Criminal Defense Attorney in Port Wentworth, GA.

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If you are accused of a crime, the only thing standing between your freedom and a verdict of “guilty” is an experienced criminal defense attorney in Port Wentworth, GA.

Those who have been arrested before know that life in the legal system is no laughing matter. Aside from the imminent ramifications of fines and jail time, any goals you have of bettering yourself and advancing your life could be compromised. Without a trusted attorney by your side, you could face a lifetime of embarrassment and poor employment prospects due to a tarnished criminal record.

The good news? Dennis O’Brien and his team of experienced lawyers in Port Wentworth are ready to clear your name. By retaining the help of a criminal defense attorney early in the legal process, you have a much better chance of securing your freedom and living a life as a productive member of society.

At O’Brien Law Firm PC, our practice was founded to fight for the rights of individuals accused of or charged with a crime. Our team of legal experts is well-equipped to take even the most difficult, contentious cases. From violent felonies to DUI, there is nothing we haven’t seen and handled. As a former law enforcement officer, founding attorney Dennis O’Brien knows exactly how much a person can lose if convicted. That’s why we work tirelessly to secure a verdict that is favorable for our clients.

Regardless of how serious or minor your case may be, know that we will fight fearlessly on your behalf. You deserve zealous representation – when you hire O’Brien Law Firm PC, you will receive nothing less.

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The O’Brien Law Firm PC Difference

Many of our clients are surprised to discover that founding lawyer Dennis O’Brien was a police officer prior to his criminal defense career. As a former Field Training Officer for the Memphis Police Department, he has over two decades of knowledge and experience in the criminal justice system. Dennis truly understands the nuance and complexities involved in a criminal defense case. This rare experience gives Dennis a clear edge in any criminal defense case and gives clients priceless peace of mind when they need it the most. Unlike some criminal defense attorneys in Port Wentworth, Dennis O’Brien and his team believe that every client deserves effective, empathetic legal assistance. While some Port Wentworth criminal defense firms will take weekends off or pass along cases to paralegals, Dennis personally reviews each of his cases. There is no case too small or big for O’Brien Law Firm PC. When you hire our firm, you can rest easy knowing that we will be by your side when the going gets tough.

The OBrien Law Firm PC Difference
Here are just a few reasons why O’Brien Law Firm PC is Port Wentworth’s top choice in criminal defense:
  • Vigorous Representation
  • Fierce Dedication to Clients
  • Unmatched Experience
  • Face-to-Face Counsel
  • Prompt Response to Inquiries and Questions
  • Commitment to Defending Your Rights
  • Thorough, Effective Research and Investigation
  • Contact Us or Call: 912.704.5150
Our firm has represented hundreds of criminal defense clients
Our firm has represented hundreds of criminal defense clients in Port Wentworth and is highly qualified to take your case. Some of our specialties include:

Drug Cases in Port Wentworth, GA

When you are charged with a drug crime in Port Wentworth, it can change your life forever. Georgia imposes very strict punishments for drug offenses. The truth is, it’s hard to get your life back on track with a drug charge on your record. Your freedom and way of life could be in the hands of your criminal defense attorney. As such, you need a competent lawyer with years of experience handling drug cases. Leaving your fate in the hands of an incompetent attorney could have long-lasting effects on your family and may result in a conviction.

Consequences-for-drug-crimes

Consequences for drug crimes in Port Wentworth often include:

  • Jail
  • Prison
  • Heavy fines
  • Community service
  • Court-ordered drug and alcohol counseling
  • Probation or parole
  • Permanent criminal record

While the consequences for a drug crime in Georgia are serious, there’s reason to be hopeful: O’Brien Law Firm PC is here to fight for you. Remember – being charged with a drug crime is NOT the same thing as being convicted.

Our stellar team has represented many clients facing numerous drug-related charges. While each situation varies, one constant remains the same for clients facing drug charges: a fear of what lies ahead. At O’Brien Law Firm PC our job is to help you overcome the fear of the unknown. We do so by ensuring you understand your charges, the possible outcomes associated with those charges, and the options you need to consider from a criminal defense standpoint.

With more than a decade of experience as Port Wentworth drug crime attorneys, we have the experience and resources to defend you in court no matter what your charges may be, including:

  • Marijuana
  • Crack
  • Cocaine
  • Heroin
  • Methamphetamine
  • Ecstasy

No matter what charge you are facing, our team has the experience and resources to build a comprehensive defense strategy for your drug case in Port Wentworth, GA. Without a criminal defense attorney acting as your advocate, you could be facing very harsh penalties. Here are a few punishments you could be facing for drug crimes in Port Wentworth:

  • Schedule I or Schedule II Drug Possession
    Schedule I or Schedule II Drug Possession:

    Having less than a gram (or one milliliter for liquids) of this type of drug results in a prison term of one to three years. Having four grams or milliliter carries a term of one to eight years.

  • Schedule III, IV, or V Drug Possession
    Schedule III, IV, or V Drug Possession:

    Any substance on this list is punishable by a prison sentence of one to three years.

  • Non-Narcotic Schedule II Drug Possession
    Non-Narcotic Schedule II Drug Possession:

    If you have less than two grams or milliliters of this substance, punishments can be between one year and three years. Having up to four grams or milliliters results in a prison sentence of one to eight years.

  • Possession of Marijuana
    Possession of Marijuana:

    Those who are in possession of less than an ounce of marijuana are subject to a jail sentence of up to 12 months. Fines may be no more than $1,000. Possession of more than an ounce of marijuana can result in a prison term of one to 10 years.

To avoid these life-changing punishments, you must take action now. Contact O’Brien Law Firm today for a consultation about your case.

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Violent Crime Cases

Violent Crime Cases in Port Wentworth, GA

Violent crime offenses in Port Wentworth typically involve some form of bodily harm to another individual, actions committed against an individual’s will, or threatening someone with bodily harm. Aggravated violent offenses are more severe charges and often occur when a violent crime is made more serious due to circumstances like deadly weapons.

Much like serious drug cases, violent crimes create an added layer of negativity that follows the accused for the rest of their life. In these cases, even an accusation is enough to cause irreparable damage to a person’s reputation. Those convicted of a violent crime face severe penalties that can include years in a correctional facility.

Common crimes of this nature include but are not limited to:
  • Murder
  • Assault with the intent to murder
  • Vehicular homicide
  • Domestic violence
  • Assault
  • Battery
  • Kidnapping
  • Rape
  • Robbery
  • Carjacking

When you are accused of any of the above crimes, your freedom hangs in the balance. The outcome of your case will determine whether you leave the courtroom with your freedom intact or stripped away to serve time behind bars. Because the punishments for violent crimes are so extreme, you should be seeking legal counsel from a criminal defense attorney in Port Wentworth, GA, as soon as possible. As a former police officer with a long record of positive verdicts in violent crime cases, Dennis O’Brien is well equipped to represent you in court.

Having a criminal defense lawyer by your side is the best way to avoid the serious punishments associated with violent crimes. These punishments usually result in prison time if convicted and include:
Forced rape: 20 years
Armed robbery: Up to 20 years
Simple assault: Up to 12 months
Aggravated assault: 10 to 20 years
Aggravated battery: Up to 20 years
Involuntary manslaughter: One to 20 years
Vehicular homicide Up to 15 years
Murder: Life in prison or the death sentence
Zealous Representation Without Judgement

As a former police officer, Dennis O’Brien has seen the toll it takes on a person when charged with a crime. His time in law enforcement allows him to empathize with his clients who desperately need competent representation. Despite being innocent until proven guilty, accusations are scary, and conviction could be a reality. That is why you must work with a trustworthy criminal defense lawyer in Port Wentworth, GA who will work tirelessly to clear your name.

Clients choose O’Brien Law Firm because we believe in open communication, honesty, and hard work. It is not our job to act as judges for those who have been accused of crimes. Rather, our goal is to find the best defense that allows us to protect our clients’ rights and freedoms.

DUI Cases in Port Wentworth, GA

Driving under the influence (DUI) is one of the most common crimes committed in Georgia. Punishments for such a crime can be severe, and for understandable reasons – when a person operates a vehicle while they are intoxicated, they’re putting their life and the lives of others at risk.

While DUI is a serious crime that completely upend the accused’s life, the earnest desire to end drunk driving can make police officers too eager to catch a person who they believe is under the influence.

DUI Cases

The city of Port Wentworth, Georgia, has implemented severe punishments for DUI, even for first-time offenders. Individuals charged with DUI in Port Wentworth could face:

  • Very expensive fines and fees
  • Loss of license
  • Incarceration

Fortunately, if you or someone you love has been charged with DUI, there is hope. This is particularly true when the accused is administered a breath or blood test for DUI. In fact, cases that involve a breath and/or blood test are beaten daily. When you hire O’Brien Law Firm PC, we will dive deep into your DUI case in Port Wentworth and examine every angle possible for your case to be dismissed. Here are just a few questions our team will investigate:

  • Was the stop legal? If not, your case could be dismissed
  • Is there enough evidence or probable cause to arrest you? If not, Dennis O’Brien will file a pre-trial motion and will fight hard to have your case dismissed before trial.
  • Did the police read you your implied consent rights? If not, your case could be thrown out. Failure to read implied consent rights to the accused is one of the most common police errors.
  • Were your blood testing records and breathalyzer results maintained? Breath testing comes with inherent weaknesses that can create doubt in a juror’s mind.

There are numerous ways to beat a DUI case in Georgia, from unreliable field sobriety tests to inaccurate state-administered breath tests. As a veteran criminal defense lawyer in Port Wentworth, GA, Dennis O’Brien has the knowledge and experience to expose the state’s mistakes and fight for your rights. When you hire O’Brien Law Firm PC your chances of dismissal are greatly increased. When your case is dismissed, you can continue living life without the burden of a criminal record.

If you or someone you love is accused of a crime in Port Wentworth, GA, don’t leave fate up to the prosecution. Take the necessary steps to protect yourself and your family before it’s too late.

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Latest News in Port Wentworth

U.S. Sugar-Imperial Sugar deal runs into roadblock

WASHINGTON — The Department of Justice on Nov. 23 filed a civil antitrust lawsuit in the US District Court for the District of Delaware seeking to stop U.S. Sugar Corp.’s proposed acquisition of Imperial Sugar Co. The complaint alleges that the transaction would leave an overwhelming majority of refined sugar sales across the Southeast in the hands of only two producers.“U.S. Sugar and Imperial Sugar are already multibillion-dollar corporations and are seeking to further consolidate an already cozy sugar industry,&rd...

WASHINGTON — The Department of Justice on Nov. 23 filed a civil antitrust lawsuit in the US District Court for the District of Delaware seeking to stop U.S. Sugar Corp.’s proposed acquisition of Imperial Sugar Co. The complaint alleges that the transaction would leave an overwhelming majority of refined sugar sales across the Southeast in the hands of only two producers.

“U.S. Sugar and Imperial Sugar are already multibillion-dollar corporations and are seeking to further consolidate an already cozy sugar industry,” said Jonathan Kanter, assistant attorney general for the DOJ’s Antitrust Division. “Their merger would eliminate aggressive competition in the supply of refined sugar that leads to lower prices, better quality, and more reliable service. This deal substantially lessens competition at a time when global supply chain challenges already threaten steady access to important commodities and goods. The department’s lawsuit seeks to preserve the important competition between U.S. Sugar and Imperial Sugar and protect the resiliency of American domestic sugar supply.”

U.S. Sugar, a privately held agribusiness based in Clewiston, Fla., entered into a definitive agreement to acquire the business and assets of Imperial Sugar Co. from Wilton, Conn.-based Louis Dreyfus Co. on March 24.

Louis Dreyfus acquired Imperial Sugar in 2012 and currently operates a cane sugar refinery at Port Wentworth in Savannah, Ga., and a sugar transfer and liquidation facility in Ludlow, Ky. The transaction includes Imperial Sugar’s consumer-facing sugar brands sold mainly across the southern United States. Imperial Sugar primarily sources raw cane sugar from Central America, South America and the Caribbean.

U.S. Sugar currently plants, harvests and processes sugarcane into about 800,000 tonnes of refined sugar each year. United Sugars Corp. is the marketing partner of U.S. Sugar and markets both industrial and retail sugar from U.S. Sugar. United Sugars Corp. also will market sugar from Imperial sugar once the transaction is completed. United Sugars also markets beet sugar products from American Crystal Sugar Co., Minn-Dak Farmers Cooperative, both in the Red River Valley, and Wyoming Sugar Co. LLC.

The complaint alleges that U.S. Sugar’s proposed acquisition of Imperial Sugar will further consolidate an already concentrated market for refined sugar. If the transaction is allowed to proceed, United Sugars and American Sugar Refining, known more commonly by its Domino brand name, would control the vast majority of refined sugar sales in the region, enhancing the likelihood going forward that they will coordinate with each other and refrain from competing aggressively, the DOJ noted in its complaint.

Port Wentworth District 1 candidates Gabrielle Nelson and Alfonso Ribot announce run

Two candidates have announced runs for an open Port Wentworth City Council seat.Gabrielle Nelson, current Port Wentworth planning commission member, will face off against Alfonso Ribot, CEO of the Metropolitan Savannah Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (MSAVHCC), for the District 1 post in the November election.Donald Hodges resigned from the office in May. He serv...

Two candidates have announced runs for an open Port Wentworth City Council seat.

Gabrielle Nelson, current Port Wentworth planning commission member, will face off against Alfonso Ribot, CEO of the Metropolitan Savannah Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (MSAVHCC), for the District 1 post in the November election.

Donald Hodges resigned from the office in May. He served a little more than a year on the council after being appointed to the seat in Feb. 2020 by Gov. Brian Kemp. Hodges replaced Shari Dyal, who resigned upon moving her residence outside of Port Wentworth.

The top issues voiced by the candidates involved development, as Port Wentworth is one of the fastest growing cities in Georgia, and bringing in more recreational resources.

Nelson, who announced her candidacy in front of city hall on July 9, said there needs to be a check on the number of warehouses being built, especially in residential communities.

"My No. 1 question is, How is it going to impact traffic? Second is, How many employees is it going to bring (for) people within our community?" said Nelson.

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Ribot, who held his announcement at city hall Wednesday night, said city funds need to go toward resources that will benefit residents' quality of life and not just the economic growth of the city.

"We need to seek professionals, people who have done it before that are looking out for the well-being of the Port Wentworth community," said Ribot, "There needs to be a medical facility, recreation, entertainment. We need to bring people in."

Port Wentworth resident Doel Maldonado, who attended Ribot's announcement and met the candidate through various cultural and community events, said his top concerns are traffic and the types of businesses coming into the city.

"Highway 21 is a dangerous track. The roads can use a lot of expansion, or we need an alternate route," said Maldonado. "Also, we need more businesses. Not just chain restaurants, but good eateries with variety."

Nelson, who is a mother of two, emphasized the need for more recreational resources, particularly a library for the younger generation.

"I want to be able to take my own children in our community after school to go do their homework, read, check out a movie," said Nelson.

She said one way to raise additional funds for these types of facilities is through impact fees, specifically on the warehouses being built in Port Wentworth.

"I'd like to see the impact fees pay for the future of our children," said Nelson. "We are not getting a dime from these warehouses that have been coming to our city — and I can only speak to my living in this community — for at least 13 years."

Ribot said he wants to see a downtown Port Wentworth and the creation of a convention and visitor's bureau that specifically works on tourism.

"I want to make this city a great place to live, work and play," said Ribot, who pointed to his experience in the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce organizing community events and marketing small businesses in the Hispanic community.

Ribot, who is currently retired, previously worked with the U.S. Census Bureau as a bilingual partnership specialist. As head of the local Hispanic chamber he recently coordinated vaccination efforts with area nonprofits and St. Joseph's/Candler Hospital. His past experiences include working with at-risk youth, specifically in the Puerto Rican community, in Chicago and Quito, Ecuador.

Ribot has lived in Port Wentworth for about nine months and says he regularly attends the monthly council meetings to take notes on the council's progress.

"They are functioning, but they're functioning at a lower speed than they could be if all the players of the city were in agreement to get things done for the city," said Ribot, "I want to bring in a different way of looking at things. I'm not just going to serve the council, I'm going to serve the residents of my district."

Ribot also noted that, as the city grows, it is also getting more ethnically diverse.

"I have communications with other minority groups. When I tell them something, they know that I'm being honest," said Ribot, who would be one of the few elected officials of Hispanic background in the county if elected.

Nelson, who's been a planning and development commissioner for about a year, has been a Chatham County employee for 13 years. She currently works as a manager in the county's IT department and is part of the Chatham County Democratic Committee board. She says her current and past experiences have continuously informed the way she works with different personalities.

"I've always been looked at as a team builder," said Nelson. "I try to work with individuals to focus on what we can do to improve upon their faults ... to enhance them so that we can turn those negatives into positives."

Nelson is Port Wentworth mayoral candidate Julius Hall's biological daughter, but was raised by adoptive parents. She said she and Hall's campaigns are not associated with each other and she's been contemplating a run since Dyal's resignation in early 2020.

"I need to be able to speak for more than just planning," said Nelson. "There's so much work to be done there."

All municipal candidates will formally qualify for their posts between Aug. 16 and 19 ahead of the Nov. 2 election.

Nancy Guan is the general assignment reporter covering Chatham County municipalities. Reach her at nguan@gannett.com or on Twitter @nancyguann.

Port Wentworth advances rezoning for major warehouse project, clashing with area residents

Plans for the the largest warehouse development in Port Wentworth history are moving forward after the city's council recently approved rezoning amendments.The warehouse park is slated to include 13 buildings on 8.2 million square feet of property and could expand to 11 million square feet should an additional phase be approved, according to Port Wentworth City Manager Edwin Booth.No warehouse tenants have been named yet, but the project is estimated to create between 400 and 800 people new jobs, according to not...

Plans for the the largest warehouse development in Port Wentworth history are moving forward after the city's council recently approved rezoning amendments.

The warehouse park is slated to include 13 buildings on 8.2 million square feet of property and could expand to 11 million square feet should an additional phase be approved, according to Port Wentworth City Manager Edwin Booth.

No warehouse tenants have been named yet, but the project is estimated to create between 400 and 800 people new jobs, according to notes from a Port Wentworth planning commission meeting.

However, the push to rezone the property, known as the Varnedoe-Wiggins Tract, from residential agriculture to planned industrial has drawn opposition from neighbors.

City Council approved the zoning map amendment request for phase two of the project in a July 22 meeting. Council members Mark Stephens and Thomas Barbee opposed the change, which also went against the planning commission's recommendation. That body had unanimously rejected the decision the week before.

An earlier phase of the warehouse project was previously approved by both the planning commission and city council.

Residents in the north end of the city near the proposed warehouse site cited quality of life concerns such as noise, traffic and pollution.

LaRay Benton, a resident who lives on Saussy Road, a residential street that would be bisected by the potential warehouse development, spoke out against the project. He specifically questioned plans to relocate the Saussy Canal, a portion of which sits on his mother's property, he says.

"You have a fiduciary duty to apply federal, state and local law for the best interest of us residents," said Benton.

Council member Glenn Jones says the appropriate federal agencies will ultimately dictate whether or not the development violates any environmental laws or citizens' rights.

"If they see ... that something is wrong, they're not going to approve that," said Jones. "This is the preliminary start up."

The property in question is currently vacant woodland with no buildings or structures and encompasses about 275 acres of wetland areas. A wetlands permit still needs to be approved for the development.

The project is bounded by Georgia 21 on its west side and Georgia 30 on the south. The tract abuts the Effingham and Chatham County line to the northwest.

The Rice Hope neighborhood sits to the east across the property line.

The property is currently split between owners Glenn A. Steele and Anthony Steele; Gary Wiggin; Lynn Jeffers, Sr.; Comer Varnedoe Meadows; Samuel Varnedoe, Jr; and James Steele.

During the July 22 council meeting, Phillip McCorkle, who submitted the rezoning application on behalf of the property owners, said the current landowners have a right to sell and develop their land as they see fit.

However, Janet Hester, longtime resident of the nearby Monteith neighborhood, opposed the right to rezone.

"These landowners have the right to sell and develop their land, and I will not argue that point," said Hester, "but they do not have the right to have it rezoned to destroy the neighbors who live near there."

McCorkle said there will be minimum impact on the residents of Saussy Road and that the closest warehouse would be 1,500 feet away from the closest home. He also stated there would be a 100-foot buffer with a 15-foot-high berm between the property and the residents.

McCorkle also addressed property tax increase concerns, saying that the Chatham County Board of Assessors have determined "the rezoning of a large undeveloped tract of land adjacent to or near residential properties would not impact the ... tax evaluation of a residential property."

Tonya Brown, who lives on Berrien Road, a street to the southeast side of the proposed development, said the project will not only bring more cars, but also trucks, which would exacerbate congestion problems.

"It's horrendous trying to get out in the morning as it is," said Brown. "Now we have trucks to contend with on top of the additional 800 employees who will work in these warehouses, on top of the traffic that's coming through from Effingham County on top of the travelers that run up and down I-95 on top of the residents that live here."

Brown said she was born and raised in Port Wentworth and has seen warehouses and traffic steadily increase over the years.

"It comes down to the money and I know that the city may need it, but there are better ways to get it," said Brown.

According to the city manager, there are about 10 other large-scale developments currently proposed for Port Wentworth.

Nancy Guan is the general assignment reporter covering Chatham County municipalities. Reach her at nguan@gannett.com or on Twitter @nancyguann.

Port Wentworth Chamber of Commerce hosts city council candidate forum

SAVANNAH, Ga. (WTOC) - Port Wentworth is preparing for election day with a city council candidate forum. Port Wentworth Chamber of Commerce hosted this forum tonight at The Wingate by Wyndham hotel.Five of the Candidates attended the forum. Mayor Gary Norton and At large Council woman Linda Smith did not respond to the forum invitation. District 3 council candidate Lynwood Griner declined the invitation to attend. The participants focused on many ways to improve Port Wentworth. They discussed traffic problems,city growth and how to br...

SAVANNAH, Ga. (WTOC) - Port Wentworth is preparing for election day with a city council candidate forum. Port Wentworth Chamber of Commerce hosted this forum tonight at The Wingate by Wyndham hotel.

Five of the Candidates attended the forum. Mayor Gary Norton and At large Council woman Linda Smith did not respond to the forum invitation. District 3 council candidate Lynwood Griner declined the invitation to attend. The participants focused on many ways to improve Port Wentworth. They discussed traffic problems,city growth and how to bring businesses to their community. When asked how they would encourage businesses to move to Port Wentworth, this is what they had to say.

“We want to encourage them to come open up their brick and mortar stores in Port Wentworth and attract those folks from all these other cities into Port Wentworth,” said district three candidate Janet Hester.

“Maybe give them a tax break incentive or give them some relief on a property because right now we don’t have anything to entice businesses to come here fast food is good but we want to spend our money in Port Wentworth,” said district three candidate Rufus Bright.

" Providing them extensive incentives for certain types of businesses so that they can come in and they’ll find a way that they can actually succeed here and the local economy and those can be in the means of tax rates tax abatement’s and things of that sort,” said district one candidate Alfonso Ribot.

“To see what we can do out here to get them to move out here I don’t know if it’s after afraid of the traffic or if they’re afraid of the lack of business space but we’re here and we’re ready,” said district one candidate Gabrielle Nelson.

“Ticket should not be at 35% of our budget so a lot of people don’t want to come here and a lot of businesses don’t wanna move here because they’re afraid that their customers will get caught up in most traffic tickets are about $700 so it’s extreme,” said at large candidate Jo Smith.

Don’t forget early voting continues in GA through Friday.

Copyright 2021 WTOC. All rights reserved.

Port Wentworth woman credits granddaughter for spotting large breast cancer tumor

PORT WENTWORTH, Ga. (WSAV) – A Port Wentworth woman has her granddaughter to thank this Breast Cancer Awareness Month.Brenda Brown says 7-year-old Brooklynne lives in Indianapolis, Indiana, but was spending time with her in Port Wentworth as she attended school virtually.During playtime one day, Brooklynne noticed something was off.“She was like what is that…what’s going on? Mama, what is that?” Brenda recalled. “And I’m like, ‘It’s nothing, it’s just my breast...

PORT WENTWORTH, Ga. (WSAV) – A Port Wentworth woman has her granddaughter to thank this Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

Brenda Brown says 7-year-old Brooklynne lives in Indianapolis, Indiana, but was spending time with her in Port Wentworth as she attended school virtually.

During playtime one day, Brooklynne noticed something was off.

“She was like what is that…what’s going on? Mama, what is that?” Brenda recalled. “And I’m like, ‘It’s nothing, it’s just my breast.’

“I didn’t pay any attention, but when I went into the room, I’m like, ‘What is she talking about?’ And I felt it myself and I’m like, ‘Whoa! What is going on?’”

Brenda hit a snag when two hospitals couldn’t offer a mammogram appointment for weeks. Finally, she found hope at St. Joseph’s/Candler Telfair Pavilion.

As it turns out, Brooklynne had spotted a large tumor.

“Just like I’m sitting here now, it was sticking out of my clothes,” Brenda said. “It was sticking out of my breast. It was 10 centimeters.”

Breast surgeon Dr. Susan Mahany and her team at the Telfair Breast Surgery Center joined the lifesaving fight.

“November 17 was my first day of chemo and within two weeks of chemo, I lost all my hair. Everything started falling off,” she shared. “It was really really rough. It was a bad thing, but it was a good thing because these doctors know what you need better than you do.”

Watching her life on edge, battling breast cancer was not the way Brenda wanted to spend her birthday last October.

“I wanted to give up. I’m not gonna sit here and lie to you,” she said. “I wanted to give up but I didn’t. And I had so much love from here from the nurses.”

Now with chemotherapy and radiation complete, Brenda has more family time to look forward to with her grandchildren.

“And I wanna be there for them,” she added. “You know, they play football, they do all kinds of things. So yeah, I have a lot to live for.”

Brenda will celebrate her 65th birthday on Oct. 28 — this year, cancer-free.

It’s Buddy Check 3 Day — and Breast Cancer Awareness Month. WSAV News 3 is On Your Side every third of the month to remind you and your buddies to complete your breast self-exams.

Click or tap here to learn more about the program.

If you have any questions or concerns about breast health, call the Lewis Cancer and Research Pavilion at 912-819-7053.

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