn’t get much water — about two inches in part of their marsh-front home on Tybee Island. So when Hurricane Irma came less than a year later, they decided to stay put rather than evacuate again.

“The water just kept coming and coming,” said Larry Piper of Irma, which hit right at high tide. “I took all my sandbags at the back door and deposited them in the front yard. That’s how swift the current was.”

They had four feet of water on their property, and more than two feet inside the house. And that meant everything — floor, sheetrock, appliances — had to go.

“I tore it all the way down to the tin roof and the studs,” said Piper.

It was the same at nearly every house on their street, which sits on the back side of the island with marsh on both sides.

“As you can see, most of them were fairly modest homes,” said George Shaw, the City of Tybee’s community development director. “And this was, you know, a working class neighborhood. This was not fancy beachfront homes.”

Most houses on the street aren’t vacation houses; they’re primary residences.

“Some folks were able to save some stuff,” said Shaw of the damage. “But after Irma, every yard had a giant pile in front of it. Full of stuff.”

Most of those houses, including the Pipers,’ sat only a foot or two off the ground. So the city applied for, and received, a federal grant to elevate houses — most of them on this street. The Pipers’ house now stands almost 11 feet off the ground on concrete columns, high enough to park their cars under and hopefully high enough to stay dry.

As another hurricane season approaches, home elevation is just one way that Georgians devastated by hurricanes in recent years are preparing.

The storms drove home how vulnerable much of the state is and highlighted unforeseen dangers. As climate change makes storms stronger, steps to keep people and property safe are more essential than ever.

“This is not looming. This is not ‘it’s coming.’ It’s here,” said Marshall Shepherd, the director of UGA’s atmospheric sciences program. “So what are we doing about it? Who’s most impacted? And how do we move forward from a policy and a sort of societal fabric standpoint, to deal with it?”

Leaders all over Georgia are grappling with those questions, made all the more urgent by recent experience.

Hurricane Matthew passed Georgia in October 2016, and while it stayed offshore it brought tropical storm-force winds and a storm surge of more than seven feet over the normal high tide. The storm ripped down so many trees and branches that it shattered the Army Corps of Engineers’ models predicting storm debris.

Just 11 months later, Hurricane Irma hit, in September 2017. That storm traveled over land up the Florida peninsula and into Georgia, where it caused widespread flooding along the coastal marshes. Coupled with heavy rainfall in the days prior to the storm, Irma overwhelmed stormwater systems on the southern portion of the coast, making the flooding worse.

Both storms prompted mandatory evacuations of all of Georgia’s coastal counties. The coast evacuated again for Hurricane Dorian in September 2019. That storm caused minimal flooding, but that was a matter of lucky timing: Dorian’s storm surge matched the forecasts, but the storm coincided with low tide.

Hurricane Michael, meanwhile, exposed dangers of climate change that experts hadn’t focused on before.

In October 2018, Michael made landfall in the Florida Panhandle as a category-five hurricane — the first storm that strong to do so in the mainland U.S. It was still a category-two storm when it reached Southwest Georgia, eventually weakening to a tropical storm as it crossed the state.

“If you’d asked me five years ago, what would I be most worried about in the southern part of the state in terms of climate vulnerability, I would have said drought and its impact on agriculture,” Shepherd said. “Now I would have to say drought, plus perhaps the impact of really strong hurricanes that maintain their intensity as they move further inland.”

Scientists say that hurricanes won’t necessarily get more frequent as climate change intensifies, but they will get stronger, on average. It’s already happening. And if storms are stronger to begin with, even as they weaken over land they’ll be stronger than they were in decades past when they reach inland areas.

Eric Cohen experienced that firsthand when Hurricane Michael struck Southwest Georgia, where he was farming more than 1,400 acres of pecans.

“It took 800 acres of our farm, devastated it, laid it on the ground,” he said. “So basically, I’m only farming 200 acres of pecans now.”

It takes about a decade for pecan trees to mature, so Cohen said it just didn’t make sense to replant. He’s now a real estate agent in nearby Thomasville. He leases the rest of his land to farmers growing crops like peanuts and cotton that can bounce back faster. And rather than taking over the pecan farm, Cohen’s son is studying to be a dentist.

“I’ve been preaching this to my son, that you don’t need to depend on these pecans, buddy. We’re too weather dependent,” he said.

That’s how Cohen is preparing for the next storm: by finding an income it can’t destroy.

All over the state, individuals and communities are preparing in their own ways. Just this week, Colquitt in Southwest Georgia got funding from the state to shore up its water system against future storms. Tybee already took similar steps, adding generators to sewer infrastructure so it works during power outages.

The city of Tybee is hoping to get another federal grant to lift another 49 houses out of danger, though that will take time. After Irma, it was three and a half years before the Pipers could move back into the elevated house. Elevation work is still underway on another house on their street, five years after the storm.

Some of the Pipers’ Tybee neighbors opted not to raise their houses because of the disruption or the expense. Even with a grant, homeowners have to pay 15% of the elevation cost, which totals about $150,000, according to Shaw. And they’d have to move out while the house is lifted.

The city is working to prevent that next flood, too. It’s already built up dunes on the ocean side of the island. On the back side, where the Pipers live, the city is considering options like a bulkhead or a living shoreline that could protect the homes from rising water in the marsh.

As for the Pipers, even though their house is high above the water now, they’ll evacuate next time because a flood would still destroy their cars. Donna Piper said they can’t help but take storms seriously now.

“Twenty years ago, I didn’t think about all this flooding. You know, hurricane, li’l ol’ hurricane, no big deal,” she said. “But now, it is a big deal.”

Savannah To Tybee Island: Why This Is The Perfect Georgia Day Trip

Known as the “Peach State,” the state of Georgia is not just about the deep-flavored peaches that have become a symbol of this historic state. In reality, peanuts easily edge out peaches as the most abundant food item in the Empire State of the South. Away from peaches or peanuts, Georgia is flat-out gorgeous. Many will find the scenery, especially in the northern regions, absolutely amazing. And even for those who don’t enjoy the effervescent beverage that has come to define any social scene, a trip to Atlanta, where the w...

Known as the “Peach State,” the state of Georgia is not just about the deep-flavored peaches that have become a symbol of this historic state. In reality, peanuts easily edge out peaches as the most abundant food item in the Empire State of the South. Away from peaches or peanuts, Georgia is flat-out gorgeous. Many will find the scenery, especially in the northern regions, absolutely amazing. And even for those who don’t enjoy the effervescent beverage that has come to define any social scene, a trip to Atlanta, where the world’s best-selling drink is made, will be a thoroughly rewarding experience.

Coming to the south, Tybee Island, off the charming town of Savannah, has some of the finest beaches in the state. To add to that, the road from Savannah to Tybee is lined with some cool attractions — as if providing a thrilling foretaste of what awaits at the beach.

Road Trip From Savannah To Tybee Island

For a trip to Tybee Island, it’s advisable to arrive in Savannah early enough so that by 9.00 AM, the adventure has begun in earnest. From downtown Savannah, Forsyth Park should be the first stop. The distance from downtown Savannah to Forsyth Park is just about five minutes. Someone on East Bay Street will need to get onto Gwinnett Street from where this idyllic park is just a stroll away. Giant oak trees, with leafy outstretched boughs, shade this historic park, the largest and oldest in Savannah. Overhead, overlapping tree branches form a shaded canopy that extends almost all the way to the fountain, one of the city’s most-visited icons. About an hour here will be enough to enjoy its attractions.

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From Forsyth Park, the next stop should be Bonaventure Cemetery, about seven minutes down the road. The distance is about 3.6 miles (5.8 km) on E Anderson Street. A cemetery would, in many instances, not qualify as an attraction. However, the scenic setting of Bonaventure Cemetery on a picturesque section near the Wilmington River, makes it quite a hot favorite for travelers.

The beautiful, tree-lined roads; the unique cemetery look and the architecture; and the notable names of those who sleep under; all combine to give the place an aura that is so rustic and charming — that it’ll be easy to forget that this is a cemetery — the quintessential embodiment of human pain and despair. Spend a quiet hour at this destination, walking in the shade of ancient oaks, most of which are now covered in Spanish moss, and taking in the majestic stillness of the environment — that is so very calming and relaxing. This done, it’ll be time to hit the road for Fort Pulaski National Monument. This is an 18-minute drive on US-80 E that will be one of the most tranquil along the entire stretch.

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Fort Pulaski, once proclaimed “as strong as the Rocky Mountains,” is just at the mouth of the Savannah River. There’s a lot of interesting history to learn here. Military history. Civil war history. Out on the moat, alligators grin mischievously as eagles and falcons soar high in the sky. Obviously, a camera should be at hand. About an hour here should be enough. It'll be time for a grand entry to Tybee Island, a 10-minute drive away on US -80 E. This is a road distance of about 5.6 miles (9 km).

Here Are All The Exciting Things To See And Do On Tybee Island

Cascading miles of powder-soft sand; beautifully wrinkled, turquoise waters of the Atlantic; and soft, refreshing breezes that ruffle the palm leaves fringing the restless waters — are some of the defining characteristics of Tybee Island beaches. Tybee Island boasts three public beaches. However, aside from the oceanfront beaches, the island also has two river beaches that, even though lesser-known, are no less charming. The oceanfront beaches include South Beach, North Beach, and Mid Beach. River beaches are Tybee Back River Beach and Savannah River Beach. One can enjoy many splashy activities at any of these beaches, including swimming, kayaking, and paddling. This is because the waters are gentle — and just the perfect state for such boating activities. In fact, Tybee Island is one of the finest boating spots on the east coast.

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But when it comes to surfing, the truth is that Tybee Island is not a great place for cruising on a surfboard. While the waters may swell occasionally, and one may chance on some fine surfing moments, these are not as regular or frequent. Away from the ocean, the Lighthouse, the first in the state packs a punch in history —and would be a must-see for history buffs. The pier, with its large pavilion area, is a great place for dolphin watching, fishing, or holding parties.

Here’s the truth: A visit to Georgia’s Savannah will not be complete without a mandatory detour to Tybee Beach.

10 Festive Ways To Celebrate Fall In Savannah, Georgia

The coastal Georgian city of Savannah is a hub of industry and commercial development. Simultaneously, being the oldest city in Georgia, Savannah provides attractions related to history, art, and good eats for curious travelers. Plus, this coastal city has no shortage of classic southern charm! Being only a couple of hours away from Atlanta, Savannah is a great destination to celebrate the upcoming fall season. From its picturesq...

The coastal Georgian city of Savannah is a hub of industry and commercial development. Simultaneously, being the oldest city in Georgia, Savannah provides attractions related to history, art, and good eats for curious travelers. Plus, this coastal city has no shortage of classic southern charm! Being only a couple of hours away from Atlanta, Savannah is a great destination to celebrate the upcoming fall season. From its picturesque landscape of moss-draped trees to its rich historical heritage, here are ten festive ways to celebrate fall in Savannah.

Stay At The 17Hundred90 Inn And Restaurant

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Being the oldest hotel in Savannah, the 17Hundred90 Inn and Restaurant resides inside a building constructed around the 1820s, formerly owned by the Power Family until the late 1880s. Besides its rich history, avid believers in the paranormal will be delighted to know it’s haunted. The inn is said to be haunted by three resident ghosts: Anna and Thaddeus are friendly spirits who greet visitors around the inn’s restaurant and rooms (specifically, room 204). Meanwhile, a third ghost—haunts the kitchen—is said to be a little less welcoming to guests and kitchen staff.

Visit Forsyth Park

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Relax and experience fall in Savannah at the famous Forsyth Park. Take a selfie in front of the park’s most photographed fountain (which is over 150 years old!) or watch the world go sitting on one of the park benches. There is no shortage of activities at Forsyth Park, as it’s a popular locale for weddings, photo shoots, live music, and, occasionally, free concerts. Bring the kids here, too—there are tons of spaces to run around, including a spacious playground!

Visit The Bonaventure Cemetery

Many people picture Savannah as a charming Southern city decorated with massive oak trees draped with Spanish moss. Luckily, the Bonaventure Cemetery fulfills that very fantasy. In hindsight, visiting a cemetery may seem peculiar, but this well-known Savannah cemetery exudes a southern “Gothic” charm that has inspired countless artists through the centuries. Enjoy the crisp autumn weather while exploring this famous yet peaceful cemetery by the Wilmington River. Guided tours are also available to help visitors navigate the hundreds of acres of property at the Bonaventure Cemetery!

Eat (And Stay) At The Wilkes House

A trip to Savannah would not be complete without eating at Mrs. Wilkes Dining Room. When doors open at 11 AM, this locally loved restaurant gets busy serving homemade classics like okra gumbo, corn muffins, sweet potato souffle, and crispy fried chicken. Warm the cockles of one’s heart by enjoying a meal at Mrs. Wilkes Dining Room this fall. Visitors can also stay nearby at the Wilkes Collection, a historic piece of Savannah.

Visit Tybee Island For The Pirate Fest

Savannah’s beach town of Tybee Island may seem like a great summer destination. However, visitors can venture to Tybee for the annual Pirate Fest during the first week of October. Since 2005, Tybee Island has hosted the Pirate Fest to attract tourists during the city’s “off-season.” However, almost 17 years later, the Pirate Fest successfully attracts pirate enthusiasts every year from all corners of the globe. Bring out the inner pirate and venture to Tybee Island for the ultimate family- and kid-friendly event in Savannah!

Bike Through Savannah’s Historic District

Cycling is not only a fall affair! Feel the refreshing fall breeze and bike through Savannah’s Historic District, equipped with dozens of historic and heritage buildings from different times. Cycle through Jones Street, reportedly the most beautiful street in the country. Additionally, fans of Forrest Gump can visit Chippewa Square, home of the same bench where Forrest sat! Alternatively, travelers can still explore Savannah’s Historic District by foot or take the touristy path and embark on a trolley tour.

Take A Haunted Ghost Tour

Feel the creepy and ghostly vibes this fall and take a ghost tour in Savannah. With numerous operators offering a spooky experience in the city this season, travelers have plenty of opportunities to scare themselves with stories of haunted sites around the city, including (but not limited to) the Mercer-Williams House, Colonial Park Cemetery, and the Sorrel-Weed House.

Catch A Flick At The SCAD Savannah Film Festival

Besides viewing the fall foliage or visiting Savannah’s historic sites this fall, cinephiles will love attending the Savannah Film Festival, organized by the Savannah College Art and Design (SCAD). This internationally acclaimed film festival is one of the biggest in North America, attracting over 63,000 attendees worldwide, including notable celebrities and film professionals. To attend this film festival, be sure to visit Savannah during the last week of October!

Shop Along River Street And City Market

Known for a range of boutiques and local shops, a visit to River Street and City Market is a great activity for travelers who love shopping! City Market is blessed with four blocks of shops and eateries, giving travelers many shopping (and dining) options. Additionally, don’t forget to visit the Plant Riverside District this fall to see the newest entertainment district in Savannah.

Visit The Wormsloe State Historic Site

Formerly known as the Wormsloe Plantation, the Wormsloe State Historic Site is blessed with miles of oak trees covered in Spanish moss, making for a picturesque stroll. While enjoying the scenic fall scape, learn about the storied history of the property, which spans centuries. Wormsloe also includes landmarks like grave sites, Tabby Ruins, an on-site museum, picnic areas, a gift shop, and pet-friendly trails.

Georgia Southern research project seeks to fill in the gaps of African American maritime history

Jack Kronowitz is trudging through a muddy river bank, trying not to trip as he scans the ground for artifacts. Finally, he finds one — sort of.“There's a whole CD player in there,” Kronowitz says. “Like, circa 2005.”A bygone era, to be sure, but not quite the historical period that Kronowitz and his Georgia Southern University classmates are hoping to document at Young's Marina on Wilmington Island, just east of Savannah.As one of the oldest Black-owned marinas in Georgia, it's part of a ne...

Jack Kronowitz is trudging through a muddy river bank, trying not to trip as he scans the ground for artifacts. Finally, he finds one — sort of.

“There's a whole CD player in there,” Kronowitz says. “Like, circa 2005.”

A bygone era, to be sure, but not quite the historical period that Kronowitz and his Georgia Southern University classmates are hoping to document at Young's Marina on Wilmington Island, just east of Savannah.

As one of the oldest Black-owned marinas in Georgia, it's part of a new research project at GSU that seeks to fill in the gaps surrounding maritime history as it pertains to the experiences of African Americans.

“One of the things I've noticed about Savannah is that it's untapped in terms of this kind of history,” said GSU history professor Kurt Knoerl, whose maritime history students have gathered on a Saturday morning to map what appears, at first blush, to be abandoned railroad tracks.

In fact, they're old boat rails. Marina owner Sarah Suggs is excited to learn more about them, as they're what her grandfather Willie Young would use to lower his hand-built boats into Turner Creek off of the Wilmington River in the early 1900s, back when his business was called Young's Fishing Camp.

Referring to the written report that the students are preparing for her, Suggs said, “It gives me an opportunity to be cautiously proud.”

Proud of the history behind the property — which Young bought with his brother-in-law William Soloman — but cautious about the obstacles that she and other Black business owners still face more than 100 years later.

“If you own a black business, it takes a lot longer to do anything,” Suggs said. “I've had projects that I'm responsible for — they've taken three-plus years. I've had people that don't know I'm Black, and once I come out that back door, I've seen people just get in their cars and leave. I've had a lot of my neighbors — they will bring their children to go down and look at the sailboats. [But] they would never do business with us.”

Still, Suggs says that things are better now than during her childhood, when her father Isaac Young owned the business.

Aside from Young's Marina, the research project has been studying a number of maritime sites where African American history runs deep, such as Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge along Blackbeard Creek between Savannah and Brunswick. Originally the home of a Gullah Geechee community, residents were displaced by the federal government during World War II to build an airfield.

Looking ahead, Knoerl says that the overall project — supported by a grant from the Georgia Sea Grant College Program — has raised even more questions for future exploration.

“For instance, there are oyster processing places throughout the area that really haven't been explored or mapped out, other than Pinpoint Heritage Museum, which is wonderful, and they do a great job of that,” Knoerl said. “But that's one of many in the area. There is the boat-building tradition in Savannah that could use more study. So, deciding what to do next — it's a fun problem to have.”

Aside from archeology, other students are collecting oral histories, including childhood memories from Sarah Suggs.

“I knew how to put a boat in the hoist, and I don't think my daddy knew what I knew,” Suggs recounted. “So, one day I put a boat in the water, had the boat up in the air, about to go in the water. My daddy comes and he says, ‘Girls don't do that,’ and literally bumped me out of the way. So, the fact that I now keep the train on the track, I know my father is in heaven looking down — ‘That girl did it anyway.’”

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