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Drug Attorney Montgomery, GA
State Crimes

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 Drug Defense Lawyer Montgomery, GA
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Learn about our areas of experties involving state crimes, and better understand your rights.

If you are accused of a crime, the only thing standing between your freedom and a verdict of "guilty" is an experienced criminal defense attorney in Montgomery, GA.

Those who have been arrested before know that life in the legal system is no laughing matter. Aside from the imminent ramifications of fines and jail time, any goals you have of bettering yourself and advancing your life could be compromised. Without a trusted attorney by your side, you could face a lifetime of embarrassment and poor employment prospects due to a tarnished criminal record.

The good news? Dennis O'Brien and his team of experienced lawyers in Montgomery are ready to clear your name. By retaining the help of a criminal defense attorney early in the legal process, you have a much better chance of securing your freedom and living a life as a productive member of society.

At O'Brien Law Firm PC, our practice was founded to fight for the rights of individuals accused of or charged with a crime. Our team of legal experts is well-equipped to take even the most difficult, contentious cases. From violent felonies to DUI, there is nothing we haven't seen and handled. As a former law enforcement officer, founding attorney Dennis O'Brien knows exactly how much a person can lose if convicted. That's why we work tirelessly to secure a verdict that is favorable for our clients.

Regardless of how serious or minor your case may be, know that we will fight fearlessly on your behalf. You deserve zealous representation - when you hire O'Brien Law Firm PC, you will receive nothing less.

 Drug Lawyer Montgomery, GA
Service Areas

The O'Brien Law Firm PC Difference

Many of our clients are surprised to discover that founding lawyer Dennis O'Brien was a police officer prior to his criminal defense career. As a former Field Training Officer for the Memphis Police Department, he has over two decades of knowledge and experience in the criminal justice system. Dennis truly understands the nuance and complexities involved in a criminal defense case. This rare experience gives Dennis a clear edge in any criminal defense case and gives clients priceless peace of mind when they need it the most. Unlike some criminal defense attorneys in Montgomery, Dennis O'Brien and his team believe that every client deserves effective, empathetic legal assistance. While some Montgomery criminal defense firms will take weekends off or pass along cases to paralegals, Dennis personally reviews each of his cases. There is no case too small or big for O'Brien Law Firm PC. When you hire our firm, you can rest easy knowing that we will be by your side when the going gets tough.

 Federal Defense Attorney Montgomery, GA
Here are just a few reasons why O'Brien Law Firm PC is Montgomery's top choice in criminal defense:
  • Vigorous Representation
  • Fierce Dedication to Clients
  • Unmatched Experience
  • Face-to-Face Counsel
  • Prompt Response to Inquiries and Questions
  • Commitment to Defending Your Rights
  • Thorough, Effective Research and Investigation
  • Contact Us or Call: 912-704-5150
 Criminal Defense Law Firms Montgomery, GA
Our firm has represented hundreds of criminal defense clients in Montgomery and is highly qualified to take your case. Some of our specialties include:

Drug Cases in Montgomery, GA

When you are charged with a drug crime in Montgomery, it can change your life forever. Georgia imposes very strict punishments for drug offenses. The truth is, it's hard to get your life back on track with a drug charge on your record. Your freedom and way of life could be in the hands of your criminal defense attorney. As such, you need a competent lawyer with years of experience handling drug cases. Leaving your fate in the hands of an incompetent attorney could have long-lasting effects on your family and may result in a conviction.

 Criminal Defense Lawyers Montgomery, GA

Consequences for drug crimes in Montgomery often include:

  • Jail
  • Prison
  • Heavy fines
  • Community service
  • Court-ordered drug and alcohol counseling
  • Probation or parole
  • Permanent criminal record

While the consequences for a drug crime in Georgia are serious, there's reason to be hopeful: O'Brien Law Firm PC is here to fight for you. Remember - being charged with a drug crime is NOT the same thing as being convicted.

Our stellar team has represented many clients facing numerous drug-related charges. While each situation varies, one constant remains the same for clients facing drug charges: a fear of what lies ahead. At O'Brien Law Firm PC our job is to help you overcome the fear of the unknown. We do so by ensuring you understand your charges, the possible outcomes associated with those charges, and the options you need to consider from a criminal defense standpoint.

With more than a decade of experience as Montgomery drug crime attorneys, we have the experience and resources to defend you in court no matter what your charges may be, including:

  • Marijuana
  • Crack
  • Cocaine
  • Heroin
  • Methamphetamine
  • Ecstasy

No matter what charge you are facing, our team has the experience and resources to build a comprehensive defense strategy for your drug case in Montgomery, GA. Without a criminal defense attorney acting as your advocate, you could be facing very harsh penalties. Here are a few punishments you could be facing for drug crimes in Montgomery:

  • Schedule I or Schedule II Drug Possession
    Schedule I or Schedule II Drug Possession:

    Having less than a gram (or one milliliter for liquids) of this type of drug results in a prison term of one to three years. Having four grams or milliliter carries a term of one to eight years.

  • Schedule III, IV, or V Drug Possession
    Schedule III, IV, or V Drug Possession:

    Any substance on this list is punishable by a prison sentence of one to three years.

  • Non-Narcotic Schedule II Drug Possession
    Non-Narcotic Schedule II Drug Possession:

    If you have less than two grams or milliliters of this substance, punishments can be between one year and three years. Having up to four grams or milliliters results in a prison sentence of one to eight years.

  • Possession of Marijuana
    Possession of Marijuana:

    Those who are in possession of less than an ounce of marijuana are subject to a jail sentence of up to 12 months. Fines may be no more than $1,000. Possession of more than an ounce of marijuana can result in a prison term of one to 10 years.

To avoid these life-changing punishments, you must take action now. Contact O'Brien Law Firm today for a consultation about your case.

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 Defense Lawyers Montgomery, GA
 Criminal Defense Attorney Montgomery, GA

Violent Crime Cases in Montgomery, GA

Violent crime offenses in Montgomery typically involve some form of bodily harm to another individual, actions committed against an individual's will, or threatening someone with bodily harm. Aggravated violent offenses are more severe charges and often occur when a violent crime is made more serious due to circumstances like deadly weapons.

Much like serious drug cases, violent crimes create an added layer of negativity that follows the accused for the rest of their life. In these cases, even an accusation is enough to cause irreparable damage to a person's reputation. Those convicted of a violent crime face severe penalties that can include years in a correctional facility.

Common crimes of this nature include but are not limited to:
  • Murder
  • Assault with the intent to murder
  • Vehicular homicide
  • Domestic violence
  • Assault
  • Battery
  • Kidnapping
  • Rape
  • Robbery
  • Carjacking

When you are accused of any of the above crimes, your freedom hangs in the balance. The outcome of your case will determine whether you leave the courtroom with your freedom intact or stripped away to serve time behind bars. Because the punishments for violent crimes are so extreme, you should be seeking legal counsel from a criminal defense attorney in Montgomery, GA, as soon as possible. As a former police officer with a long record of positive verdicts in violent crime cases, Dennis O'Brien is well equipped to represent you in court.

Having a criminal defense lawyer by your side is the best way to avoid the serious punishments associated with violent crimes. These punishments usually result in prison time if convicted and include:
Forced rape: 20 years
Armed robbery: Up to 20 years
Simple assault: Up to 12 months
Aggravated assault: 10 to 20 years
Aggravated battery: Up to 20 years
Involuntary manslaughter: One to 20 years
Vehicular homicide Up to 15 years
Murder: Life in prison or the death sentence
Zealous Representation Without Judgement

As a former police officer, Dennis O'Brien has seen the toll it takes on a person when charged with a crime. His time in law enforcement allows him to empathize with his clients who desperately need competent representation. Despite being innocent until proven guilty, accusations are scary, and conviction could be a reality. That is why you must work with a trustworthy criminal defense lawyer in Montgomery, GA who will work tirelessly to clear your name.

Clients choose O'Brien Law Firm because we believe in open communication, honesty, and hard work. It is not our job to act as judges for those who have been accused of crimes. Rather, our goal is to find the best defense that allows us to protect our clients' rights and freedoms.

DUI Cases in Montgomery, GA

Driving under the influence (DUI) is one of the most common crimes committed in Georgia. Punishments for such a crime can be severe, and for understandable reasons - when a person operates a vehicle while they are intoxicated, they're putting their life and the lives of others at risk.

While DUI is a serious crime that completely upend the accused's life, the earnest desire to end drunk driving can make police officers too eager to catch a person who they believe is under the influence.

 Criminal Defense Law Firm Montgomery, GA

The city of Montgomery, Georgia, has implemented severe punishments for DUI, even for first-time offenders. Individuals charged with DUI in Montgomery could face:

  • Very expensive fines and fees
  • Loss of license
  • Incarceration

Fortunately, if you or someone you love has been charged with DUI, there is hope. This is particularly true when the accused is administered a breath or blood test for DUI. In fact, cases that involve a breath and/or blood test are beaten daily. When you hire O'Brien Law Firm PC, we will dive deep into your DUI case in Montgomery and examine every angle possible for your case to be dismissed. Here are just a few questions our team will investigate:

  • Was the stop legal? If not, your case could be dismissed
  • Is there enough evidence or probable cause to arrest you? If not, Dennis O'Brien will file a pre-trial motion and will fight hard to have your case dismissed before trial.
  • Did the police read you your implied consent rights? If not, your case could be thrown out. Failure to read implied consent rights to the accused is one of the most common police errors.
  • Were your blood testing records and breathalyzer results maintained? Breath testing comes with inherent weaknesses that can create doubt in a juror's mind.

There are numerous ways to beat a DUI case in Georgia, from unreliable field sobriety tests to inaccurate state-administered breath tests. As a veteran criminal defense lawyer in Montgomery, GA, Dennis O'Brien has the knowledge and experience to expose the state's mistakes and fight for your rights. When you hire O'Brien Law Firm PC your chances of dismissal are greatly increased. When your case is dismissed, you can continue living life without the burden of a criminal record.

 Criminal Justice Attorney Montgomery, GA

If you or someone you love is accused of a crime in Montgomery, GA, don't leave fate up to the prosecution. Take the necessary steps to protect yourself and your family before it's too late.

Contact us

Latest News in Montgomery, GA

How Bo Nix could present Auburn football with an uncomfortable truth | Toppmeyer

This the "Topp Rope," a twice-weekly SEC football column from the USA TODAY Network's Blake Toppmeyer.Bo Nix’s transfer from Auburn to Oregon presented a bittersw...

This the "Topp Rope," a twice-weekly SEC football column from the USA TODAY Network's Blake Toppmeyer.

Bo Nix’s transfer from Auburn to Oregon presented a bittersweet opportunity for the veteran quarterback and also for the program he left after three years as its starter.

Nix, the son of former Auburn quarterback Patrick Nix, signed as a ballyhooed recruit, and he persistently teased the Tigers with tantalizing athleticism and big-play prowess. But Nix kept butting against a ceiling, and he never found the consistency of an elite quarterback.

Nix reunited with Kenny Dillingham, AU’s former offensive coordinator now with the Ducks, while Auburn gained the chance to move on with a new face behind center. The Tigers added two transfer quarterbacks, but T.J. Finley will start the season opener – the same Finley who couldn’t unseat Nix last season.

If Nix dazzles when No. 12 Oregon plays No. 3 Georgia on Saturday (2:30 p.m. CT, ABC), Auburn will be forced to reckon with an uncomfortable reality: Nix wasn’t the chief problem during Bryan Harsin’s debut, and he probably would remain AU's top quarterback had he not transferred.

In Nix’s absence, Auburn needs Harsin’s assessment of Finley to prove accurate.

“People improve," Harsin said of Finley. "And that does include quarterbacks at Auburn."

OPINION:My vow to you -- I won't guarantee Georgia football greatness even if they whip Oregon | Toppmeyer

Nix didn’t improve much under Harsin. If he flourishes at Oregon, Harsin will be left holding a mirror.

Nix’s challenge Saturday will be solving a stingy Georgia secondary. Nix didn’t fare well against Georgia at Auburn. He went 0-3 against the Deep South rival.

Strange as it is, some AU fans may feel more comfortable about the Tigers’ quarterback situation if Georgia intercepts Nix a few times in a rout of Oregon at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta.

Finley throwing for 350 yards against Mercer on Saturday night wouldn’t hurt, either.

Week 1 quick thoughts

FirstBank wants name on Vanderbilt’s stadium … have they seen it?

College athletics directors are in the fundraising business, and Vanderbilt celebrated this week a 10-year naming rights deal to have Vanderbilt Stadium rebranded as FirstBank Stadium.

Vanderbilt follows Kentucky, which in 2017 sold naming rights to turn Commonwealth Stadium into Kroger Field. Some traditionalists may bristle, but I applaud the Commodores for convincing FirstBank that Vanderbilt Stadium is a jewel worth affixing its name to.

Combine this deal with Vanderbilt trouncing Hawaii, and that’s a fine start to the season.

Moneymaking opportunity, Part II

Not to be outdone by Vanderbilt, Missouri also unveiled a revenue-grab.

No, Faurot Field has not been renamed – attention, Commerce Bank, it’s for the taking – but it will feature self-service food lockers where fans can purchase grab-and-go concessions.

I only hope the food is better than a Mizzou pregame meal served in the press box, which a fellow sportswriter once described as “hardtack and gruel.”

[ WANT MORE OPINIONS FROM BLAKE TOPPMEYER?: Subscribe to the SEC Unfiltered newsletter for an exclusive column each week ]

Moneymaking suggestion

Georgia, Oregon and Texas are among programs that didn’t release Week 1 depth charts. This secrecy sacrifices a revenue opportunity.

My suggestion: Put a depth chart behind a paywall on the athletic department website. Cha-ching.

Better yet, sell naming rights for the depth chart. The Georgia Depth Chart, presented by Synovus Bank.

Love this Eliah Drinkwitz idea

Missouri will open Thursday (7 p.m. CT, ESPNU) against Louisiana Tech, and coach Eliah Drinkwitz encouraged students to revel in the weeknight kickoff.

“I say skip (Friday classes),” Drinkwitz suggested on his radio show. “It's early in the year. You can overcome an early deficit."

Love the idea. Go hard in the paint Thursday night, play hooky Friday morning while nursing a hangover, and let the federal government forgive the debt incurred while skipping classes.

Email of the week

Note: Email heavily edited to correct various grammar errors.

Tim writes: You are the one that picked Auburn to have a losing season??? Wow! I would bet my life that don’t happen. Have to give Harson some credit. He knows talent. Not his fault he inherited low-level offensive linemen that weren’t beefed up enough to handle the defensive linemen in the SEC.

Bryce Young would be rated as worst QB in SEC behind that line. If Auburn will give Harsin the normal four-year chance, he will have a sustainable program and be competitive every year. Stay tuned for at least a 9-3 season at AU.

My response: Is this satire? It reads like satire.

Harsin cooked with Gus Malzahn’s goods and managed a season worse than Malzahn would’ve cooked up on his worst day.

Enjoy 6-6.

Please email me your coaching candidates on Halloween. They’ll be needed.

Boozing in Arkansas

While Georgia-Oregon gets top billing, the more competitive top-25 clash will unfold in Fayetteville, Arkansas, where the No. 23 Razorbacks will begin a quest to live up to my dark-horse assertions against No. 22 Cincinnati.

Head Hog Sam Pittman believes in setting the tone in the first quarter.

"I think the first couple series are gonna be really important, to figure out what you're bringing to the party. Some guys bring sweet tea, and some guys bring liquor,” Pittman quipped.

Pittman's drink of choice?

“I like ice tea with a little bit of sugar in it, and I like brown water, too," Pittman said.

Enjoy your boozy sweet tea as Week 1 unfolds.

Blake Toppmeyer is an SEC Columnist for the USA TODAY Network. Email him at BToppmeyer@gannett.com and follow him on Twitter @btoppmeyer. If you enjoy Blake’s coverage, consider a digital subscription that will allow you access to all of it. Also, check out his podcast, SEC Football Unfiltered, or access exclusive columns via the SEC Unfiltered newsletter.

ESPN FPI updates game-by-game predictions for remaining Georgia football schedule

Georgia’s season-opener is in the book and it was a thing of beauty for the defending national champions, beating Oregon by a score of 49-3.With a very navigable slate of games this year, Georgia of course will be favored in every regular season matchup it plays. 12-0 is the expected outcome for the Dawgs this year, not only by analysts but also by the ESPN Football Power Index (FPI).Here is a ...

Georgia’s season-opener is in the book and it was a thing of beauty for the defending national champions, beating Oregon by a score of 49-3.

With a very navigable slate of games this year, Georgia of course will be favored in every regular season matchup it plays. 12-0 is the expected outcome for the Dawgs this year, not only by analysts but also by the ESPN Football Power Index (FPI).

Here is a look at Georgia’s chances of winning each game remaining on its schedule, according to the FPI:

Sept. 10: Samford

Dale Zanine-USA TODAY Sports

Chances of Georgia winning: 99.9%

Projected new record: 2-0

Sept. 17: @ South Carolina

Dale Zanine-USA TODAY Sports

Chances of Georgia winning: 93.2%

Projected new record: 3-0

Sept. 24: Kent State

Brian Losness-USA TODAY Sports

Chances of Georgia winning: 99.5%

Projected new record: 4-0

Oct. 1: @ Missouri

Dale Zanine-USA TODAY Sports

Chances of Georgia winning: 93.0%

Projected new record: 5-0

Oct. 8: Auburn

Syndication: The Montgomery Advertiser

Chances of Georgia winning: 93.4%

Projected new record: 6-0

Oct. 15: Vanderbilt

Christopher Hanewinckel-USA TODAY Sports

Chances of Georgia winning: 98.5%

Projected new record: 7-0

Oct. 29: Florida (Jacksonville)

Nathan Ray Seebeck-USA TODAY Sports

Chances of Georgia winning: 90.6%

Projected new record: 8-0

Nov. 5: Tennessee

Syndication: The Knoxville News-Sentinel

Chances of Georgia winning: 89.1%

Projected new record: 9-0

Nov. 12: @ Mississippi State

Dale Zanine-USA TODAY Sports

Chances of Georgia winning: 82.6%

Projected new record: 10-0

Nov. 19: @ Kentucky

Syndication: Online Athens

Chances of Georgia winning: 85.5%

Projected new record: 11-0

Nov. 26: Georgia Tech

Dale Zanine-USA TODAY Sports

Chances of Georgia winning: 98.1%

Projected new record: 12-0

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Football rankings: Clinch County returns to No. 1; North Cobb Christian enters

The South Georgia small-school power with six state titles this century is 3-0 after a 50-14 victory over Miller County on Friday.Clinch, which finished 3-7 last season, moved into the top spot in Class A Division II after previous No. 1 Schley County lost to then-No. 10 Early County 19-17 on Friday. Early is now No. 2.Other No. 1 teams, including Buford, Fitzgerald and Cartersville, needed second-half comebacks to stay on top, while Hughes, Benedictine, Cedar Grove and Prince Avenue Christian won easily.Nine teams enter...

The South Georgia small-school power with six state titles this century is 3-0 after a 50-14 victory over Miller County on Friday.

Clinch, which finished 3-7 last season, moved into the top spot in Class A Division II after previous No. 1 Schley County lost to then-No. 10 Early County 19-17 on Friday. Early is now No. 2.

Other No. 1 teams, including Buford, Fitzgerald and Cartersville, needed second-half comebacks to stay on top, while Hughes, Benedictine, Cedar Grove and Prince Avenue Christian won easily.

Nine teams entered the rankings.

One was North Cobb Christian in Class 2A. The Lions defeated Wesleyan 19-15, scoring on a last-play, 65-yard touchdown pass with five laterals.

Montgomery County, a Class A Division II school, is ranked for the first time since 1989.

Two teams from northeast Georgia, Elbert County and Stephens County, are ranked for the first time since 2016.

Kennesaw Mountain is ranked in the highest class for the first time after a 37-36 victory over North Paulding. Ty Roland kicked a 25-yard field goal in the final seconds.

Class 7A

1. (1) Buford (3-0)

2. (2) Grayson (3-0)

3. (5) Mill Creek (3-0)

4. (3) Colquitt County (3-0)

5. (6) Collins Hill (2-0)

6. (4) North Cobb (1-1)

7. (8) Carrollton (3-0)

8. (7) Walton (1-1)

9. (NR) Parkview (2-0)

10. (NR) Kennesaw Mountain (3-0)

Out: No. 9 Westlake, No. 10 North Gwinnett

Class 6A

1. (1) Hughes (3-0)

2. (2) Lee County (3-0)

3. (4) Roswell (3-0)

4. (5) Blessed Trinity (2-0)

5. (6) Woodward Academy (1-1)

6. (7) Gainesville (3-0)

7. (3) Rome (2-1)

8. (8) Marist (2-1)

9. (NR) Thomas County Central (3-0)

10. (9) South Paulding (1-1)

Out: No. 10 Douglas County

Class 5A

1. (1) Cartersville (3-0)

2. (2) Warner Robins (1-1)

3. (5) Ware County (2-0)

4. (6) Calhoun (2-1)

5. (4) Creekside (0-2)

6. (8) Dutchtown (3-0)

7. (10) Kell (3-0)

8. (9) Coffee (1-1)

9. (NR) Jefferson (2-1)

10. (3) Jones County (2-1)

Out: No. 7 Flowery Branch

Class 4A

1. (1) Benedictine (2-1)

2. (2) North Oconee (2-0)

3. (3) Cedartown (3-0)

4. (4) Whitewater (3-0)

5. (6) Perry (1-1)

6. (7) Troup (3-0)

7. (8) Starr’s Mill (3-0)

8. (9) Pace Academy (3-0)

9. (10) Burke County (2-0)

10. (5) Bainbridge (1-2)

Class 3A

1. (1) Cedar Grove (2-0)

2. (2) Carver-Columbus (2-0)

3. (3) Carver-Atlanta (2-0)

4. (4) Calvary Day (2-0)

5. (5) Sandy Creek (3-0)

6. (6) Crisp County (2-1)

7. (7) Oconee County (2-1)

8. (8) Peach County (1-1)

9. (9) Dougherty (3-0)

10. (NR) Stephens County (2-1)

Out: No. 10 Adairsville

Class 2A

1. (1) Fitzgerald (3-0)

2. (4) Pierce County (2-0)

3. (7) South Atlanta (2-0)

4. (2) Eagle’s Landing Christian (1-2)

5. (8) Columbia (3-0)

6. (NR) Cook (2-1)

7. (6) Rockmart (1-1)

8. (NR) Thomson (2-1)

9. (5) Putnam County (1-1)

10. (NR) North Cobb Christian (3-0)

Out: No. 3 Appling County, No. 9 Callaway, No. 10 Northeast

Class A Division I

1. (1) Prince Avenue Christian (2-0)

2. (3) Swainsboro (3-0)

3. (4) Rabun County (3-0)

4. (6) Bleckley County (2-0)

5. (5) Irwin County (1-1)

6. (2) Brooks County (2-1)

7. (7) Whitefield Academy (3-0)

8. (8) Lamar County (3-0)

9. (10) Darlington (3-0)

10. (NR) Elbert County (3-0)

Out: No. 9 Metter

Class A Division II

1. (2) Clinch County (3-0)

2. (10) Early County (3-0)

3. (4) Charlton County (3-0)

4. (1) Schley County (1-1)

5. (6) Bowdon (2-1)

6. (8) Johnson County (2-0)

7. (5) Wilcox County (0-2)

8. (9) Washington-Wilkes (2-0)

9. (NR) Aquinas (3-0)

10. (NR) Montgomery County (2-0)

Out: No. 3 Macon County, No. 7 Lincoln County

SEC football Week 1 predictions: Our experts pick the winner of every game

SEC football gets underway this week in full force, with all 14 teams in action after last weekend's one-game appetizer when ...

SEC football gets underway this week in full force, with all 14 teams in action after last weekend's one-game appetizer when Vanderbilt visited Hawaii.

There will be cupcakes for those who like their dessert early, but a few main courses involving ranked teams facing each other like Georgia vs. Oregon, Cincinnati visiting Arkansas and Utah at Florida.

The USA TODAY Sports Network is picking the winner of every game. Here's how they see the first full week of action playing out.

BEST AND WORST:Two-loss Alabama? Undefeated Georgia? Best- and worst-case scenarios for every SEC football team

22 FOR '22:22 questions I have about SEC football teams for the 2022 season | Toppmeyer

SEC FOOTBALL UNFILTERED PODCAST:From Alabama supremacy to Heisman to hot seat, some last rapid-fire SEC football predictions

Thursday

Ball State at Tennessee

Emily Adams, Greenville News: Tennessee

Kevin Brockway, Gainesville Sun: Tennessee

Brett Dawson, Courier-Journal: Tennessee

Bennett Durando, Montgomery Advertiser: Tennessee

Aria Gerson, Tennessean: Tennessee

Nick Kelly, Tuscaloosa News: Tennessee

Stefan Krajisnik, Clarion Ledger: Tennessee

Christina Long, Southwest Times Record: Tennessee

Koki Riley, Daily Advertiser: Tennessee

Adam Sparks, Knoxville News Sentinel: Tennessee

Matt Stahl, Columbia Daily Tribune: Tennessee

Nick Suss, Clarion Ledger: Tennessee

Marc Weiszer, Athens Banner-Herald: Tennessee

Louisiana Tech at Missouri

Emily Adams, Greenville News: Missouri

Kevin Brockway, Gainesville Sun: Missouri

Brett Dawson, Courier-Journal: Missouri

Bennett Durando, Montgomery Advertiser: Missouri

Aria Gerson, Tennessean: Missouri

Nick Kelly, Tuscaloosa News: Missouri

Stefan Krajisnik, Clarion Ledger: Missouri

Christina Long, Southwest Times Record: Missouri

Koki Riley, Daily Advertiser: Missouri

Adam Sparks, Knoxville News Sentinel: Missouri

Matt Stahl, Columbia Daily Tribune: Missouri

Nick Suss, Clarion Ledger: Missouri

Marc Weiszer, Athens Banner-Herald: Missouri

Saturday

Sam Houston at Texas A&M

Emily Adams, Greenville News: Texas A&M

Kevin Brockway, Gainesville Sun: Texas A&M

Brett Dawson, Courier-Journal: Texas A&M

Bennett Durando, Montgomery Advertiser: Texas A&M

Aria Gerson, Tennessean: Texas A&M

Nick Kelly, Tuscaloosa News: Texas A&M

Stefan Krajisnik, Clarion Ledger: Texas A&M

Christina Long, Southwest Times Record: Texas A&M

Koki Riley, Daily Advertiser: Texas A&M

Adam Sparks, Knoxville News Sentinel: Texas A&M

Matt Stahl, Columbia Daily Tribune: Texas A&M

Nick Suss, Clarion Ledger: Texas A&M

Marc Weiszer, Athens Banner-Herald: Texas A&M

Oregon vs. Georgia (Atlanta)

Emily Adams, Greenville News: Georgia

Kevin Brockway, Gainesville Sun: Georgia

Brett Dawson, Courier-Journal: Georgia

Bennett Durando, Montgomery Advertiser: Georgia

Aria Gerson, Tennessean: Georgia

Nick Kelly, Tuscaloosa News: Georgia

Stefan Krajisnik, Clarion Ledger: Georgia

Christina Long, Southwest Times Record: Georgia

Koki Riley, Daily Advertiser: Georgia

Adam Sparks, Knoxville News Sentinel: Georgia

Matt Stahl, Columbia Daily Tribune: Georgia

Nick Suss, Clarion Ledger: Georgia

Marc Weiszer, Athens Banner-Herald: Georgia

Cincinnati at Arkansas

Emily Adams, Greenville News: Cincinnati

Kevin Brockway, Gainesville Sun: Arkansas

Brett Dawson, Courier-Journal: Arkansas

Bennett Durando, Montgomery Advertiser: Arkansas

Aria Gerson, Tennessean: Arkansas

Nick Kelly, Tuscaloosa News: Arkansas

Stefan Krajisnik, Clarion Ledger: Arkansas

Christina Long, Southwest Times Record: Arkansas

Koki Riley, Daily Advertiser: Arkansas

Adam Sparks, Knoxville News Sentinel: Arkansas

Matt Stahl, Columbia Daily Tribune: Arkansas

Nick Suss, Clarion Ledger: Arkansas

Marc Weiszer, Athens Banner-Herald: Arkansas

Troy at Ole Miss

Emily Adams, Greenville News: Ole Miss

Kevin Brockway, Gainesville Sun: Ole Miss

Brett Dawson, Courier-Journal: Ole Miss

Bennett Durando, Montgomery Advertiser: Ole Miss

Aria Gerson, Tennessean: Ole Miss

Nick Kelly, Tuscaloosa News: Ole Miss

Stefan Krajisnik, Clarion Ledger: Ole Miss

Christina Long, Southwest Times Record: Ole Miss

Koki Riley, Daily Advertiser: Ole Miss

Adam Sparks, Knoxville News Sentinel: Ole Miss

Matt Stahl, Columbia Daily Tribune: Ole Miss

Nick Suss, Clarion Ledger: Ole Miss

Marc Weiszer, Athens Banner-Herald: Ole Miss

Utah at Florida

Emily Adams, Greenville News: Utah

Kevin Brockway, Gainesville Sun: Florida

Brett Dawson, Courier-Journal: Utah

Bennett Durando, Montgomery Advertiser: Utah

Aria Gerson, Tennessean: Florida

Nick Kelly, Tuscaloosa News: Utah

Stefan Krajisnik, Clarion Ledger: Utah

Christina Long, Southwest Times Record: Utah

Koki Riley, Daily Advertiser: Utah

Adam Sparks, Knoxville News Sentinel: Utah

Matt Stahl, Columbia Daily Tribune: Florida

Nick Suss, Clarion Ledger: Utah

Marc Weiszer, Athens Banner-Herald: Utah

Miami (Ohio) at Kentucky

Emily Adams, Greenville News: Kentucky

Kevin Brockway, Gainesville Sun: Kentucky

Brett Dawson, Courier-Journal: Kentucky

Bennett Durando, Montgomery Advertiser: Kentucky

Aria Gerson, Tennessean: Kentucky

Nick Kelly, Tuscaloosa News: Kentucky

Stefan Krajisnik, Clarion Ledger: Kentucky

Christina Long, Southwest Times Record: Kentucky

Koki Riley, Daily Advertiser: Kentucky

Adam Sparks, Knoxville News Sentinel: Kentucky

Matt Stahl, Columbia Daily Tribune: Kentucky

Nick Suss, Clarion Ledger: Kentucky

Marc Weiszer, Athens Banner-Herald: Kentucky

Mercer at Auburn

Emily Adams, Greenville News: Auburn

Kevin Brockway, Gainesville Sun: Auburn

Brett Dawson, Courier-Journal: Auburn

Bennett Durando, Montgomery Advertiser: Auburn

Aria Gerson, Tennessean: Auburn

Nick Kelly, Tuscaloosa News: Auburn

Stefan Krajisnik, Clarion Ledger: Auburn

Christina Long, Southwest Times Record: Auburn

Koki Riley, Daily Advertiser: Auburn

Adam Sparks, Knoxville News Sentinel: Auburn

Matt Stahl, Columbia Daily Tribune: Auburn

Nick Suss, Clarion Ledger: Auburn

Marc Weiszer, Athens Banner-Herald: Auburn

Elon at Vanderbilt

Emily Adams, Greenville News: Vanderbilt

Kevin Brockway, Gainesville Sun: Vanderbilt

Brett Dawson, Courier-Journal: Vanderbilt

Bennett Durando, Montgomery Advertiser: Vanderbilt

Aria Gerson, Tennessean: Vanderbilt

Nick Kelly, Tuscaloosa News: Vanderbilt

Stefan Krajisnik, Clarion Ledger: Vanderbilt

Christina Long, Southwest Times Record: Vanderbilt

Koki Riley, Daily Advertiser: Vanderbilt

Adam Sparks, Knoxville News Sentinel: Vanderbilt

Matt Stahl, Columbia Daily Tribune: Vanderbilt

Nick Suss, Clarion Ledger: Vanderbilt

Marc Weiszer, Athens Banner-Herald: Vanderbilt

Utah State at Alabama

Emily Adams, Greenville News: Alabama

Kevin Brockway, Gainesville Sun: Alabama

Brett Dawson, Courier-Journal: Alabama

Bennett Durando, Montgomery Advertiser: Alabama

Aria Gerson, Tennessean: Alabama

Nick Kelly, Tuscaloosa News: Alabama

Stefan Krajisnik, Clarion Ledger: Alabama

Christina Long, Southwest Times Record: Alabama

Koki Riley, Daily Advertiser: Alabama

Adam Sparks, Knoxville News Sentinel: Alabama

Matt Stahl, Columbia Daily Tribune: Alabama

Nick Suss, Clarion Ledger: Alabama

Marc Weiszer, Athens Banner-Herald: Alabama

Memphis at Mississippi State

Emily Adams, Greenville News: Mississippi State

Kevin Brockway, Gainesville Sun: Mississippi State

Brett Dawson, Courier-Journal: Mississippi State

Bennett Durando, Montgomery Advertiser: Mississippi State

Aria Gerson, Tennessean: Mississippi State

Nick Kelly, Tuscaloosa News: Mississippi State

Stefan Krajisnik, Clarion Ledger: Mississippi State

Christina Long, Southwest Times Record: Mississippi State

Koki Riley, Daily Advertiser: Mississippi State

Adam Sparks, Knoxville News Sentinel: Mississippi State

Matt Stahl, Columbia Daily Tribune: Mississippi State

Nick Suss, Clarion Ledger: Mississippi State

Marc Weiszer, Athens Banner-Herald: Mississippi State

Georgia State at South Carolina

Emily Adams, Greenville News: South Carolina

Kevin Brockway, Gainesville Sun: South Carolina

Brett Dawson, Courier-Journal: South Carolina

Bennett Durando, Montgomery Advertiser: South Carolina

Aria Gerson, Tennessean: South Carolina

Nick Kelly, Tuscaloosa News: South Carolina

Stefan Krajisnik, Clarion Ledger: South Carolina

Christina Long, Southwest Times Record: South Carolina

Koki Riley, Daily Advertiser: South Carolina

Adam Sparks, Knoxville News Sentinel: South Carolina

Matt Stahl, Columbia Daily Tribune: South Carolina

Nick Suss, Clarion Ledger: South Carolina

Marc Weiszer, Athens Banner-Herald: South Carolina

Sunday

LSU vs. Florida State (New Orleans)

Emily Adams, Greenville News: LSU

Kevin Brockway, Gainesville Sun: LSU

Brett Dawson, Courier-Journal: LSU

Bennett Durando, Montgomery Advertiser: LSU

Aria Gerson, Tennessean: LSU

Nick Kelly, Tuscaloosa News: LSU

Stefan Krajisnik, Clarion Ledger: LSU

Christina Long, Southwest Times Record: Florida State

Koki Riley, Daily Advertiser: LSU

Adam Sparks, Knoxville News Sentinel: LSU

Matt Stahl, Columbia Daily Tribune: LSU

Nick Suss, Clarion Ledger: LSU

Marc Weiszer, Athens Banner-Herald: LSU

Kirby Smart can win like Nick Saban, but now can Georgia 'rebuild' like Alabama? | Toppmeyer

Kirby Smart proved last season he knows how to win like Nick Sa...

Kirby Smart proved last season he knows how to win like Nick Saban. Now, we’ll learn whether Smart knows how to “rebuild” like his former boss.

Among the remarkable aspects of Saban’s dynasty is how Alabama fares in years in which it does not win the national championship. In addition to six national titles, Alabama has three national runner-up finishes under Saban, amid 14 consecutive seasons with at least 10 victories.

A season can be derailed in so many ways – injuries, projected stars not panning out, poor team chemistry, an inability to adjust to roster turnover or coaching staff departures. Alabama isn’t immune to such challenges but nonetheless has avoided a season being utterly wrecked by them.

Saban raised eyebrows last week when he dubbed 2021 “a rebuilding year” during an interview with Birmingham radio station WJOX, but I fail to see the controversy in his assessment. Alabama has simply repositioned what a rebuilding season can look like.

Ten players from the Tide’s 2020 national championship team were selected in the NFL Draft. Entering last season, Alabama needed to replace its starting quarterback, its starting running back, two star wide receivers, three starting offensive linemen and its best cornerback.

No one recruits and develops better than Saban, so of course we expected Alabama to continue threshing without hiccup. But Bryce Young and Will Anderson Jr. powered a ’21 team known more for its resilience than an overwhelming depth of superstars.

Alabama won the SEC Championship, but it was not the nation’s best all-around team. Georgia owned that distinction and proved it by beating Alabama in the national championship.

If Alabama was any other team and Saban was any other coach, going 13-2 would have been dubbed a notable feat on the heels of losing so much talent from a historically great 2020 team.

For Alabama, it felt like business as usual.

Alabama is no longer rebuilding. Consider the Tide rebuilt.

Proven starters like Young, Anderson, Henry To’o To’o, Jordan Battle and Emil Ekiyor Jr. should make this a more consistent team, and a few marquee transfers address some prior deficiencies.

Smart’s blueprint looks a lot like the one he learned from Saban.

Georgia is the only team that has consistently challenged Alabama’s recruiting dominance the past several years, and the 2021 Georgia defense impersonated 2011 Alabama.

Now, though, Georgia must adjust to the departure of a record 15 NFL Draft selections. That included five defensive players selected in the first round, proof of how loaded Georgia’s defense was.

College football had trended in a quarterback-driven direction before the Bulldogs won their first national championship since 1980 in throwback fashion.

Defensive lineman Jalen Carter, linebacker Nolan Smith and defensive backs Kelee Ringo and Christopher Smith form the backbone of a still-talented Georgia defense, but this is nonetheless a more unproven unit featuring lauded recruits who are ascending into starting roles.

Amid all the turnover, if the name across the front of Georgia's jerseys said Alabama, the Bulldogs would be facing championship expectations, because Alabama perennially faces those expectations.

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The Tide’s on-field dominance has been topped only by its reign of preseason polls. Alabama on Monday snagged the No. 1 ranking in the preseason USA TODAY Sports AFCA coaches poll, the seventh time in the past 13 years it earned top billing.

Georgia is ranked third, behind Ohio State.

Alabama also ranked No. 1 in the preseason last year. In reality, though, Alabama was rebuilding then, just like Georgia is now – even if Smart won’t say it.

Smart recently rejected the “rebuild” label for this Georgia team, saying he’s coaching a “hungry” team eager to prove itself.

That’s preseason coach-speak that loosely translates to: Yes, we’re rebuilding, but I’m not going to say that, and I still believe in my team.

Smart clearly welcomes the expectation that Georgia is built to withstand roster turnover, but we’ve seen the toll extreme roster turnover can have on the staying power of teams not named Alabama.

After LSU’s 2019 team won the national championship, 14 Tigers were drafted. LSU went 11-12 in the next two seasons.

If Georgia is to remain on Alabama’s level, it must “rebuild” like the Tide rebuilds.

Saban rebuilds by taking teams to the playoffs. That’s Smart’s next challenge.

Blake Toppmeyer is an SEC Columnist for the USA TODAY Network. Email him at BToppmeyer@gannett.com and follow him on Twitter @btoppmeyer. If you enjoy Blake’s coverage, consider a digital subscription that will allow you access to all of it.

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