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If you are accused of a crime, the only thing standing between your freedom and a verdict of "guilty" is an experienced criminal defense attorney in Georgetown, GA.

Those who have been arrested before know that life in the legal system is no laughing matter. Aside from the imminent ramifications of fines and jail time, any goals you have of bettering yourself and advancing your life could be compromised. Without a trusted attorney by your side, you could face a lifetime of embarrassment and poor employment prospects due to a tarnished criminal record.

The good news? Dennis O'Brien and his team of experienced lawyers in Georgetown are ready to clear your name. By retaining the help of a criminal defense attorney early in the legal process, you have a much better chance of securing your freedom and living a life as a productive member of society.

At O'Brien Law Firm PC, our practice was founded to fight for the rights of individuals accused of or charged with a crime. Our team of legal experts is well-equipped to take even the most difficult, contentious cases. From violent felonies to DUI, there is nothing we haven't seen and handled. As a former law enforcement officer, founding attorney Dennis O'Brien knows exactly how much a person can lose if convicted. That's why we work tirelessly to secure a verdict that is favorable for our clients.

Regardless of how serious or minor your case may be, know that we will fight fearlessly on your behalf. You deserve zealous representation - when you hire O'Brien Law Firm PC, you will receive nothing less.

 Drug Lawyer Georgetown, GA
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The O'Brien Law Firm PC Difference

Many of our clients are surprised to discover that founding lawyer Dennis O'Brien was a police officer prior to his criminal defense career. As a former Field Training Officer for the Memphis Police Department, he has over two decades of knowledge and experience in the criminal justice system. Dennis truly understands the nuance and complexities involved in a criminal defense case. This rare experience gives Dennis a clear edge in any criminal defense case and gives clients priceless peace of mind when they need it the most. Unlike some criminal defense attorneys in Georgetown, Dennis O'Brien and his team believe that every client deserves effective, empathetic legal assistance. While some Georgetown criminal defense firms will take weekends off or pass along cases to paralegals, Dennis personally reviews each of his cases. There is no case too small or big for O'Brien Law Firm PC. When you hire our firm, you can rest easy knowing that we will be by your side when the going gets tough.

 Federal Defense Attorney Georgetown, GA
Here are just a few reasons why O'Brien Law Firm PC is Georgetown's top choice in criminal defense:
  • Vigorous Representation
  • Fierce Dedication to Clients
  • Unmatched Experience
  • Face-to-Face Counsel
  • Prompt Response to Inquiries and Questions
  • Commitment to Defending Your Rights
  • Thorough, Effective Research and Investigation
  • Contact Us or Call: 912-704-5150
 Criminal Defense Law Firms Georgetown, GA
Our firm has represented hundreds of criminal defense clients in Georgetown and is highly qualified to take your case. Some of our specialties include:

Drug Cases in Georgetown, GA

When you are charged with a drug crime in Georgetown, it can change your life forever. Georgia imposes very strict punishments for drug offenses. The truth is, it's hard to get your life back on track with a drug charge on your record. Your freedom and way of life could be in the hands of your criminal defense attorney. As such, you need a competent lawyer with years of experience handling drug cases. Leaving your fate in the hands of an incompetent attorney could have long-lasting effects on your family and may result in a conviction.

 Criminal Defense Lawyers Georgetown, GA

Consequences for drug crimes in Georgetown often include:

  • Jail
  • Prison
  • Heavy fines
  • Community service
  • Court-ordered drug and alcohol counseling
  • Probation or parole
  • Permanent criminal record

While the consequences for a drug crime in Georgia are serious, there's reason to be hopeful: O'Brien Law Firm PC is here to fight for you. Remember - being charged with a drug crime is NOT the same thing as being convicted.

Our stellar team has represented many clients facing numerous drug-related charges. While each situation varies, one constant remains the same for clients facing drug charges: a fear of what lies ahead. At O'Brien Law Firm PC our job is to help you overcome the fear of the unknown. We do so by ensuring you understand your charges, the possible outcomes associated with those charges, and the options you need to consider from a criminal defense standpoint.

With more than a decade of experience as Georgetown drug crime attorneys, we have the experience and resources to defend you in court no matter what your charges may be, including:

  • Marijuana
  • Crack
  • Cocaine
  • Heroin
  • Methamphetamine
  • Ecstasy

No matter what charge you are facing, our team has the experience and resources to build a comprehensive defense strategy for your drug case in Georgetown, GA. Without a criminal defense attorney acting as your advocate, you could be facing very harsh penalties. Here are a few punishments you could be facing for drug crimes in Georgetown:

  • Schedule I or Schedule II Drug Possession
    Schedule I or Schedule II Drug Possession:

    Having less than a gram (or one milliliter for liquids) of this type of drug results in a prison term of one to three years. Having four grams or milliliter carries a term of one to eight years.

  • Schedule III, IV, or V Drug Possession
    Schedule III, IV, or V Drug Possession:

    Any substance on this list is punishable by a prison sentence of one to three years.

  • Non-Narcotic Schedule II Drug Possession
    Non-Narcotic Schedule II Drug Possession:

    If you have less than two grams or milliliters of this substance, punishments can be between one year and three years. Having up to four grams or milliliters results in a prison sentence of one to eight years.

  • Possession of Marijuana
    Possession of Marijuana:

    Those who are in possession of less than an ounce of marijuana are subject to a jail sentence of up to 12 months. Fines may be no more than $1,000. Possession of more than an ounce of marijuana can result in a prison term of one to 10 years.

To avoid these life-changing punishments, you must take action now. Contact O'Brien Law Firm today for a consultation about your case.

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 Defense Lawyers Georgetown, GA
 Criminal Defense Attorney Georgetown, GA

Violent Crime Cases in Georgetown, GA

Violent crime offenses in Georgetown typically involve some form of bodily harm to another individual, actions committed against an individual's will, or threatening someone with bodily harm. Aggravated violent offenses are more severe charges and often occur when a violent crime is made more serious due to circumstances like deadly weapons.

Much like serious drug cases, violent crimes create an added layer of negativity that follows the accused for the rest of their life. In these cases, even an accusation is enough to cause irreparable damage to a person's reputation. Those convicted of a violent crime face severe penalties that can include years in a correctional facility.

Common crimes of this nature include but are not limited to:
  • Murder
  • Assault with the intent to murder
  • Vehicular homicide
  • Domestic violence
  • Assault
  • Battery
  • Kidnapping
  • Rape
  • Robbery
  • Carjacking

When you are accused of any of the above crimes, your freedom hangs in the balance. The outcome of your case will determine whether you leave the courtroom with your freedom intact or stripped away to serve time behind bars. Because the punishments for violent crimes are so extreme, you should be seeking legal counsel from a criminal defense attorney in Georgetown, GA, as soon as possible. As a former police officer with a long record of positive verdicts in violent crime cases, Dennis O'Brien is well equipped to represent you in court.

Having a criminal defense lawyer by your side is the best way to avoid the serious punishments associated with violent crimes. These punishments usually result in prison time if convicted and include:
Forced rape: 20 years
Armed robbery: Up to 20 years
Simple assault: Up to 12 months
Aggravated assault: 10 to 20 years
Aggravated battery: Up to 20 years
Involuntary manslaughter: One to 20 years
Vehicular homicide Up to 15 years
Murder: Life in prison or the death sentence
Zealous Representation Without Judgement

As a former police officer, Dennis O'Brien has seen the toll it takes on a person when charged with a crime. His time in law enforcement allows him to empathize with his clients who desperately need competent representation. Despite being innocent until proven guilty, accusations are scary, and conviction could be a reality. That is why you must work with a trustworthy criminal defense lawyer in Georgetown, GA who will work tirelessly to clear your name.

Clients choose O'Brien Law Firm because we believe in open communication, honesty, and hard work. It is not our job to act as judges for those who have been accused of crimes. Rather, our goal is to find the best defense that allows us to protect our clients' rights and freedoms.

DUI Cases in Georgetown, GA

Driving under the influence (DUI) is one of the most common crimes committed in Georgia. Punishments for such a crime can be severe, and for understandable reasons - when a person operates a vehicle while they are intoxicated, they're putting their life and the lives of others at risk.

While DUI is a serious crime that completely upend the accused's life, the earnest desire to end drunk driving can make police officers too eager to catch a person who they believe is under the influence.

 Criminal Defense Law Firm Georgetown, GA

The city of Georgetown, Georgia, has implemented severe punishments for DUI, even for first-time offenders. Individuals charged with DUI in Georgetown could face:

  • Very expensive fines and fees
  • Loss of license
  • Incarceration

Fortunately, if you or someone you love has been charged with DUI, there is hope. This is particularly true when the accused is administered a breath or blood test for DUI. In fact, cases that involve a breath and/or blood test are beaten daily. When you hire O'Brien Law Firm PC, we will dive deep into your DUI case in Georgetown and examine every angle possible for your case to be dismissed. Here are just a few questions our team will investigate:

  • Was the stop legal? If not, your case could be dismissed
  • Is there enough evidence or probable cause to arrest you? If not, Dennis O'Brien will file a pre-trial motion and will fight hard to have your case dismissed before trial.
  • Did the police read you your implied consent rights? If not, your case could be thrown out. Failure to read implied consent rights to the accused is one of the most common police errors.
  • Were your blood testing records and breathalyzer results maintained? Breath testing comes with inherent weaknesses that can create doubt in a juror's mind.

There are numerous ways to beat a DUI case in Georgia, from unreliable field sobriety tests to inaccurate state-administered breath tests. As a veteran criminal defense lawyer in Georgetown, GA, Dennis O'Brien has the knowledge and experience to expose the state's mistakes and fight for your rights. When you hire O'Brien Law Firm PC your chances of dismissal are greatly increased. When your case is dismissed, you can continue living life without the burden of a criminal record.

 Criminal Justice Attorney Georgetown, GA

If you or someone you love is accused of a crime in Georgetown, GA, don't leave fate up to the prosecution. Take the necessary steps to protect yourself and your family before it's too late.

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Latest News in Georgetown, GA

Wolverine GA a trailblazer for female coaches

ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- Mimi Bolden-Morris had a trailblazing season at Michigan, becoming what is believed to be the first female graduate assistant football coach at a power conference school since the late 1980s.If her mother didn't call coach Jim Harbaugh, it wouldn't have happened.Bolden-Morris will be on the sideline Saturday when the second-ranked Wolverines play No. 3 TCU at the Fiesta Bowl in a College Football semfinal, helping to substitute tight ends into the game whose winner will play for the national championship....

ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- Mimi Bolden-Morris had a trailblazing season at Michigan, becoming what is believed to be the first female graduate assistant football coach at a power conference school since the late 1980s.

If her mother didn't call coach Jim Harbaugh, it wouldn't have happened.

Bolden-Morris will be on the sideline Saturday when the second-ranked Wolverines play No. 3 TCU at the Fiesta Bowl in a College Football semfinal, helping to substitute tight ends into the game whose winner will play for the national championship.

The 23-year-old Bolden-Morris, who played basketball at Boston College and Georgetown, reached out to college football programs across the country to inquire about potential opportunities. It didn't cross her mind to attempt to join Michigan's staff because her brother, Mike, is a senior standout defensive end on the team.

"My mom said, `Why don't you just reach out to coach Harbaugh,'" Bolden-Morris recalled in a recent interview at Schembechler Hall. "I was like, `No, I don't want to bother my brother.' She called anyway."

Melanie Bolden-Morris, the principal of Glades Central High School in Belle Glade, Florida, contacted Harbaugh last spring to ask if her son could be excused to attend his sister's graduation ceremony at Georgetown. After getting the OK, she asked if there was an internship available with the Wolverines, perhaps for the summer, for her daugther.

"I caught him off guard, but he was very positive about it and said he would look into it," she said. "He called me back the next day and said she would have to interview. You have to ask for what you want in life. The worst thing he could say is no."

She got a yes. And in doing so, Bolden-Morris ended a long drought for female coaches at the highest level of college football since Carol White worked with Georgia Tech kickers in the late 1980s.

In the NFL, Tampa Bay Buccaneers assistant defensive line coach Lori Locust became the league's first female position coach in 2019 and Jennifer King is in her first season as Washington's assistant running backs coach and her second on the staff.

"Hopefully, women in sport is something that becomes absolutely normal," Bolden-Morris said. "And hopefully, I'm able to pave the way for that."

Bolden-Morris is from Belle Glade, an area west of West Palm Beach referred to as "Muck City" and known for producing dozens of professional football players and growing sugarcane.

She grew up around the game, standing on sidelines with her father, Mike Morris Sr., and throwing footballs around.

Bolden-Morris played a lot of sports, but she was best at basketball. She was named to the all-ACC freshman team in 2018 while playing for Boston College and started every game last season at Georgetown, averaging nearly 13 points to lead the team as a graduate transfer.

While pursuing a career in basketball may have provided an easier path, coaching football became her goal after leading a youth flag football team entering her final year with the Hoyas. To prepare her for the potential transition, she sat in on meetings with Georgetown football coaches.

In March, Harbaugh announced Bolden-Morris was joining his staff.

"I have always believed in providing opportunities for individuals who are passionate about football and Mimi is someone who has shown that drive to become a football coach," he said.

Bolden-Morris acknowledged she has, and continues to have, a lot to learn about football. She had to figure out a long list of plays, concepts and formations on the fly.

She helps the offensive staff with scouting reports, researching the history of opposing defensive coaches and analyzing what plays and personnel could work well for the Wolverines.

"For example, the defensive coordinator at TCU (Joe Gillespie) used to coach at Tulsa so we look back to see what we can pick up from their philosophies," she said. "I'll also watch all of TCU's plays to see perhaps what Texas did to make some explosive plays."

During games, Bolden-Morris assists tight ends coach Grant Newsome with the position group substitutions and basically blends in with the staff.

Bolden-Morris, who plans to return for a second season as a graduate assistant, hopes her work will help other women with the same dream.

"Knowing that I'm inspiring other people, being able to plant trees that I won't see grow, knowing that a girl, boy, whoever is looking up to me and is inspired by what I'm able to do and see me every Saturday on TV and saying, `OK, I can do whatever I want to do because Mimi's doing it,'" she said. "That has been the greatest experience ever."

DePaul vs. Georgetown Game Preview

We preview the Big East conference battle between the Blue Demons and the Georgetown Hoyas on Thursday night at Wintrust Arena in Chicago, Illinois in this report.Key InformationDePaul Blue Demons (6-7, 0-2) vs. Georgetown Hoyas (5-8, 0-2) Thursday, December 29th, 7:00 p.m. Central – Wintrust Arena, Chicago, IllinoisHow to Watch on Television – FOX Sports 2Game Preview Georgetown has lost 27 straight games to high major opponents and has lost 23 straig...

We preview the Big East conference battle between the Blue Demons and the Georgetown Hoyas on Thursday night at Wintrust Arena in Chicago, Illinois in this report.

Key Information

DePaul Blue Demons (6-7, 0-2) vs. Georgetown Hoyas (5-8, 0-2) Thursday, December 29th, 7:00 p.m. Central – Wintrust Arena, Chicago, Illinois

How to Watch on Television – FOX Sports 2

Game Preview

Georgetown has lost 27 straight games to high major opponents and has lost 23 straight Big East games.

The last high major opponent to lose to Georgetown? Syracuse

Needless to say, Georgetown head coach Patrick Ewing is on the hot seat this season. After going 0-21 in Big East games last season, Georgetown surprisingly decided to bring Ewing back for another year. Ewing did have to start over with three new assistant coaches. A move that was reminiscent of DePaul’s 0-18 team under Jerry Wainwright.

Georgetown comes into Thursday’s game looking to end those losing streaks. The Hoyas may come in a bit rusty as they were on a nine-day break between games over the Christmas holiday.

Meanwhile DePaul is looking to end a three-game losing streak. The Blue Demons are getting healthier as they regained both guard Jalen Terry (bruised knee) and center Yor Anei (foot injury) on Sunday giving them 10 healthy scholarship players for the first time since mid-November.

After the 0-21 Big East season last year, Ewing looked to the NCAA Transfer Portal to rebuild the roster. All five Georgetown starters are new to the team via the portal this year.

Duquesne transfer Primo Spears leads the Hoyas in scoring at 17.7 points and 4.5 assists per game. Spears is no stranger to losing as he went 6-24 at Duquesne last season.

Brandon Murray arrived via the portal from LSU and is contributing 14.6 ppg.

Arizona State guard Jay Heath joins Spears and Murray in the backcourt and chips in with 13.9 ppg.

Ewing reclaimed one of his own when former Georgetown center Qudus Wahab transferred back from Maryland after one season with the Terps. Wahab averages 11.2 points and 7.8 rebounds per game.

6-10 forward Akok Akok joined the Hoyas after spending two years at UConn. Akok adds seven points and 7.2 rebounds per game.

One aspect of the game where DePaul has an advantage is with 3-point shooting. The Blue Demons average 8.9 trifectas per game, while Georgetown makes 5.9 threes per game on average.

Look for this one to be a high scoring affair. Georgetown is giving up an average of 77.1 points per game, while DePaul’s opponents are scoring 75.5 ppg.

In Ken Pomeroy’s college basketball ratings the Hoyas are 168th, while the Demons are no. 122. DePaul is 177th, while Georgetown is number 230.

Gambling Info.

DePaul is favored by 3.5 points.

The Blue Demons are 5-8 against the spread thus far this season.

The Over/Under is 153.5 points.

The Last Time

On February 24, 2022, at Capital One Arena in Washington, D.C., the Blue Demons defeated the Hoyas 68-65.

Javon Freeman-Liberty led all scorers with 25 points, seven rebounds, three assists and two steals. Nick Ongenda and Yor Anei added 11 points apiece.

Aminu Mohammed led the way for the Hoyas with 18 points and nine rebounds.

Georgetown Roster

# FULL NAME HT. WT. POS. ACADEMIC YEAR HOMETOWN / HIGH SCHOOL PREVIOUS SCHOOL

0 Brandon Murray 6-5 225 G So. Germantown, Md. / IMG Academy [Fla.] LSU

1 Primo Spears 6-3 185 G So. Hartford, Conn. / Mt. Zion Prep [Md.] Duquesne

4 Denver Anglin 6-1 185 G Fr. Montclair, N.J. / Gill St. Bernard's

5 Jay Heath 6-3 200 G Jr. Washington, D.C. / Woodrow Wilson Arizona State

11 Akok Akok 6-10 205 F Jr. Manchester, N.H. / Putnam Science Academy [Conn.] UConn

12 Jordan Riley 6-4 200 G So. Brentwood, N.Y. / Brentwood

15 Bryson Mozone 6-6 210 F Gr. North Augusta, S.C. / North Augusta USC Upstate

21 Ryan Mutombo 7-2 265 C So. Atlanta, Ga. / The Lovett School

22 Bradley Ezewiro 6-9 255 F/C So. Torrance, Calif. / Oak Hill Academy [Va.] LSU

23 D'Ante Bass 6-6 200 F Fr. Savannah, Ga. / Windsor Forest

31 Wayne Bristol Jr. 6-6 195 G Jr. Upper Marlboro, Md. / St. Thomas More School [Conn.] Howard

32 Malcolm Wilson 7-0 220 C Sr. Columbia, S.C. / Ridge View

34 Qudus Wahab 6-11 245 C Sr. Lagos, Nigeria / Flint Hill [Va.] Maryland

55 Victor Muresan 6-11 185 F Jr. Potomac, Md. / Georgetown Day School

How Georgia’s new Medicaid work requirement program will work

by Rebecca Grapevine | Capitol Beat News ServiceATLANTA – After years of legal wrangling, the countdown to the July 1, 2023, launch date of Georgia’s Medicaid work requirements program is underway.The new plan – officially called Pathways to Coverage – will require enrollees to complete 80 hours of work, education, job training, or community service per month to get Medicaid health insurance. Many will also have to pay a monthly premium.Once the program begins, Ge...

by Rebecca Grapevine | Capitol Beat News Service

ATLANTA – After years of legal wrangling, the countdown to the July 1, 2023, launch date of Georgia’s Medicaid work requirements program is underway.

The new plan – officially called Pathways to Coverage – will require enrollees to complete 80 hours of work, education, job training, or community service per month to get Medicaid health insurance. Many will also have to pay a monthly premium.

Once the program begins, Georgia will be the sole state with work requirements for Medicaid. Adults between ages 18 and 64 who earn less than 100% of the federal poverty level – and who are not otherwise eligible for Medicaid – are the targeted group. For 2022, the federal poverty level was $13,590 for a single person and $27,750 for a family of four.

Though exact numbers are difficult to calculate, it’s expected that the Pathways program will provide insurance to only a small percentage of the 1.3 million Georgians without health insurance.

State officials estimate around 345,000 Georgians would be eligible for the new program. Back in 2020, they said they expected only about 64,000 people to actually enroll in the program.

Now that the program is becoming a reality, the Georgia Department of Community Health (DCH), the state Medicaid agency, has requested funds to cover up to 100,000 people in the upcoming budget, said spokesman David Graves. That’s 29% of those who will be eligible.

“Georgia leadership has put in place barriers that they know, that they have calculated, will prevent … people from enrolling,” said Leonardo Cuello, research professor at Georgetown University’s Center for Children and Families, about the discrepancy between the number of eligible people and the number expected to enroll.

Critics of Pathways contend the program will cover far fewer Georgians and cost more than a full expansion of Medicaid, as 39 states have done.

Leah Chan, senior health analyst at the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute, a left-leaning think tank in Atlanta, said the new program will cost around $2,420 per enrollee while it would cost only $496 per enrollee if the state fully expanded Medicaid.

“New financial incentives under the American Rescue Plan sweeten the deal [for full Medicaid expansion] and more than offset the state cost of expansion for at least the first two years,” Chan said.

Enrollees in Georgia Pathways will need to certify their employment each month. Those who earn more than 50% of the federal poverty level will also be required to pay a monthly premium ranging from $7 to $11, with an additional surcharge for people who use tobacco products.

The program will provide a two-month grace period for people who do not pay their premiums. But after three months of non-payment, they will lose the insurance. They can be reinstated if they make at least one monthly payment within 90 days.

The state plans to use the existing benefits portal, Georgia Gateway, for program applicants to manage their work-requirement reporting, said Graves, the DCH spokesperson. He said Georgians can expect to learn more about the details of the program over the coming months.

Critics say the machinery necessary to track enrollee work records and payments will dramatically increase bureaucratic burdens both for Medicaid recipients and the state.

“When you think about working families in Georgia, they are busy with their jobs, getting kids to school and the doctor, paying the stack of bills that come in every month, and the last thing they need is additional red tape … every month just to keep their health insurance from getting terminated,” Cuello said.

Cuello said the state will have to develop “expensive administrative processes” to ensure compliance with the work requirements. The [congressional Government Accountability Office] and states have estimated costs ranging from $70 million to $270 million a year to implement and run this type of program, he said.

DCH has not yet decided whether it will need to hire additional staff to help run the program, Graves said.

The Pathways program allows some exceptions to the work-requirement rules. Enrollees will be allowed 120 hours of “non-compliance,” that is of not meeting the work requirements, in every 12-month period.

But routine child care is not on the list of exceptions. Other states that previously attempted work requirements ensured that caring for young children was a valid reason for not meeting the requirements and would not result in losing insurance.

“A stay-at-home parent taking care of two young kids in a family that lives at half of the poverty level … can’t afford child care, and they can’t just leave two young kids at home alone,” Cuello said. “Georgia’s plan makes no exceptions for these parents, and they will be denied health insurance.”

The plan has federal approval to operate until Sept. 30, 2025.

[This story is available through a news partnership with Capitol Beat News Service, a project of the Georgia Press Educational Foundation.]

Sports Scoreboard – Saturday, December 31, 2022

BOYS HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL Pierre 45, Sturgis 26 Winner 65, Sully Buttes 38 Castlewood 53, Madison 48 Colman-Egan 64, Oldham-Ramona/Rutland 45 Dell Rapids 64, Hamlin 52 Dell Rapids St. Mary 68, Waverly-South Shore 35 Deubrook Area 54, Chester Area 39 Deuel 68, Elkton-Lake Benton 51 Estelline/Hendricks 72, Garretson 34 Flandreau 66, Arlington 43 Hill City 73, New Underwood 44 Iroquois-Lake Preston 54, Baltic 47 Red Cloud 62, Todd County 47 Sioux Valley 67, De Smet 58GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL Pierre...

BOYS HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL Pierre 45, Sturgis 26 Winner 65, Sully Buttes 38 Castlewood 53, Madison 48 Colman-Egan 64, Oldham-Ramona/Rutland 45 Dell Rapids 64, Hamlin 52 Dell Rapids St. Mary 68, Waverly-South Shore 35 Deubrook Area 54, Chester Area 39 Deuel 68, Elkton-Lake Benton 51 Estelline/Hendricks 72, Garretson 34 Flandreau 66, Arlington 43 Hill City 73, New Underwood 44 Iroquois-Lake Preston 54, Baltic 47 Red Cloud 62, Todd County 47 Sioux Valley 67, De Smet 58

GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL Pierre 63, Sturgis 45 Red Cloud 71, Todd County 20

BOYS HIGH SCHOOL HOCKEY Watertown 4, Sioux Center 3 Sioux Falls 1 12, Yankton 0

GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL HOCKEY Brookings 5, Oahe 1 Sioux Falls 3, Aberdeen 1 Rushmore 7, Watertown 2

SD MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL South Dakota State 71, St. Thomas 64 South Dakota 80, Western Illinois 63 Wayne State 71, Augustana 63 Northern State 75, Minnesota Duluth 73 Southwest Minnesota State 64, Sioux Falls 54 Black Hills State @ Fort Lewis College, postponed (winter storm) SD Mines 91, Adams State 81

SD WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL South Dakota State 61, St. Thomas 51 Western Illinois 76, South Dakota 67 Augustana 80, Wayne State 77 Minnesota Duluth 70, Northern State 63 Southwest Minnesota State 70, Sioux Falls 44 Black Hills State @ Fort Lewis College, postponed (winter storm) Adams State 78, SD Mines 64 Dakota Wesleyan 72, Masters University 41

NBA Detroit 116, Minnesota 104 Indiana 131, Los Angeles Clippers 130 Brooklyn 123, Charlotte 106 Cleveland 103, Chicago 102 New York 108, Houston 88 Dallas 126, San Antonio 125 Memphis 116, New Orleans 101 Philadelphia 115, Oklahoma City 96 Miami 126, Utah 123

NHL Minnesota 5, St. Louis 2 Buffalo 4, Boston 3 (OT) Columbus 4, Chicago 1 Vegas 5, Nashville 4 (OT) Philadelphia 4, Los Angeles 2 Washington 9, Montreal 2 Toronto 6, Colorado 2 Detroit 4, Ottawa 2 Tampa Bay 5, Arizona 3 Dallas 5, San Jose 2 Calgary 3, Vancouver 2 Winnipeg 2, Edmonton 1

COLLEGE FOOTBALL BOWL GAMESFiesta Bowl – CFP Semifinal TCU 51, Michigan 45

Peach Bowl – CFP Semifinal Georgia 42, Ohio State 41 – Georgia will play TCU for CFP National Championship January 9

Sugar Bowl Alabama 45, Kansas State 20

Music City Bowl Iowa 21, Kentucky 0

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL (22)Xavier 82, (2)Connecticut 73 (3)Houston 71, UCF 65 (4)Kansas 69, Oklahoma State 67 (5)Arizona 69, Arizona State 60 (6)Texas 70, Oklahoma 69 (10)Gonzaga 111, Pepperdine 88 Iowa State 77, (12)Baylor 62 (13)Virginia 74, Georgia Tech 56 (17)Duke 86, Florida State 67 (18)TCU 67, Texas Tech 61 (19)Kentucky 86, Louisville 63 (22)New Mexico 76, Wyoming 75 Kansas State 82, (24)West Virginia 76 (OT)

WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL (2)Stanford 101, Arizona State 69 (3)Ohio State 66, (14)Michigan 57 (8)Connecticut 61, Marquette 48 (15)Iowa State 81, Texas Tech 58 (18)Arizona 63, California 58 (19)Gonzaga 96, Loyola Marymount 51 (20)Oklahoma 98, West Virginia 77 (21)Creighton 92, DePaul 82 (22)Kansas 80, Oklahoma State 65 (23)Baylor 64, TCU 42 (25)St. John’s 68, Georgetown 48

Georgetown residents opposed to potential housing development

SAVANNAH, Ga. (WTOC) - A proposed development for hundreds of homes in Georgetown is getting push back from residents.Georgetown residents are saying “no” to rezoning plans for close to 400 homes.“We just don’t want that many houses across the street,” said Susana Lane, who lives in the area.The proposed development is off Wild Heron Road not far from Georgetown Elementary School.While many residents weren’t shocked about the proposal...“We just assumed it would be ...

SAVANNAH, Ga. (WTOC) - A proposed development for hundreds of homes in Georgetown is getting push back from residents.

Georgetown residents are saying “no” to rezoning plans for close to 400 homes.

“We just don’t want that many houses across the street,” said Susana Lane, who lives in the area.

The proposed development is off Wild Heron Road not far from Georgetown Elementary School.

While many residents weren’t shocked about the proposal...

“We just assumed it would be something identical to the homes surrounding us,” said Patrick Sullivan.

They didn’t expect a development of this size.

“Having a family, you want safety for your kids,” said Shannon Hill.

Public safety is a main concern especially for parents of younger kids.

“Thinking about her playing in the street when we live 100 yards from the intersection, which will be funneling so many of these cars...an extra 800 in our backyard,” said Mary Villegas, who helped start the petition.

Residents want developers to think about scaling down how many homes they’re trying to build.

“We’re kinda piling a lot of homes all on top of each other right across the street from our neighborhood,” said Lane.

A sign sits right off the road saying “stop 400 homes”. More than 500 people have also signed a petition in the past two weeks and someone made a website to make neighbors aware.

Lane said: “We just all want to protect our property values. We have no problem with other people moving into this wonderful neighborhood. We just want to keep it you know the same integrity we’ve always had.”

They said all these homes will make traffic even worse.

“The trouble we have now can just be magnified by another 800 cars,” said Kelvin Brown.

Residents want developers to listen and know they deserve a say about what happens in their community.

“Stop and think about integrating into the neighborhood cohesively.”

Alderman Kurtis Purtee said he’s also opposed 400 homes going there because of the infrastructure and roadway.

He also said their needs to be more community engagement meetings before this goes through.

The public can attend a hearing from The Metropolitan Planning Commission next week, on July 26th.

Then, it will go before Savannah’s city council for a vote.

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