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If you are accused of a crime, the only thing standing between your freedom and a verdict of "guilty" is an experienced criminal defense attorney in Bloomingdale, GA.

Those who have been arrested before know that life in the legal system is no laughing matter. Aside from the imminent ramifications of fines and jail time, any goals you have of bettering yourself and advancing your life could be compromised. Without a trusted attorney by your side, you could face a lifetime of embarrassment and poor employment prospects due to a tarnished criminal record.

The good news? Dennis O'Brien and his team of experienced lawyers in Bloomingdale are ready to clear your name. By retaining the help of a criminal defense attorney early in the legal process, you have a much better chance of securing your freedom and living a life as a productive member of society.

At O'Brien Law Firm PC, our practice was founded to fight for the rights of individuals accused of or charged with a crime. Our team of legal experts is well-equipped to take even the most difficult, contentious cases. From violent felonies to DUI, there is nothing we haven't seen and handled. As a former law enforcement officer, founding attorney Dennis O'Brien knows exactly how much a person can lose if convicted. That's why we work tirelessly to secure a verdict that is favorable for our clients.

Regardless of how serious or minor your case may be, know that we will fight fearlessly on your behalf. You deserve zealous representation - when you hire O'Brien Law Firm PC, you will receive nothing less.

 Drug Lawyer Bloomingdale, GA
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The O'Brien Law Firm PC Difference

Many of our clients are surprised to discover that founding lawyer Dennis O'Brien was a police officer prior to his criminal defense career. As a former Field Training Officer for the Memphis Police Department, he has over two decades of knowledge and experience in the criminal justice system. Dennis truly understands the nuance and complexities involved in a criminal defense case. This rare experience gives Dennis a clear edge in any criminal defense case and gives clients priceless peace of mind when they need it the most. Unlike some criminal defense attorneys in Bloomingdale, Dennis O'Brien and his team believe that every client deserves effective, empathetic legal assistance. While some Bloomingdale criminal defense firms will take weekends off or pass along cases to paralegals, Dennis personally reviews each of his cases. There is no case too small or big for O'Brien Law Firm PC. When you hire our firm, you can rest easy knowing that we will be by your side when the going gets tough.

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Here are just a few reasons why O'Brien Law Firm PC is Bloomingdale's top choice in criminal defense:
  • Vigorous Representation
  • Fierce Dedication to Clients
  • Unmatched Experience
  • Face-to-Face Counsel
  • Prompt Response to Inquiries and Questions
  • Commitment to Defending Your Rights
  • Thorough, Effective Research and Investigation
  • Contact Us or Call: 912-704-5150
 Criminal Defense Law Firms Bloomingdale, GA
Our firm has represented hundreds of criminal defense clients in Bloomingdale and is highly qualified to take your case. Some of our specialties include:

Drug Cases in Bloomingdale, GA

When you are charged with a drug crime in Bloomingdale, it can change your life forever. Georgia imposes very strict punishments for drug offenses. The truth is, it's hard to get your life back on track with a drug charge on your record. Your freedom and way of life could be in the hands of your criminal defense attorney. As such, you need a competent lawyer with years of experience handling drug cases. Leaving your fate in the hands of an incompetent attorney could have long-lasting effects on your family and may result in a conviction.

 Criminal Defense Lawyers Bloomingdale, GA

Consequences for drug crimes in Bloomingdale often include:

  • Jail
  • Prison
  • Heavy fines
  • Community service
  • Court-ordered drug and alcohol counseling
  • Probation or parole
  • Permanent criminal record

While the consequences for a drug crime in Georgia are serious, there's reason to be hopeful: O'Brien Law Firm PC is here to fight for you. Remember - being charged with a drug crime is NOT the same thing as being convicted.

Our stellar team has represented many clients facing numerous drug-related charges. While each situation varies, one constant remains the same for clients facing drug charges: a fear of what lies ahead. At O'Brien Law Firm PC our job is to help you overcome the fear of the unknown. We do so by ensuring you understand your charges, the possible outcomes associated with those charges, and the options you need to consider from a criminal defense standpoint.

With more than a decade of experience as Bloomingdale drug crime attorneys, we have the experience and resources to defend you in court no matter what your charges may be, including:

  • Marijuana
  • Crack
  • Cocaine
  • Heroin
  • Methamphetamine
  • Ecstasy

No matter what charge you are facing, our team has the experience and resources to build a comprehensive defense strategy for your drug case in Bloomingdale, GA. Without a criminal defense attorney acting as your advocate, you could be facing very harsh penalties. Here are a few punishments you could be facing for drug crimes in Bloomingdale:

  • Schedule I or Schedule II Drug Possession
    Schedule I or Schedule II Drug Possession:

    Having less than a gram (or one milliliter for liquids) of this type of drug results in a prison term of one to three years. Having four grams or milliliter carries a term of one to eight years.

  • Schedule III, IV, or V Drug Possession
    Schedule III, IV, or V Drug Possession:

    Any substance on this list is punishable by a prison sentence of one to three years.

  • Non-Narcotic Schedule II Drug Possession
    Non-Narcotic Schedule II Drug Possession:

    If you have less than two grams or milliliters of this substance, punishments can be between one year and three years. Having up to four grams or milliliters results in a prison sentence of one to eight years.

  • Possession of Marijuana
    Possession of Marijuana:

    Those who are in possession of less than an ounce of marijuana are subject to a jail sentence of up to 12 months. Fines may be no more than $1,000. Possession of more than an ounce of marijuana can result in a prison term of one to 10 years.

To avoid these life-changing punishments, you must take action now. Contact O'Brien Law Firm today for a consultation about your case.

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 Defense Lawyers Bloomingdale, GA
 Criminal Defense Attorney Bloomingdale, GA

Violent Crime Cases in Bloomingdale, GA

Violent crime offenses in Bloomingdale typically involve some form of bodily harm to another individual, actions committed against an individual's will, or threatening someone with bodily harm. Aggravated violent offenses are more severe charges and often occur when a violent crime is made more serious due to circumstances like deadly weapons.

Much like serious drug cases, violent crimes create an added layer of negativity that follows the accused for the rest of their life. In these cases, even an accusation is enough to cause irreparable damage to a person's reputation. Those convicted of a violent crime face severe penalties that can include years in a correctional facility.

Common crimes of this nature include but are not limited to:
  • Murder
  • Assault with the intent to murder
  • Vehicular homicide
  • Domestic violence
  • Assault
  • Battery
  • Kidnapping
  • Rape
  • Robbery
  • Carjacking

When you are accused of any of the above crimes, your freedom hangs in the balance. The outcome of your case will determine whether you leave the courtroom with your freedom intact or stripped away to serve time behind bars. Because the punishments for violent crimes are so extreme, you should be seeking legal counsel from a criminal defense attorney in Bloomingdale, GA, as soon as possible. As a former police officer with a long record of positive verdicts in violent crime cases, Dennis O'Brien is well equipped to represent you in court.

Having a criminal defense lawyer by your side is the best way to avoid the serious punishments associated with violent crimes. These punishments usually result in prison time if convicted and include:
Forced rape: 20 years
Armed robbery: Up to 20 years
Simple assault: Up to 12 months
Aggravated assault: 10 to 20 years
Aggravated battery: Up to 20 years
Involuntary manslaughter: One to 20 years
Vehicular homicide Up to 15 years
Murder: Life in prison or the death sentence
Zealous Representation Without Judgement

As a former police officer, Dennis O'Brien has seen the toll it takes on a person when charged with a crime. His time in law enforcement allows him to empathize with his clients who desperately need competent representation. Despite being innocent until proven guilty, accusations are scary, and conviction could be a reality. That is why you must work with a trustworthy criminal defense lawyer in Bloomingdale, GA who will work tirelessly to clear your name.

Clients choose O'Brien Law Firm because we believe in open communication, honesty, and hard work. It is not our job to act as judges for those who have been accused of crimes. Rather, our goal is to find the best defense that allows us to protect our clients' rights and freedoms.

DUI Cases in Bloomingdale, GA

Driving under the influence (DUI) is one of the most common crimes committed in Georgia. Punishments for such a crime can be severe, and for understandable reasons - when a person operates a vehicle while they are intoxicated, they're putting their life and the lives of others at risk.

While DUI is a serious crime that completely upend the accused's life, the earnest desire to end drunk driving can make police officers too eager to catch a person who they believe is under the influence.

 Criminal Defense Law Firm Bloomingdale, GA

The city of Bloomingdale, Georgia, has implemented severe punishments for DUI, even for first-time offenders. Individuals charged with DUI in Bloomingdale could face:

  • Very expensive fines and fees
  • Loss of license
  • Incarceration

Fortunately, if you or someone you love has been charged with DUI, there is hope. This is particularly true when the accused is administered a breath or blood test for DUI. In fact, cases that involve a breath and/or blood test are beaten daily. When you hire O'Brien Law Firm PC, we will dive deep into your DUI case in Bloomingdale and examine every angle possible for your case to be dismissed. Here are just a few questions our team will investigate:

  • Was the stop legal? If not, your case could be dismissed
  • Is there enough evidence or probable cause to arrest you? If not, Dennis O'Brien will file a pre-trial motion and will fight hard to have your case dismissed before trial.
  • Did the police read you your implied consent rights? If not, your case could be thrown out. Failure to read implied consent rights to the accused is one of the most common police errors.
  • Were your blood testing records and breathalyzer results maintained? Breath testing comes with inherent weaknesses that can create doubt in a juror's mind.

There are numerous ways to beat a DUI case in Georgia, from unreliable field sobriety tests to inaccurate state-administered breath tests. As a veteran criminal defense lawyer in Bloomingdale, GA, Dennis O'Brien has the knowledge and experience to expose the state's mistakes and fight for your rights. When you hire O'Brien Law Firm PC your chances of dismissal are greatly increased. When your case is dismissed, you can continue living life without the burden of a criminal record.

 Criminal Justice Attorney Bloomingdale, GA

If you or someone you love is accused of a crime in Bloomingdale, GA, don't leave fate up to the prosecution. Take the necessary steps to protect yourself and your family before it's too late.

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Latest News in Bloomingdale, GA

1 MSF Industrial Project Near Savannah Lands $63M Loan

McCraney Property Co. has taken a major step forward in its bid to help plug the gap between supply and demand of premier industrial product near the Port of Savannah now that it has secured approximately $62.8 million in construction financing for Phase I of Logistics 16 at Ottawa Farms in Bloomingdale, Ga.The industrial property owner and developer relied on the assistance of JLL Capital Markets to obtain financing for the project, which will consist of just over 1 million square feet of industrial ...

McCraney Property Co. has taken a major step forward in its bid to help plug the gap between supply and demand of premier industrial product near the Port of Savannah now that it has secured approximately $62.8 million in construction financing for Phase I of Logistics 16 at Ottawa Farms in Bloomingdale, Ga.

The industrial property owner and developer relied on the assistance of JLL Capital Markets to obtain financing for the project, which will consist of just over 1 million square feet of industrial space.

JLL Capital Markets’ Melissa Rose, Michael DiCosimo and Mateo Bolivar spearheaded the team that represented McCraney in landing the financing, which the brokers placed through an unnamed lender in the form of a three-year construction loan. The precarious environment that comes with a recession has not curtailed the lending community’s eagerness to provide funds for the still-thriving industrial sector.

READ ALSO: Why Industrial Outdoor Storage Is the New Hot CRE Type

“There were a variety of capital sources expressing interest in this financing at various leverage points,” Melissa Rose, managing director with JLL Capital Markets, told Commercial Property Executive. “There is still significant capital availability for best-in-class sponsors pursuing Class A developments in high-growth markets at an attractive basis.”

Build here, don’t build here

Logistics 16 will take shape approximately 17 miles west of the heart of Savannah, Ga. The site, located within close proximity of the junction of Interstate 16 and Interstate 95, allows for easy access to the Port of Savannah, which serves as a leading economic engine in the area. “The Port of Savannah is the third busiest in the country and is the primary driver of the industrial boom the Savannah market has experienced as of late,” according to a second quarter 2022 report by CBRE.

Phase I of Logistics 16 will occupy roughly 85 acres at 702 Bloomingdale Road. The 1 million square feet will be divided among three front-load buildings offering the amenities industrial users expect in Class A facilities today, including substantial loading doors, deep truck courts, and ample car and trailer spaces. At full buildout, Logistics 16 will feature nine buildings for a total of 4.5 million square feet of industrial space.

Phase I is likely to be a welcome endeavor and may very well secure commitments before it reaches completion. “Net absorption has mirrored or outpaced deliveries over the course of the last year and challenges to construction continue to loom. Developers simply cannot build new inventory fast enough to keep up with the rampant demand for logistical space,” according to the CBRE report.

On the other hand, the project will not receive a warm reception from everyone. According to the CBRE report, “While there is plenty of land that can be developed, pushback from residents of suburbs such as Garden City, Bloomingdale and Port Wentworth have temporarily stopped industrial rezoning.” McCraney’s acquisition of the land for Logistics 16 was timely, as Bloomingdale was among a handful of cities that imposed a moratorium in the second quarter to temporarily block industrial rezoning.

West Chatham residents speak out against potential rezoning of 630-acre project

BLOOMINGDALE, Ga. (WSAV) – West Chatham County residents are voicing their concerns about the potential rezoning of land next to their neighborhood.Off John Carter Road in Bloomingdale sits 630 acres of undeveloped land. It’s owned by the Savannah Economic Development Authority and officials said they intend for it to be a manufacturing park.Residents who live next to the property said the project is already doing damage to their homes.“My father is 85 years old and within about three to four weeks of t...

BLOOMINGDALE, Ga. (WSAV) – West Chatham County residents are voicing their concerns about the potential rezoning of land next to their neighborhood.

Off John Carter Road in Bloomingdale sits 630 acres of undeveloped land. It’s owned by the Savannah Economic Development Authority and officials said they intend for it to be a manufacturing park.

Residents who live next to the property said the project is already doing damage to their homes.

“My father is 85 years old and within about three to four weeks of the clearing of this property, we noticed differences in our homes and his septic tank would just pour water into it so we had to drop an actual pump in it to keep it operating,” said Cheryl Sanderlin, a resident for 30 years. “We used to have a lot of wildlife in our front yards, we could sit in that big window there and actually see deer eating in our front yards. We don’t see that anymore.”

Residents like Cheryl, many who have lived in the neighborhood for decades, said they feel blindsided and left out of the conversation.

“With our neighborhood backing up to it, with two schools nearby, with 10,000 more homes coming, we are definitely concerned on whether this is something that will make noise all night long, have lights all night long, continue to cause flooding issues,” Cheryl said.

On Saturday, officials from SEDA met with neighbors for the first time. Residents repeatedly asked why the group is trying to rezone the property from Industrial Light to Industrial Heavy, something they believe will only do more harm.

“Our response to that is to best place this manufacturing center, this Class A industrial manufacturing, to be prime real estate for high-wage jobs,” said Jesse Dillon, vice president for business development at SEDA. “Put us in the best possible competitive situation to attract high wages to the community.”

Dillion added that the organization has no intention to cause harm to neighbors. Residents are also calling for more transparency, claiming they were not properly notified of SEDA’s petition to change the zoning.

“There are three ways to notify property owners,” explained Harold Yellin, an attorney representing SEDA. “Advertising, which we did. Notice to neighbors within 300 feet, which we believe was done. And the signs, which we did according to state zoning procedure law. Notwithstanding that we’ll come back and do it again. If we can find property off-site that doesn’t even belong to us but the property owner says it’s OK, we’d otherwise be trespassing but we’re willing to put additional signs.”

Neighbors and SEDA officials said their meeting was productive and the start of finding a solution to make residents more comfortable.

But still, Cheryl is concerned about what will happen to the quiet, peaceful neighborhood she and her family have called home for 30 years.

“I mean, at a certain point can you sleep at night, will the lights be blaring through your window, will the noise be loud?”, she said. “I mean, at a certain point you have to weigh can you still live there?”

The Savannah Metropolitan Planning Commission will take up the rezoning petition at its meeting on September 29th.

This Popular Retail Chain Is Closing Stores Permanently, Starting Sept. 21

It seems like any time you go to the store these days, you could be greeted with a sign informing you that it's closing permanently soon. And that's not just in your head: Store closures are hardly a rare occurrence. A record 12,200 stores closed across the U.S. in 2020 as a result of both the COVID pandemic and the new...

It seems like any time you go to the store these days, you could be greeted with a sign informing you that it's closing permanently soon. And that's not just in your head: Store closures are hardly a rare occurrence. A record 12,200 stores closed across the U.S. in 2020 as a result of both the COVID pandemic and the new push toward e-commerce, according to Fortune. Now, one company that's already had its fair share of closures is shuttering even more locations. Read on to find out what popular retail chain just confirmed permanent closures later this month.

September is already shaping up to be a big month for store closures. A total of 89 in-store pharmacies at Save Mart and Lucky supermarkets in California and Nevada are gearing up to close, with News 4-Fox 11 reporting that at least two closures in Nevada will occur at the start of the month.

In Illinois, a Bloomingdale's in Skokie will start closing down on Sept. 6, CBS News reported. And the popular sports chain Olympia Sports has already confirmed that it plans to shutter all of its remaining retail stores—a total of 35 locations across the country—by the end of September.

But the closures aren't stopping there: Another major retail chain just confirmed that it's shuttering several locations.

CVS is closing several locations in the coming weeks, the Dayton Daily News reported on Aug. 31. According to the newspaper, the popular drugstore chain is permanently shuttering four locations in the greater Dayton, Ohio, area. The closures will affect stores in the following cities: Fairborn, Moraine, Brookville, and New Lebanon. They will be closing on staggered dates between Sept. 21 and Oct. 5, per the Dayton Daily News.

"All prescriptions are being seamlessly transferred to nearby CVS Pharmacy locations, ensuring uninterrupted patient service," Amy Thibault, a spokeswoman for the company, told the newspaper. "We can accommodate 100 percent of colleagues impacted by these decisions, all of whom have been offered comparable roles at our other nearby locations."

Ohio has been hit hard with CVS closures this year. Back in February, the Dayton Daily News reported that the drugstore chain had closed a store in Kettering, the city's largest suburb. And just a few months later, another CVS in Kettering was shuttered, alongside a location in Harrison Township. Most recently, the company permanently shut down a CVS store in Hamilton, according to the Dayton Daily News.

"Maintaining access to pharmacy services in our communities is an important factor we consider when making store closure decisions," Thibault told the newspaper. "Other factors include local market dynamics, population shifts, a community's store density, and ensuring there are other geographic access points to meet the needs of the community, including COVID-19 testing and vaccinations."

The CVS closures aren't just impacting Ohio, however. Over the past several months, the drugstore chain has closed stores all across the U.S., in states like Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Maryland, California, Florida, Texas, and Georgia—just to name a few. And that's hardly surprising given the company's stated plans. Back in Nov. 2021, CVS revealed that it would be closing around 900 stores over the next three years as part of an initiative to implement a "new retail footprint strategy aligned to evolving consumer needs."

CVS confirmed that the closures would start in spring 2022, with around 300 stores being shuttered each year. In a statement to the Dayton Daily News, the company said the decision to close stores over the course of the next three years "follows a deep analytical look at changes in population, consumer buying patterns and future health needs." Simply put, CVS said it "needs to ensure it has the right kinds of stores in the right locations for consumers and for the business."

'It's in your blood': Ottawa Farms' Pete Waller reminisces on decades of farming in Chatham

Pete Waller is a business man by trade but a farmer by heart. The 89- year-old runs an insulation business where he earns most of his living, but his real pride and joy is cultivating the 150-acres of fertile soil that is Ottawa Farms, one of the last remaining farms in Chatham County.Waller spends his mornings herding cattle, running the lengths of green pastures in his tractor and spitting chewing tobacco into a red Solo nestled in the cupholder of his truck.He doesn’t need to be working out in the fields...

Pete Waller is a business man by trade but a farmer by heart. The 89- year-old runs an insulation business where he earns most of his living, but his real pride and joy is cultivating the 150-acres of fertile soil that is Ottawa Farms, one of the last remaining farms in Chatham County.

Waller spends his mornings herding cattle, running the lengths of green pastures in his tractor and spitting chewing tobacco into a red Solo nestled in the cupholder of his truck.

He doesn’t need to be working out in the fields, but he does it anyway.

“I like to smell that dirt when you plow it up,” Waller chuckled. “I enjoy cutting that hay and rolling it back.”

He’s wearing a dress shirt and polka-dot suspenders. But for the purposes of farm work, he’s in denim jeans and sneakers.

“It’s in your blood, you can’t get it out.”

But Waller, a third-generation farmer, recognizes the changing agricultural landscape. He watched the 150 acres of land his grandfather first purchased in 1873 grow to around 800. Now he’s back to 150, as plans to lease and develop the remaining acreage into warehouses come to fruition.

Read more:'Check back in three years': Savannah's record growth exerts pressure on rural communities

“The math is not there to hold onto the land today,” said Waller, speaking of skyrocketing property values pushing out smaller-scale farmers like him. “It’s the writing on the wall.”

Waller, however, is business savvy. He said there’s no plans to sell the land outright as he still owns the parcels.

“You don’t sell the goose that lays the golden egg; we leased the goose,” Waller said with a laugh.

The fight to rezone the land from agricultural to industrial took nearly two years. At the end of that controversial battle in 2021, Waller entered into a contract with the Florida-based McCraney Property Company. Nearly 600 acres of land abutting the green plains of the farm will be razed and turned into warehousing, to the dismay of residents.

“Everybody don’t like change. They want to see a farm,” said Waller, “but they don’t own it … they don’t pay taxes on it.”

Waller stood watch as flocks of black and brown cattle roamed in the tall grass toward the shade of a tree draped in Spanish moss. The rule of thumb is you can’t fall in love with them, he said of the beef cattle.

Once the 10-year warehouse project is complete, the pasture will be gone.

"We saw what was happening"

Waller watched the region transform in the nearly nine decades he’s lived in the city of Bloomingdale. The area once bustled with dairies and vegetable patches. Families owned several acres to farm and raised their own small herd of cattle. In the ‘30s and ‘40s, he said, you either farmed or worked for the railroad.

“We didn’t have trucks coming from Florida bringing in vegetables,” said Waller. “Everything was grown here.”

When Waller took over the farm in his teens after his father’s death, the land had been in his family for at least 70 years. He quit high school and went to work in the shipyard as a machinist, hustling during the day and farming at night.

Even then, farm work was no way to earn money. He found himself in the insulation business. Then, by 23-years-old, he wound up overseeing 700 men at a cement company in North Carolina. Three years later, he returned home.

Waller started running his own insulation business in the early ‘60s while he still worked the farm. But the landscape was shifting.

More:Bloomingdale council: City 'not open for business' for warehouse, apartment development

“We saw what was happening,” he said, “after the I-95 went up.”

Pooler, still one of the fastest growing cities in the region, began to balloon.

Anticipating the risk of Bloomingdale being annexed into its neighboring cities, he, along with four other residents, worked to incorporate the town.

“I took the charter to Atlanta,” Waller said as he recalled his first ever plane trip.

In his office, he pointed to a black and white photo of himself, three other men and then-governor Jimmy Carter smiling with the charter in hand. In 1974, Bloomingdale was incorporated.

Inevitable change

Development continues to explode in the region, transforming the once-sprawling agricultural town. Manufacturing and logistics in the area boomed as the Port of Savannah expanded, growing into one of the busiest ports in the nation.

Today, industrialization is at the heart of residents’ concerns. For Bloomingdale, a city of about 2,600, existence is always in flux. City officials say they’re trying to balance the financial flush warehousing can bring with the quality of life of residents.

Waller knows farming isn’t what’s sustainable here. In 1957 he bought an acre of land for $57, he said. Now that same acre is worth $150,000. The writing is on the wall for all farmers. Even those more inland as growth spills into nearby counties.

Also:Bloomingdale council: City 'not open for business' for warehouse, apartment development

To further supplement his income, Waller opened up the fields to another kind of business – agritourism.

“We were doing this before we realized what it was called,” he said, “We plant about five acres of strawberries every year, three acres of blackberries and five acres of blueberries, all pick-your-own operations.”

The annual strawberry festival is set for this weekend – April 2nd-3rd – and normally attracts up to 10,000 people, said Waller.

Ottawa hosts other attractions as well, such as sunflower picking. For school field trips, he’s installed a giant metal slide, a note he took from the farms up in North Carolina. Nearby is a general store that sells farm-made goods.

A goat that pops its head over a wooden fence is, perhaps, the main attraction. Waller grabs a handful of tobacco and feeds it to him. The goat laps it up, its mouth grinding side to side with sounds of cows mooing in the distance.

“Back then we didn’t have to fence them in,” Waller recalled when his father was alive, “We used to have an open range. Where Home Depot is, we used to run the cows. Where Lowe’s is, we used to run the cows.”

Nancy Guan is the general assignment reporter covering Chatham County municipalities. Reach her at nguan@gannett.com or on Twitter @nancyguann.

Proud to be a Farmer: Pete Waller

BLOOMINGDALE, Ga. (WTOC) - For the Waller family, this time of the year is all about strawberries.This past weekend, they hosted their annual strawberry festival for the first time since 2019.“We enjoy what we do, that’s why we do it,” said Pete Waller, farmer.Pete Waller is a third generation farmer who has been cultivating the land of Chatham County for over 80 years.“We are the last farm in the county. I have managed to hold on, but it has been tough with all the expensive land we have a...

BLOOMINGDALE, Ga. (WTOC) - For the Waller family, this time of the year is all about strawberries.

This past weekend, they hosted their annual strawberry festival for the first time since 2019.

“We enjoy what we do, that’s why we do it,” said Pete Waller, farmer.

Pete Waller is a third generation farmer who has been cultivating the land of Chatham County for over 80 years.

“We are the last farm in the county. I have managed to hold on, but it has been tough with all the expensive land we have around with all the building going on,” said Waller.

Farmers are no stranger to overcoming challenges, something Pete Waller had to do at a young age.

“My dad passed away when I was fifteen and I took over the farm, I have been farming all of my life. It’s in your blood. If you start farming when you’re young, it’s in your blood and you’ll continue on,” said Waller.

One way Waller has continued his family’s farming tradition is by hosting an annual strawberry festival, but strawberries weren’t always in the business plan for the Waller family.

“We planted a half acre of berries, in two weeks we had sold out and didn’t have any berries. That convinced me that I needed to be in the strawberry business. That’s when we started planted strawberries and that was twenty years ago,” said Waller

All these years later a Waller still enjoys welcoming people to his farm, especially school kids that he can teach a thing or two to.

“We enjoy seeing the children come on the school trips. We usually have about ten thousand children in the spring and ten thousand in the fall. I enjoy seeing those little fellers get out and see what real life is about,” said Waller.

No matter the day or time of the year, one thing has been getting Pete Waller out of bed and into his fields for over 80 years.

“I enjoy people, if I didn’t enjoy people I wouldn’t be having these festivals, rodeos and corn mazes,” said Waller.

The Waller family looks to bring people back to their farm with more events later this year.

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