Criminal Defense Attorney in Skidaway Island, GA.

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If you are accused of a crime, the only thing standing between your freedom and a verdict of “guilty” is an experienced criminal defense attorney in Skidaway Island, GA.

Those who have been arrested before know that life in the legal system is no laughing matter. Aside from the imminent ramifications of fines and jail time, any goals you have of bettering yourself and advancing your life could be compromised. Without a trusted attorney by your side, you could face a lifetime of embarrassment and poor employment prospects due to a tarnished criminal record.

The good news? Dennis O’Brien and his team of experienced lawyers in Skidaway Island are ready to clear your name. By retaining the help of a criminal defense attorney early in the legal process, you have a much better chance of securing your freedom and living a life as a productive member of society.

At O’Brien Law Firm PC, our practice was founded to fight for the rights of individuals accused of or charged with a crime. Our team of legal experts is well-equipped to take even the most difficult, contentious cases. From violent felonies to DUI, there is nothing we haven’t seen and handled. As a former law enforcement officer, founding attorney Dennis O’Brien knows exactly how much a person can lose if convicted. That’s why we work tirelessly to secure a verdict that is favorable for our clients.

Regardless of how serious or minor your case may be, know that we will fight fearlessly on your behalf. You deserve zealous representation – when you hire O’Brien Law Firm PC, you will receive nothing less.

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The O’Brien Law Firm PC Difference

Many of our clients are surprised to discover that founding lawyer Dennis O’Brien was a police officer prior to his criminal defense career. As a former Field Training Officer for the Memphis Police Department, he has over two decades of knowledge and experience in the criminal justice system. Dennis truly understands the nuance and complexities involved in a criminal defense case. This rare experience gives Dennis a clear edge in any criminal defense case and gives clients priceless peace of mind when they need it the most. Unlike some criminal defense attorneys in Skidaway Island, Dennis O’Brien and his team believe that every client deserves effective, empathetic legal assistance. While some Skidaway Island criminal defense firms will take weekends off or pass along cases to paralegals, Dennis personally reviews each of his cases. There is no case too small or big for O’Brien Law Firm PC. When you hire our firm, you can rest easy knowing that we will be by your side when the going gets tough.

The OBrien Law Firm PC Difference
Here are just a few reasons why O’Brien Law Firm PC is Skidaway Island’s top choice in criminal defense:
  • Vigorous Representation
  • Fierce Dedication to Clients
  • Unmatched Experience
  • Face-to-Face Counsel
  • Prompt Response to Inquiries and Questions
  • Commitment to Defending Your Rights
  • Thorough, Effective Research and Investigation
  • Contact Us or Call: 912.704.5150
Our firm has represented hundreds of criminal defense clients
Our firm has represented hundreds of criminal defense clients in Skidaway Island and is highly qualified to take your case. Some of our specialties include:

Drug Cases in Skidaway Island, GA

When you are charged with a drug crime in Skidaway Island, it can change your life forever. Georgia imposes very strict punishments for drug offenses. The truth is, it’s hard to get your life back on track with a drug charge on your record. Your freedom and way of life could be in the hands of your criminal defense attorney. As such, you need a competent lawyer with years of experience handling drug cases. Leaving your fate in the hands of an incompetent attorney could have long-lasting effects on your family and may result in a conviction.

Consequences-for-drug-crimes

Consequences for drug crimes in Skidaway Island often include:

  • Jail
  • Prison
  • Heavy fines
  • Community service
  • Court-ordered drug and alcohol counseling
  • Probation or parole
  • Permanent criminal record

While the consequences for a drug crime in Georgia are serious, there’s reason to be hopeful: O’Brien Law Firm PC is here to fight for you. Remember – being charged with a drug crime is NOT the same thing as being convicted.

Our stellar team has represented many clients facing numerous drug-related charges. While each situation varies, one constant remains the same for clients facing drug charges: a fear of what lies ahead. At O’Brien Law Firm PC our job is to help you overcome the fear of the unknown. We do so by ensuring you understand your charges, the possible outcomes associated with those charges, and the options you need to consider from a criminal defense standpoint.

With more than a decade of experience as Skidaway Island drug crime attorneys, we have the experience and resources to defend you in court no matter what your charges may be, including:

  • Marijuana
  • Crack
  • Cocaine
  • Heroin
  • Methamphetamine
  • Ecstasy

No matter what charge you are facing, our team has the experience and resources to build a comprehensive defense strategy for your drug case in Skidaway Island, GA. Without a criminal defense attorney acting as your advocate, you could be facing very harsh penalties. Here are a few punishments you could be facing for drug crimes in Skidaway Island:

  • Schedule I or Schedule II Drug Possession
    Schedule I or Schedule II Drug Possession:

    Having less than a gram (or one milliliter for liquids) of this type of drug results in a prison term of one to three years. Having four grams or milliliter carries a term of one to eight years.

  • Schedule III, IV, or V Drug Possession
    Schedule III, IV, or V Drug Possession:

    Any substance on this list is punishable by a prison sentence of one to three years.

  • Non-Narcotic Schedule II Drug Possession
    Non-Narcotic Schedule II Drug Possession:

    If you have less than two grams or milliliters of this substance, punishments can be between one year and three years. Having up to four grams or milliliters results in a prison sentence of one to eight years.

  • Possession of Marijuana
    Possession of Marijuana:

    Those who are in possession of less than an ounce of marijuana are subject to a jail sentence of up to 12 months. Fines may be no more than $1,000. Possession of more than an ounce of marijuana can result in a prison term of one to 10 years.

To avoid these life-changing punishments, you must take action now. Contact O’Brien Law Firm today for a consultation about your case.

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Violent Crime Cases

Violent Crime Cases in Skidaway Island, GA

Violent crime offenses in Skidaway Island typically involve some form of bodily harm to another individual, actions committed against an individual’s will, or threatening someone with bodily harm. Aggravated violent offenses are more severe charges and often occur when a violent crime is made more serious due to circumstances like deadly weapons.

Much like serious drug cases, violent crimes create an added layer of negativity that follows the accused for the rest of their life. In these cases, even an accusation is enough to cause irreparable damage to a person’s reputation. Those convicted of a violent crime face severe penalties that can include years in a correctional facility.

Common crimes of this nature include but are not limited to:
  • Murder
  • Assault with the intent to murder
  • Vehicular homicide
  • Domestic violence
  • Assault
  • Battery
  • Kidnapping
  • Rape
  • Robbery
  • Carjacking

When you are accused of any of the above crimes, your freedom hangs in the balance. The outcome of your case will determine whether you leave the courtroom with your freedom intact or stripped away to serve time behind bars. Because the punishments for violent crimes are so extreme, you should be seeking legal counsel from a criminal defense attorney in Skidaway Island, GA, as soon as possible. As a former police officer with a long record of positive verdicts in violent crime cases, Dennis O’Brien is well equipped to represent you in court.

Having a criminal defense lawyer by your side is the best way to avoid the serious punishments associated with violent crimes. These punishments usually result in prison time if convicted and include:
Forced rape: 20 years
Armed robbery: Up to 20 years
Simple assault: Up to 12 months
Aggravated assault: 10 to 20 years
Aggravated battery: Up to 20 years
Involuntary manslaughter: One to 20 years
Vehicular homicide Up to 15 years
Murder: Life in prison or the death sentence
Zealous Representation Without Judgement

As a former police officer, Dennis O’Brien has seen the toll it takes on a person when charged with a crime. His time in law enforcement allows him to empathize with his clients who desperately need competent representation. Despite being innocent until proven guilty, accusations are scary, and conviction could be a reality. That is why you must work with a trustworthy criminal defense lawyer in Skidaway Island, GA who will work tirelessly to clear your name.

Clients choose O’Brien Law Firm because we believe in open communication, honesty, and hard work. It is not our job to act as judges for those who have been accused of crimes. Rather, our goal is to find the best defense that allows us to protect our clients’ rights and freedoms.

DUI Cases in Skidaway Island, GA

Driving under the influence (DUI) is one of the most common crimes committed in Georgia. Punishments for such a crime can be severe, and for understandable reasons – when a person operates a vehicle while they are intoxicated, they’re putting their life and the lives of others at risk.

While DUI is a serious crime that completely upend the accused’s life, the earnest desire to end drunk driving can make police officers too eager to catch a person who they believe is under the influence.

DUI Cases

The city of Skidaway Island, Georgia, has implemented severe punishments for DUI, even for first-time offenders. Individuals charged with DUI in Skidaway Island could face:

  • Very expensive fines and fees
  • Loss of license
  • Incarceration

Fortunately, if you or someone you love has been charged with DUI, there is hope. This is particularly true when the accused is administered a breath or blood test for DUI. In fact, cases that involve a breath and/or blood test are beaten daily. When you hire O’Brien Law Firm PC, we will dive deep into your DUI case in Skidaway Island and examine every angle possible for your case to be dismissed. Here are just a few questions our team will investigate:

  • Was the stop legal? If not, your case could be dismissed
  • Is there enough evidence or probable cause to arrest you? If not, Dennis O’Brien will file a pre-trial motion and will fight hard to have your case dismissed before trial.
  • Did the police read you your implied consent rights? If not, your case could be thrown out. Failure to read implied consent rights to the accused is one of the most common police errors.
  • Were your blood testing records and breathalyzer results maintained? Breath testing comes with inherent weaknesses that can create doubt in a juror’s mind.

There are numerous ways to beat a DUI case in Georgia, from unreliable field sobriety tests to inaccurate state-administered breath tests. As a veteran criminal defense lawyer in Skidaway Island, GA, Dennis O’Brien has the knowledge and experience to expose the state’s mistakes and fight for your rights. When you hire O’Brien Law Firm PC your chances of dismissal are greatly increased. When your case is dismissed, you can continue living life without the burden of a criminal record.

If you or someone you love is accused of a crime in Skidaway Island, GA, don’t leave fate up to the prosecution. Take the necessary steps to protect yourself and your family before it’s too late.

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Latest News in Skidaway Island

‘Sisters on the Fly’ caravan tour coming to Tybee Island

TYBEE ISLAND, Ga. (WTOC) - If you spot an old camper fixed up for the holidays, you might have found a member of this group. Sisters on the Fly is the largest women’s outdoor group in the country and dozens of its members are coming to Tybee Island for a Christmas Caravan Tour.Tons of vintage trailers will be parked at River’s End Campground this weekend with their doors open. You will get the chance to take a look inside and meet the women who say they want to inspire others to camp, travel, fish and explore the outdoors....

TYBEE ISLAND, Ga. (WTOC) - If you spot an old camper fixed up for the holidays, you might have found a member of this group. Sisters on the Fly is the largest women’s outdoor group in the country and dozens of its members are coming to Tybee Island for a Christmas Caravan Tour.

Tons of vintage trailers will be parked at River’s End Campground this weekend with their doors open. You will get the chance to take a look inside and meet the women who say they want to inspire others to camp, travel, fish and explore the outdoors.

“Everybody loves to see these trailers,” said Susan Kelleher with Sisters on the Fly.

Decked out in holiday décor, more than 30 vintage trailers will be open this weekend for tours.

“One cuter than the next.”

The trailers are being brought to the island by members of the national organization, ‘Sisters on the Fly.’

“They started out as just girls who love to camp.”

Susan Kelleher is a business owner on Tybee Island and is also a 10-year member of the southeast division of ‘Sisters on the Fly.’ She says the organization was started out west for women with similar hobbies - camping and fly fishing. Now, she says, there are about 20,000 members.

“Idea caught on and more and more women wanted to join.”

Kelleher says one of the unique elements of the organization is that the women camp in renovated vintage trailers. Trailers many people enjoy taking a peek inside of.

“They all love to talk about their trailers. How they fixed them up, what they did to them, what their themes are, there’s cool painting on the outside. All around the trailers they’ll have all their vintage collections.”

Kelleher says she wanted to use their trip to Tybee as a way to raise money for a local nonprofit. She says when you buy a ticket for a trailer tour, the money will go toward the Tybee Post Theater.

“Without support like that we will not be able to do things in this space,” said Evan Goetz, Executive Director of the Tybee Post Theater.

Goetz says now that the theater is 100 percent up and running again, this money will help fund them in many ways.

“It pays for our staff too. We pay our concession stand workers and our house managers and our technical person. Any little funds like that just helps us operate and keep our doors open,” Goetz said.

Trailer tours are on Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. If you’d like to buy a ticket you can do so on the Tybee Post Theater’s website or at the Seaside Sisters store on HWY 80. Sisters on the Fly will also be walking in the island’s Christmas parade this Friday.

Find out more about Sisters on the Fly by clicking here.

Copyright 2021 WTOC. All rights reserved.

Tybee Island's new fire chief Jeremy Kendrick said 'taking care of the people' is his goal

Tybee Island Fire Department's (TIFD) new fire chief, Jeremy Kendrick, kicked off his first day on the job on Monday. The department was without a chief for nearly half a year after the previous head, Matt Harrell, resigned in June amid sexual harassment and bullying allegations. Kendrick, a Georgia native with 2...

Tybee Island Fire Department's (TIFD) new fire chief, Jeremy Kendrick, kicked off his first day on the job on Monday. The department was without a chief for nearly half a year after the previous head, Matt Harrell, resigned in June amid sexual harassment and bullying allegations. Kendrick, a Georgia native with 25 years experience under his belt, said his goal is to "uplift the team's motivation and give the department a fresh look" for the future.

"The job of the fire chief is to take care of people and that's going to be my goal," said Kendrick.

Previous plans for Chatham Emergency Management Services (CEMS) to provide an interim fire chief did not go through. Instead, TIFD lieutenants handled day-to-day operations as the city fast tracked its search for a replacement.

During that period, Tybee Island City Manager Shawn Gillen said he's been working with the HR director and employee focus groups to develop new policies and additional training to create the avenues where people can report similar issues about workplace behavior.

Gillen said a review board made up of city staff and community members interviewed about five individuals after selecting candidates from dozens of applications from across the Southeast. After rounds of interviews and a shadowing period for each candidate, it was Kendrick who stood out as the best fit, said Gillen.

"It was a tough decision," he said, "It was a good problem to have, to pick from great candidates like that."

Kendrick, who is coming off a two-and-a-half year stint as the division chief at the Southern California Logistics Fire Department, said he is excited to reunite with his family in Georgia and work on Tybee Island, which he frequented as a child.

"I really put my heart and soul into it and it felt like it was the right thing," said Kendrick.

Gillen said Kendrick's Georgia roots and extensive experience ultimately led to the panel's decision.

"What impressed us a lot about Jeremy was that he saw every issue that we have been seeing...he also recognized a lot of things that we don't know about," said Gillen, "He was able to make a very thorough assessment in a three-day period."

Both Kendrick and Gillen said increasing the TIFD's services, namely emergency services, will be a long-term goal. Currently, Chatham Emergency Management Services (CEMS) serves the city and usually stations one emergency ambulance on the island. When that ambulance is dispatched, another cover unit is sent in, according to CEMS CEO Chuck Kearns.

Read more:HR investigation of former Tybee Island fire chief officially closes, proved inconclusive

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"Tybee is a big tourist area and the potential for emergency services is really there with the amount of population that comes in," said Kendrick.

Tybee has a permanent population of a little more than 3,000 residents, which can multiply ten times over the weekend during the tourist season, putting a strain on the island's public safety departments. The fire department currently employs 15 full-time fire fighters along with part-timers. About three to four employees are on each shift, said Gillen.

Gillen added that the fire department has come a long way from three years ago when there were just three full-time firefighters. "And even before that, it was all volunteer," said Gillen.

"We are in a unique position being so isolated," said Gillen, "It's an ongoing challenge so we're looking at what we can do here locally and what we can do partnering with Chatham Fire (CEMS)."

At his previous post with Southern California Logistics Fire Department, Kendrick said he oversaw daily operations including fire suppression and services with the city of Victorville, the Federal Aviation Administration side of the airport, deployments for special assignments with the military, as well as other special operations.

His past experience also includes a stint as captain with the Sallyport Global Holdings Fire Service in the Kirkuk Iraq Department of Defense and a brief period with the Savannah River Site Department of Energy.

After two-and-a-half decades, Kendrick said one of the most important things he's learned in the field is humility.

"The day you think you know it all is the day you need to go home and retire," said Kendrick."

The other big lesson, he said, is respecting personnel no matter their rank.

"One thing that I can say that has really been successful for the fire service is having trust and a bond with your personnel and knowing that you've got their back and they've got your back," said Kendrick, "I want to treat everybody with the same respect...it's just paramount for any department or organization."

Nancy Guan is the general assignment reporter covering Chatham County municipalities. Reach her at nguan@gannett.com or on Twitter @nancyguann.

Tybee Island announces winning license plate design, urges people to pre-order

Georgia drivers are one step closer to being able to showcase the Tybee Island lighthouse on their license plates. The city announced the winning plate design on Thursday, which features the state's oldest and tallest lighthouse against a clear blue sky.A panel of four judges including State Rep. Jesse Petrea (R-Savannah), who sponsored the license plate bill, and Tybee Island Mayor Shirley Sessions...

Georgia drivers are one step closer to being able to showcase the Tybee Island lighthouse on their license plates. The city announced the winning plate design on Thursday, which features the state's oldest and tallest lighthouse against a clear blue sky.

A panel of four judges including State Rep. Jesse Petrea (R-Savannah), who sponsored the license plate bill, and Tybee Island Mayor Shirley Sessions voted between two finalists. The group chose the design that reflects a more realistic portrayal of the city's centuries-old lightstation.

"The lighthouse is definitely a beacon, not only for Tybee, but also for Georgia," said Sessions.

Previous story:Tybee Island Lighthouse could be on Georgia license plates, final design is up for a vote

Residents aren't able to tack the plate onto their cars just yet. In order for the new tag to become available to drivers, 1,000 pre-orders must be made in order for the bill to pass in the 2022 legislative session. Right now there's 350, said Tybee Island Historical Society (TIHS) Executive Director Sarah Jones.

Pre-orders must be made by January 2022 on tybeelighthouse.org.

Partial proceeds from the sales will go towards the TIHS, which will aid in the repainting of the lighthouse in the upcoming years, a $500,000 endeavor, according to Jones.

"I know Tybee is just one of those communities that gets in there in the ninth hour and gets it done," said Jones.

The plates are $27 to pre-order, $25 of which will go to the Tybee Island Historical Society. The other $2 pays for the online processing of the pre-order.

If the bill passes the 2022 legislative session, $25 from the pre-order will be deducted from the $55 total cost of the plate. If the bill doesn't pass, order holders don't get their money back. It will be considered a donation to the TIHS.

Jones points out that if the bill passes it will be a sustainable funding system for the TIHS. Every year people renew their tag, a percentage of the fee will continue to go towards the organization.

Petrea, who grew up on Isle of Hope, notes that this will be the first Georgia license plate to have a lighthouse design.

"I wanted to allow people to have a really neat, beautiful new tag that they didn't have previously," said Petrea, "and to do it in such a way that we help support the organization that preserves and protects it."

Nancy Guan is the general assignment reporter covering Chatham County municipalities. Reach her at nguan@gannett.com or on Twitter @nancyguann.

Thousands of cannonball jellyfish pile up on Tybee Island's north end

Walking along Tybee beach Friday after work, Jodi Moody saw a few jellyfish in the surf. Then she rounded the north end of the island. A few turned into "a jamboree of jellyfish."Thousands of cannonball jellyfish had washed up, covering an area several yards wide all the way down the beach."It was a little intimidating, honestly, because I've never seen that, Moody said Monday. "And I do walk at the beach pretty frequently for years now, and had not seen that."She posted her photos...

Walking along Tybee beach Friday after work, Jodi Moody saw a few jellyfish in the surf. Then she rounded the north end of the island. A few turned into "a jamboree of jellyfish."

Thousands of cannonball jellyfish had washed up, covering an area several yards wide all the way down the beach.

"It was a little intimidating, honestly, because I've never seen that, Moody said Monday. "And I do walk at the beach pretty frequently for years now, and had not seen that."

She posted her photos to Facebook and garnered hundreds of reactions.

The fact of them washing up was not as unusual as the quantity of them, Tybee Island City Manager Shawn Gillen said.

"It happens every year, maybe not as concentrated in one single area as that," he said.

Cannonball jellyfish can't swim. Instead they go where the winds and currents take them. A strong easterly wind on Friday pushed the jellyfish onshore, not only on Tybee but other Georgia beaches as well, including Jekyll, said Tyler Jones, a spokesman for the Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

More:After study of local plastic pollution, Savannah group proposes limit to help turtles, birds

"It's just a regular occurrence," Jones said. "It isn't like a sign of the apocalypse or anything."

Cannonballs are most prominent species of jellyfish in the Southeast, according to the Ga DNR web site. During the summer and fall they make up over 16% of biomass on the coastline.

"They primarily eat zooplankton and red drum larvae," the web site notes. "When disturbed or threatened, the cannonball jellyfish will secrete a toxic mucus that will harm small fish, and drive away most predators."

More:Summertime dredging in Georgia threatens sea turtles; Corps allowed to kill 214 loggerheads

Although they're generally considered to be non-stinging and no threat to beachgoers, Tybee Island Public Works Director Danny Carpenter advises people to avoid handling them.

"If you're allergic the sting (from the mucus) can be significant," he said.

Sea turtles eat cannonballs and so do some people. In fact, cannonball jellyfish are the second largest fishery in Georgia by weight, Tyler said. Using shrimp trawlers, fishermen scoop up massive quantities of cannonballs. They're processed in Darien then exported, mostly to Asian markets where dried jellyfish are prized for their texture.

By Monday on Tybee's north end, the odor of the washed up jellyfish announced their presence as they decomposed. But Tybee does not plan to remove them.

"They wash up on the beach and they get stranded there and become food for the birds and the crabs," Gillen said. "And then the next tide will wash them out or they'll get buried in the sand. We just let nature take its course."

Mary Landers is the environment and health reporter at the Savannah Morning News. Contact her at 912-655-8295. Twitter: @MaryLandersSMN

Thousands of cannonball jellyfish pile up on the shores of Tybee Island in Georgia

Walking along the beach at Tybee Island in Georgia on Friday after work, Jodi Moody saw a few jellyfish in the surf. Then she rounded the north end of the island. A few turned into "a jamboree of jellyfish."Thousands of cannonball jellyfish had washed up, covering an area several yards wide all the way down the beach."It was a little intimidating, honestly, because I've never seen that," Moody said Monday. "And I do walk at the beach pretty frequently for years now, and had not seen that....

Walking along the beach at Tybee Island in Georgia on Friday after work, Jodi Moody saw a few jellyfish in the surf. Then she rounded the north end of the island. A few turned into "a jamboree of jellyfish."

Thousands of cannonball jellyfish had washed up, covering an area several yards wide all the way down the beach.

"It was a little intimidating, honestly, because I've never seen that," Moody said Monday. "And I do walk at the beach pretty frequently for years now, and had not seen that."

She posted her photos to Facebook and garnered hundreds of reactions.

That the jellyfish washed up was not as unusual as the quantity of them, Tybee Island City Manager Shawn Gillen said.

"It happens every year, maybe not as concentrated in one single area as that," he said.

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Cannonball jellyfish can't swim. Instead, they go where the winds and currents take them. A strong easterly wind on Friday pushed the jellyfish onshore, not only on Tybee, but other Georgia beaches as well, said Tyler Jones, a spokesman for the Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

"It's just a regular occurrence," Jones said. "It isn't like a sign of the apocalypse or anything."

Cannonballs are the most prominent species of jellyfish in the Southeast, according to Georgia's DNR website. During the summer and fall, they make up over 16% of biomass on the coastline.

"They primarily eat zooplankton and red drum larvae," the website says. "When disturbed or threatened, the cannonball jellyfish will secrete a toxic mucus that will harm small fish, and drive away most predators."

Although they're generally considered to be non-stinging and no threat to beachgoers, Tybee Island Public Works Director Danny Carpenter advises people to avoid handling them.

"If you're allergic, the sting (from the mucus) can be significant," he said.

Sea turtles eat cannonballs and so do some people. In fact, cannonball jellyfish are the second-largest fishery in Georgia by weight, Tyler said. Using shrimp trawlers, fishermen scoop up massive quantities of cannonballs. They're processed in Darien, then exported, mostly to Asian markets, where dried jellyfish are prized for their texture.

By Monday on Tybee's north end, the odor of the washed up jellyfish announced their presence as they decomposed. But Tybee does not plan to remove them.

"They wash up on the beach and they get stranded there and become food for the birds and the crabs," Gillen said. "And then the next tide will wash them out or they'll get buried in the sand. We just let nature take its course."

Mary Landers is the environment and health reporter at the Savannah Morning News. Contact her at 912-655-8295. Twitter: @MaryLandersSMN

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