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If you are accused of a crime, the only thing standing between your freedom and a verdict of "guilty" is an experienced criminal defense attorney in Bloomingdale, GA.

Those who have been arrested before know that life in the legal system is no laughing matter. Aside from the imminent ramifications of fines and jail time, any goals you have of bettering yourself and advancing your life could be compromised. Without a trusted attorney by your side, you could face a lifetime of embarrassment and poor employment prospects due to a tarnished criminal record.

The good news? Dennis O'Brien and his team of experienced lawyers in Bloomingdale are ready to clear your name. By retaining the help of a criminal defense attorney early in the legal process, you have a much better chance of securing your freedom and living a life as a productive member of society.

At O'Brien Law Firm PC, our practice was founded to fight for the rights of individuals accused of or charged with a crime. Our team of legal experts is well-equipped to take even the most difficult, contentious cases. From violent felonies to DUI, there is nothing we haven't seen and handled. As a former law enforcement officer, founding attorney Dennis O'Brien knows exactly how much a person can lose if convicted. That's why we work tirelessly to secure a verdict that is favorable for our clients.

Regardless of how serious or minor your case may be, know that we will fight fearlessly on your behalf. You deserve zealous representation - when you hire O'Brien Law Firm PC, you will receive nothing less.

 Drug Lawyer Bloomingdale, GA
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The O'Brien Law Firm PC Difference

Many of our clients are surprised to discover that founding lawyer Dennis O'Brien was a police officer prior to his criminal defense career. As a former Field Training Officer for the Memphis Police Department, he has over two decades of knowledge and experience in the criminal justice system. Dennis truly understands the nuance and complexities involved in a criminal defense case. This rare experience gives Dennis a clear edge in any criminal defense case and gives clients priceless peace of mind when they need it the most. Unlike some criminal defense attorneys in Bloomingdale, Dennis O'Brien and his team believe that every client deserves effective, empathetic legal assistance. While some Bloomingdale criminal defense firms will take weekends off or pass along cases to paralegals, Dennis personally reviews each of his cases. There is no case too small or big for O'Brien Law Firm PC. When you hire our firm, you can rest easy knowing that we will be by your side when the going gets tough.

 Federal Defense Attorney Bloomingdale, GA
Here are just a few reasons why O'Brien Law Firm PC is Bloomingdale's top choice in criminal defense:
  • Vigorous Representation
  • Fierce Dedication to Clients
  • Unmatched Experience
  • Face-to-Face Counsel
  • Prompt Response to Inquiries and Questions
  • Commitment to Defending Your Rights
  • Thorough, Effective Research and Investigation
  • Contact Us or Call: 912-704-5150
 Criminal Defense Law Firms Bloomingdale, GA
Our firm has represented hundreds of criminal defense clients in Bloomingdale and is highly qualified to take your case. Some of our specialties include:

Drug Cases in Bloomingdale, GA

When you are charged with a drug crime in Bloomingdale, it can change your life forever. Georgia imposes very strict punishments for drug offenses. The truth is, it's hard to get your life back on track with a drug charge on your record. Your freedom and way of life could be in the hands of your criminal defense attorney. As such, you need a competent lawyer with years of experience handling drug cases. Leaving your fate in the hands of an incompetent attorney could have long-lasting effects on your family and may result in a conviction.

 Criminal Defense Lawyers Bloomingdale, GA

Consequences for drug crimes in Bloomingdale often include:

  • Jail
  • Prison
  • Heavy fines
  • Community service
  • Court-ordered drug and alcohol counseling
  • Probation or parole
  • Permanent criminal record

While the consequences for a drug crime in Georgia are serious, there's reason to be hopeful: O'Brien Law Firm PC is here to fight for you. Remember - being charged with a drug crime is NOT the same thing as being convicted.

Our stellar team has represented many clients facing numerous drug-related charges. While each situation varies, one constant remains the same for clients facing drug charges: a fear of what lies ahead. At O'Brien Law Firm PC our job is to help you overcome the fear of the unknown. We do so by ensuring you understand your charges, the possible outcomes associated with those charges, and the options you need to consider from a criminal defense standpoint.

With more than a decade of experience as Bloomingdale drug crime attorneys, we have the experience and resources to defend you in court no matter what your charges may be, including:

  • Marijuana
  • Crack
  • Cocaine
  • Heroin
  • Methamphetamine
  • Ecstasy

No matter what charge you are facing, our team has the experience and resources to build a comprehensive defense strategy for your drug case in Bloomingdale, GA. Without a criminal defense attorney acting as your advocate, you could be facing very harsh penalties. Here are a few punishments you could be facing for drug crimes in Bloomingdale:

  • Schedule I or Schedule II Drug Possession
    Schedule I or Schedule II Drug Possession:

    Having less than a gram (or one milliliter for liquids) of this type of drug results in a prison term of one to three years. Having four grams or milliliter carries a term of one to eight years.

  • Schedule III, IV, or V Drug Possession
    Schedule III, IV, or V Drug Possession:

    Any substance on this list is punishable by a prison sentence of one to three years.

  • Non-Narcotic Schedule II Drug Possession
    Non-Narcotic Schedule II Drug Possession:

    If you have less than two grams or milliliters of this substance, punishments can be between one year and three years. Having up to four grams or milliliters results in a prison sentence of one to eight years.

  • Possession of Marijuana
    Possession of Marijuana:

    Those who are in possession of less than an ounce of marijuana are subject to a jail sentence of up to 12 months. Fines may be no more than $1,000. Possession of more than an ounce of marijuana can result in a prison term of one to 10 years.

To avoid these life-changing punishments, you must take action now. Contact O'Brien Law Firm today for a consultation about your case.

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 Defense Lawyers Bloomingdale, GA
 Criminal Defense Attorney Bloomingdale, GA

Violent Crime Cases in Bloomingdale, GA

Violent crime offenses in Bloomingdale typically involve some form of bodily harm to another individual, actions committed against an individual's will, or threatening someone with bodily harm. Aggravated violent offenses are more severe charges and often occur when a violent crime is made more serious due to circumstances like deadly weapons.

Much like serious drug cases, violent crimes create an added layer of negativity that follows the accused for the rest of their life. In these cases, even an accusation is enough to cause irreparable damage to a person's reputation. Those convicted of a violent crime face severe penalties that can include years in a correctional facility.

Common crimes of this nature include but are not limited to:
  • Murder
  • Assault with the intent to murder
  • Vehicular homicide
  • Domestic violence
  • Assault
  • Battery
  • Kidnapping
  • Rape
  • Robbery
  • Carjacking

When you are accused of any of the above crimes, your freedom hangs in the balance. The outcome of your case will determine whether you leave the courtroom with your freedom intact or stripped away to serve time behind bars. Because the punishments for violent crimes are so extreme, you should be seeking legal counsel from a criminal defense attorney in Bloomingdale, GA, as soon as possible. As a former police officer with a long record of positive verdicts in violent crime cases, Dennis O'Brien is well equipped to represent you in court.

Having a criminal defense lawyer by your side is the best way to avoid the serious punishments associated with violent crimes. These punishments usually result in prison time if convicted and include:
Forced rape: 20 years
Armed robbery: Up to 20 years
Simple assault: Up to 12 months
Aggravated assault: 10 to 20 years
Aggravated battery: Up to 20 years
Involuntary manslaughter: One to 20 years
Vehicular homicide Up to 15 years
Murder: Life in prison or the death sentence
Zealous Representation Without Judgement

As a former police officer, Dennis O'Brien has seen the toll it takes on a person when charged with a crime. His time in law enforcement allows him to empathize with his clients who desperately need competent representation. Despite being innocent until proven guilty, accusations are scary, and conviction could be a reality. That is why you must work with a trustworthy criminal defense lawyer in Bloomingdale, GA who will work tirelessly to clear your name.

Clients choose O'Brien Law Firm because we believe in open communication, honesty, and hard work. It is not our job to act as judges for those who have been accused of crimes. Rather, our goal is to find the best defense that allows us to protect our clients' rights and freedoms.

DUI Cases in Bloomingdale, GA

Driving under the influence (DUI) is one of the most common crimes committed in Georgia. Punishments for such a crime can be severe, and for understandable reasons - when a person operates a vehicle while they are intoxicated, they're putting their life and the lives of others at risk.

While DUI is a serious crime that completely upend the accused's life, the earnest desire to end drunk driving can make police officers too eager to catch a person who they believe is under the influence.

 Criminal Defense Law Firm Bloomingdale, GA

The city of Bloomingdale, Georgia, has implemented severe punishments for DUI, even for first-time offenders. Individuals charged with DUI in Bloomingdale could face:

  • Very expensive fines and fees
  • Loss of license
  • Incarceration

Fortunately, if you or someone you love has been charged with DUI, there is hope. This is particularly true when the accused is administered a breath or blood test for DUI. In fact, cases that involve a breath and/or blood test are beaten daily. When you hire O'Brien Law Firm PC, we will dive deep into your DUI case in Bloomingdale and examine every angle possible for your case to be dismissed. Here are just a few questions our team will investigate:

  • Was the stop legal? If not, your case could be dismissed
  • Is there enough evidence or probable cause to arrest you? If not, Dennis O'Brien will file a pre-trial motion and will fight hard to have your case dismissed before trial.
  • Did the police read you your implied consent rights? If not, your case could be thrown out. Failure to read implied consent rights to the accused is one of the most common police errors.
  • Were your blood testing records and breathalyzer results maintained? Breath testing comes with inherent weaknesses that can create doubt in a juror's mind.

There are numerous ways to beat a DUI case in Georgia, from unreliable field sobriety tests to inaccurate state-administered breath tests. As a veteran criminal defense lawyer in Bloomingdale, GA, Dennis O'Brien has the knowledge and experience to expose the state's mistakes and fight for your rights. When you hire O'Brien Law Firm PC your chances of dismissal are greatly increased. When your case is dismissed, you can continue living life without the burden of a criminal record.

 Criminal Justice Attorney Bloomingdale, GA

If you or someone you love is accused of a crime in Bloomingdale, GA, don't leave fate up to the prosecution. Take the necessary steps to protect yourself and your family before it's too late.

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Latest News in Bloomingdale, GA

StyleSeat Announces Inaugural Awards: The Stylies

StyleSeat Continues to Champion Small Businesses by Recognizing Beauty and Wellness Pros on its PlatformSAN FRANCISCO, May 10, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- This week, StyleSeat, the leading destination for booking beauty, grooming, and wellness services, announced the winners of its ...

StyleSeat Continues to Champion Small Businesses by Recognizing Beauty and Wellness Pros on its Platform

SAN FRANCISCO, May 10, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- This week, StyleSeat, the leading destination for booking beauty, grooming, and wellness services, announced the winners of its Inaugural Awards, titled The Stylies.

Created to recognize, honor, and, celebrate the beauty and wellness professionals that help make StyleSeat customers look and feel their best, The Stylies are yet another way that StyleSeat is supporting and providing necessary resources for small businesses.

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"From the beginning, our goal has always been to grow small businesses," said StyleSeat founder and CEO Melody McCloskey. "Whether that's by filling last-minute cancellations or helping our Pros to get paid what they're worth so they can earn more, StyleSeat has helped to generate over $10.6 billion in revenue for small businesses. The Stylies is one of many next steps in helping our deserving Pros continue to grow!"

The Stylies are split into two categories: data-driven and community-driven. The data-driven category, based on data insights from 2021, features the Booked & Busy Award, the Client Choice Award, the Best In Award, and the Brand Ambassador Award. The community-driven category, which is based on word-of-mouth, features the Trendsetter Award and the Wisdom Award.

To be considered, eligible StyleSeat professionals submitted an application through StyleSeat. Nearly 900 submissions were received by the end of the nomination period.

For the Booked & Busy Award, the winners are Vincent Fillah (Olney, MD) and Darylmond Humphrey (Fort Worth, TX).

For the Client Choice Award, the winners are Lacora Lewis (Augusta, GA) and Alberto Delgado (Lubbock, TX).

For the Brand Ambassador Award, the winner is Kimberly Taylor-Green (Fort Wayne, IN).

For the Trendsetter Award, the winners are Gregory Tahir Woods (Atlanta, GA) and Emerald Owens-Taylor (Riverside, CA).

For the Wisdom Award, the winners are Bree'Ana Melick (Columbus, OH) and Thomas D. Slonaker (Phoenix, AZ).

For the Best In Award, the winners are as follows:

To learn more about StyleSeat, please visit www.styleseat.com.

About StyleSeat:StyleSeat is the leading destination for booking beauty, barber and wellness services. Melody McCloskey co-founded StyleSeat in 2011 to simplify the appointment booking process. Since its inception, StyleSeat has powered over 155 million appointments in cities across the United States. With StyleSeat, industry experts gain a place to showcase their work, connect with clients, and build their business, while clients can discover new services and stylists and book appointments on the go. For more information, please visit www.styleseat.com.

SOURCE StyleSeat

Bloomingdale council: City 'not open for business' for warehouse, apartment development

Bloomingdale's city council approved an eight-month moratorium on industrial and multifamily zoning applications during Thursday night's council meeting.The moratorium, effective immediately, will...

Bloomingdale's city council approved an eight-month moratorium on industrial and multifamily zoning applications during Thursday night's council meeting.

The moratorium, effective immediately, will bar any developers from submitting applications that fall under industrial or multifamily builds such as warehouses, apartment complexes and condominiums.

Existing applications won't be affected. City Administrator Charles Akridge said there are about 30 warehouses that have been approved and are waiting to be built. Two multifamily applications for complexes to be built south of Interstate 16 are being considered.

Bloomingdale mayor Dennis Baxter said the hold is so that the city can properly assess their infrastructure capacity and zoning needs. When first elected into office, Baxter said his main priority is making sure the city is balanced.

"That means you can't have one type of zoning ... you need a healthy city," said Baxter.

More:Bloomingdale's new mayor helped Pooler manage its early growth. Can he do the same again?

Bloomingdale is made up largely of residential-agricultural land but is experiencing more commercial growth along the U.S. 80 corridor. Most of the industrial building is located south of the Georgia Central Railway in the southern portion of the city.

Rapid growth in West Chatham has prompted Bloomingdale to take a measured approach in their own city, according to Baxter.

"We need to consider residents' needs," he said.

The city has a population of about 2,800 residents and 1,320 housing units.

Concerns also stem from water and sewer capacity. Bloomingdale currently has a water draw down rate of about 30,000 gallons per day. In 2025, when the Environmental Protection Agency reassess rates, that is most likely to go down, an issue for other Chatham County cities as well.

"We have a limited amount of water and sewer north of I-16," said Baxter.

Making sure the necessary water and sewer infrastructure is in place before homes are built is crucial, Baxter notes.

However, a representative from the Savannah Area Realtors said the pause on industrial and multifamily zoning applications is going to harm economic growth.

"Because of the economic impact of some of these multifamily developments and these industrial developments, there's a lot of money at play," said Cody Jones, government affairs director for the Savannah Area Realtors and the Savannah Multi-list Corporation.

Jones said because this was a zoning issue, more public notice should have been given before the meeting. City council members said they would be looking into the notice requirements.

"The housing market has largely been the economic engine in the state of Georgia and here in Savannah locally," said Jones, "Bloomingdale basically just said 'Where multifamily is concerned we're not open for business'."

Baxter said that the moratorium could end sooner than eight months if they're able to make the proper assessments before then.

Nancy Guan is the general assignment reporter covering Chatham County municipalities. Reach her at nguan@gannett.com or on Twitter @nancyguann.

If You Shop at Macy's, Prepare for This Major Change

For more than 150 years, Macy's has been one of the most iconic names in the department store game. But at the end of 2021, loyal Macy's customers were given some potentially upsetting news: The company announced that it was planning to shutter 125 stores over the next thee years, with 60 closures planned for 2022 alone. That isn't the...

For more than 150 years, Macy's has been one of the most iconic names in the department store game. But at the end of 2021, loyal Macy's customers were given some potentially upsetting news: The company announced that it was planning to shutter 125 stores over the next thee years, with 60 closures planned for 2022 alone. That isn't the only change Macy's is set to initiate this year, however. Read on to find out what else the iconic department store chain has in store for you.

READ THIS NEXT: This Popular Clothing Chain Just Announced It's Closing 240 Stores.

Trends in the retail space have changed significantly over the last few years. Shoppers have moved away from large indoor shopping malls and have instead shifted their focus to smaller suburban centers, like grocery-anchored shopping hubs and strip mills, The Wall Street Journal reported. Brandon Isner, head of Americas retail thought leadership at CBRE Group Inc., told the newspaper that these centers have become the "backbone of retail over the last five to 10 years."

According to CRE, retail availability in both grocery-anchored hubs and strips malls has declined from nearly 13 percent in 2012 to less than 8 percent now—indicating a clear picture of how many retailers have turned their sights on opening stores in these smaller centers. On the other hand, availability at indoor malls has been increasing over the years as retailers close up shops there.

The mass mall exodus has only accelerated. According to The Wall Street Journal, the rise of online shopping and millennial migration to the suburbs have aided in the downfall of malls, but the pandemic significantly exacerbated the shift. In an effort to avoid serious repercussions from the decline of malls, Macy's started opening up smaller department stores in 2020, according to The Wall Street Journal. Dubbed Market by Macy's, the shops are only around 22,000 to 58,000 square feet—making them about one-fifth of the department store chain's original locations.

"It's the Macy's you know and love—just a smaller version," Macy's explains on its website. "Packed with convenient services, fun events & the latest trends, each store is designed to make shopping quick & easy.

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Macy's has opened five Market by Macy's locations over the past two years in Atlanta, Georgia, and throughout Texas—and the results appear promising. Chuck DiGiovanna, Macy's head of real estate, told The Wall Street Journal that not only have these stores successfully attracted new and existing customers, but sales at Market by Macy's for the fourth quarter of 2021 exceeded the company's expectations. The smaller store format also brought in new customers at a higher rate than Macy's regular department stores, DiGiovanna added.

As a result of the positive shopper feedback, Macy's has decided to accelerate its rollout of smaller stores, according to The Wall Street Journal. The company is now planning to add an additional 10 off-mall locations, which will include Market by Macy's shops, as well as other smaller-formatted ventures for the company such as Macy's Backstage, Bloomie's, and Bloomingdale's outlets.

"There are so many people working from home, these suburban power centers have really been strong," DiGiovanna told The Wall Street Journal. "But we were heading in that direction anyway."

READ THIS NEXT: If You Shop at Walmart, Get Ready for These Major Changes.

'It's in your blood': Ottawa Farms' Pete Waller reminisces on decades of farming in Chatham

Pete Waller is a business man by trade but a farmer by heart. The 89- year-old runs an insulation business where he earns most of his living, but his real pride and joy is cultivating the 150-acres of fertile soil that is Ottawa Farms, one of the last remaining farms in Chatham County.Waller spends his mornings herding cattle, running the lengths of green pastures in his tractor and spitting chewing tobacco into a red Solo nestled in the cupholder of his truck.He doesn’t need to be working out in the fields...

Pete Waller is a business man by trade but a farmer by heart. The 89- year-old runs an insulation business where he earns most of his living, but his real pride and joy is cultivating the 150-acres of fertile soil that is Ottawa Farms, one of the last remaining farms in Chatham County.

Waller spends his mornings herding cattle, running the lengths of green pastures in his tractor and spitting chewing tobacco into a red Solo nestled in the cupholder of his truck.

He doesn’t need to be working out in the fields, but he does it anyway.

“I like to smell that dirt when you plow it up,” Waller chuckled. “I enjoy cutting that hay and rolling it back.”

He’s wearing a dress shirt and polka-dot suspenders. But for the purposes of farm work, he’s in denim jeans and sneakers.

“It’s in your blood, you can’t get it out.”

But Waller, a third-generation farmer, recognizes the changing agricultural landscape. He watched the 150 acres of land his grandfather first purchased in 1873 grow to around 800. Now he’s back to 150, as plans to lease and develop the remaining acreage into warehouses come to fruition.

Read more:'Check back in three years': Savannah's record growth exerts pressure on rural communities

“The math is not there to hold onto the land today,” said Waller, speaking of skyrocketing property values pushing out smaller-scale farmers like him. “It’s the writing on the wall.”

Waller, however, is business savvy. He said there’s no plans to sell the land outright as he still owns the parcels.

“You don’t sell the goose that lays the golden egg; we leased the goose,” Waller said with a laugh.

The fight to rezone the land from agricultural to industrial took nearly two years. At the end of that controversial battle in 2021, Waller entered into a contract with the Florida-based McCraney Property Company. Nearly 600 acres of land abutting the green plains of the farm will be razed and turned into warehousing, to the dismay of residents.

“Everybody don’t like change. They want to see a farm,” said Waller, “but they don’t own it … they don’t pay taxes on it.”

Waller stood watch as flocks of black and brown cattle roamed in the tall grass toward the shade of a tree draped in Spanish moss. The rule of thumb is you can’t fall in love with them, he said of the beef cattle.

Once the 10-year warehouse project is complete, the pasture will be gone.

"We saw what was happening"

Waller watched the region transform in the nearly nine decades he’s lived in the city of Bloomingdale. The area once bustled with dairies and vegetable patches. Families owned several acres to farm and raised their own small herd of cattle. In the ‘30s and ‘40s, he said, you either farmed or worked for the railroad.

“We didn’t have trucks coming from Florida bringing in vegetables,” said Waller. “Everything was grown here.”

When Waller took over the farm in his teens after his father’s death, the land had been in his family for at least 70 years. He quit high school and went to work in the shipyard as a machinist, hustling during the day and farming at night.

Even then, farm work was no way to earn money. He found himself in the insulation business. Then, by 23-years-old, he wound up overseeing 700 men at a cement company in North Carolina. Three years later, he returned home.

Waller started running his own insulation business in the early ‘60s while he still worked the farm. But the landscape was shifting.

More:Bloomingdale council: City 'not open for business' for warehouse, apartment development

“We saw what was happening,” he said, “after the I-95 went up.”

Pooler, still one of the fastest growing cities in the region, began to balloon.

Anticipating the risk of Bloomingdale being annexed into its neighboring cities, he, along with four other residents, worked to incorporate the town.

“I took the charter to Atlanta,” Waller said as he recalled his first ever plane trip.

In his office, he pointed to a black and white photo of himself, three other men and then-governor Jimmy Carter smiling with the charter in hand. In 1974, Bloomingdale was incorporated.

Inevitable change

Development continues to explode in the region, transforming the once-sprawling agricultural town. Manufacturing and logistics in the area boomed as the Port of Savannah expanded, growing into one of the busiest ports in the nation.

Today, industrialization is at the heart of residents’ concerns. For Bloomingdale, a city of about 2,600, existence is always in flux. City officials say they’re trying to balance the financial flush warehousing can bring with the quality of life of residents.

Waller knows farming isn’t what’s sustainable here. In 1957 he bought an acre of land for $57, he said. Now that same acre is worth $150,000. The writing is on the wall for all farmers. Even those more inland as growth spills into nearby counties.

Also:Bloomingdale council: City 'not open for business' for warehouse, apartment development

To further supplement his income, Waller opened up the fields to another kind of business – agritourism.

“We were doing this before we realized what it was called,” he said, “We plant about five acres of strawberries every year, three acres of blackberries and five acres of blueberries, all pick-your-own operations.”

The annual strawberry festival is set for this weekend – April 2nd-3rd – and normally attracts up to 10,000 people, said Waller.

Ottawa hosts other attractions as well, such as sunflower picking. For school field trips, he’s installed a giant metal slide, a note he took from the farms up in North Carolina. Nearby is a general store that sells farm-made goods.

A goat that pops its head over a wooden fence is, perhaps, the main attraction. Waller grabs a handful of tobacco and feeds it to him. The goat laps it up, its mouth grinding side to side with sounds of cows mooing in the distance.

“Back then we didn’t have to fence them in,” Waller recalled when his father was alive, “We used to have an open range. Where Home Depot is, we used to run the cows. Where Lowe’s is, we used to run the cows.”

Nancy Guan is the general assignment reporter covering Chatham County municipalities. Reach her at nguan@gannett.com or on Twitter @nancyguann.

Proud to be a Farmer: Pete Waller

BLOOMINGDALE, Ga. (WTOC) - For the Waller family, this time of the year is all about strawberries.This past weekend, they hosted their annual strawberry festival for the first time since 2019.“We enjoy what we do, that’s why we do it,” said Pete Waller, farmer.Pete Waller is a third generation farmer who has been cultivating the land of Chatham County for over 80 years.“We are the last farm in the county. I have managed to hold on, but it has been tough with all the expensive land we have a...

BLOOMINGDALE, Ga. (WTOC) - For the Waller family, this time of the year is all about strawberries.

This past weekend, they hosted their annual strawberry festival for the first time since 2019.

“We enjoy what we do, that’s why we do it,” said Pete Waller, farmer.

Pete Waller is a third generation farmer who has been cultivating the land of Chatham County for over 80 years.

“We are the last farm in the county. I have managed to hold on, but it has been tough with all the expensive land we have around with all the building going on,” said Waller.

Farmers are no stranger to overcoming challenges, something Pete Waller had to do at a young age.

“My dad passed away when I was fifteen and I took over the farm, I have been farming all of my life. It’s in your blood. If you start farming when you’re young, it’s in your blood and you’ll continue on,” said Waller.

One way Waller has continued his family’s farming tradition is by hosting an annual strawberry festival, but strawberries weren’t always in the business plan for the Waller family.

“We planted a half acre of berries, in two weeks we had sold out and didn’t have any berries. That convinced me that I needed to be in the strawberry business. That’s when we started planted strawberries and that was twenty years ago,” said Waller

All these years later a Waller still enjoys welcoming people to his farm, especially school kids that he can teach a thing or two to.

“We enjoy seeing the children come on the school trips. We usually have about ten thousand children in the spring and ten thousand in the fall. I enjoy seeing those little fellers get out and see what real life is about,” said Waller.

No matter the day or time of the year, one thing has been getting Pete Waller out of bed and into his fields for over 80 years.

“I enjoy people, if I didn’t enjoy people I wouldn’t be having these festivals, rodeos and corn mazes,” said Waller.

The Waller family looks to bring people back to their farm with more events later this year.

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