Criminal Defense Attorney in Bloomingdale, GA.

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Drug Attorney Bloomingdale, GA
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 Drug Defense Lawyer Bloomingdale, GA
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If you are accused of a crime, the only thing standing between your freedom and a verdict of "guilty" is an experienced criminal defense attorney in Bloomingdale, GA.

Those who have been arrested before know that life in the legal system is no laughing matter. Aside from the imminent ramifications of fines and jail time, any goals you have of bettering yourself and advancing your life could be compromised. Without a trusted attorney by your side, you could face a lifetime of embarrassment and poor employment prospects due to a tarnished criminal record.

The good news? Dennis O'Brien and his team of experienced lawyers in Bloomingdale are ready to clear your name. By retaining the help of a criminal defense attorney early in the legal process, you have a much better chance of securing your freedom and living a life as a productive member of society.

At O'Brien Law Firm PC, our practice was founded to fight for the rights of individuals accused of or charged with a crime. Our team of legal experts is well-equipped to take even the most difficult, contentious cases. From violent felonies to DUI, there is nothing we haven't seen and handled. As a former law enforcement officer, founding attorney Dennis O'Brien knows exactly how much a person can lose if convicted. That's why we work tirelessly to secure a verdict that is favorable for our clients.

Regardless of how serious or minor your case may be, know that we will fight fearlessly on your behalf. You deserve zealous representation - when you hire O'Brien Law Firm PC, you will receive nothing less.

 Drug Lawyer Bloomingdale, GA
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The O'Brien Law Firm PC Difference

Many of our clients are surprised to discover that founding lawyer Dennis O'Brien was a police officer prior to his criminal defense career. As a former Field Training Officer for the Memphis Police Department, he has over two decades of knowledge and experience in the criminal justice system. Dennis truly understands the nuance and complexities involved in a criminal defense case. This rare experience gives Dennis a clear edge in any criminal defense case and gives clients priceless peace of mind when they need it the most. Unlike some criminal defense attorneys in Bloomingdale, Dennis O'Brien and his team believe that every client deserves effective, empathetic legal assistance. While some Bloomingdale criminal defense firms will take weekends off or pass along cases to paralegals, Dennis personally reviews each of his cases. There is no case too small or big for O'Brien Law Firm PC. When you hire our firm, you can rest easy knowing that we will be by your side when the going gets tough.

 Federal Defense Attorney Bloomingdale, GA
Here are just a few reasons why O'Brien Law Firm PC is Bloomingdale's top choice in criminal defense:
  • Vigorous Representation
  • Fierce Dedication to Clients
  • Unmatched Experience
  • Face-to-Face Counsel
  • Prompt Response to Inquiries and Questions
  • Commitment to Defending Your Rights
  • Thorough, Effective Research and Investigation
  • Contact Us or Call: 912-704-5150
 Criminal Defense Law Firms Bloomingdale, GA
Our firm has represented hundreds of criminal defense clients in Bloomingdale and is highly qualified to take your case. Some of our specialties include:

Drug Cases in Bloomingdale, GA

When you are charged with a drug crime in Bloomingdale, it can change your life forever. Georgia imposes very strict punishments for drug offenses. The truth is, it's hard to get your life back on track with a drug charge on your record. Your freedom and way of life could be in the hands of your criminal defense attorney. As such, you need a competent lawyer with years of experience handling drug cases. Leaving your fate in the hands of an incompetent attorney could have long-lasting effects on your family and may result in a conviction.

 Criminal Defense Lawyers Bloomingdale, GA

Consequences for drug crimes in Bloomingdale often include:

  • Jail
  • Prison
  • Heavy fines
  • Community service
  • Court-ordered drug and alcohol counseling
  • Probation or parole
  • Permanent criminal record

While the consequences for a drug crime in Georgia are serious, there's reason to be hopeful: O'Brien Law Firm PC is here to fight for you. Remember - being charged with a drug crime is NOT the same thing as being convicted.

Our stellar team has represented many clients facing numerous drug-related charges. While each situation varies, one constant remains the same for clients facing drug charges: a fear of what lies ahead. At O'Brien Law Firm PC our job is to help you overcome the fear of the unknown. We do so by ensuring you understand your charges, the possible outcomes associated with those charges, and the options you need to consider from a criminal defense standpoint.

With more than a decade of experience as Bloomingdale drug crime attorneys, we have the experience and resources to defend you in court no matter what your charges may be, including:

  • Marijuana
  • Crack
  • Cocaine
  • Heroin
  • Methamphetamine
  • Ecstasy

No matter what charge you are facing, our team has the experience and resources to build a comprehensive defense strategy for your drug case in Bloomingdale, GA. Without a criminal defense attorney acting as your advocate, you could be facing very harsh penalties. Here are a few punishments you could be facing for drug crimes in Bloomingdale:

  • Schedule I or Schedule II Drug Possession
    Schedule I or Schedule II Drug Possession:

    Having less than a gram (or one milliliter for liquids) of this type of drug results in a prison term of one to three years. Having four grams or milliliter carries a term of one to eight years.

  • Schedule III, IV, or V Drug Possession
    Schedule III, IV, or V Drug Possession:

    Any substance on this list is punishable by a prison sentence of one to three years.

  • Non-Narcotic Schedule II Drug Possession
    Non-Narcotic Schedule II Drug Possession:

    If you have less than two grams or milliliters of this substance, punishments can be between one year and three years. Having up to four grams or milliliters results in a prison sentence of one to eight years.

  • Possession of Marijuana
    Possession of Marijuana:

    Those who are in possession of less than an ounce of marijuana are subject to a jail sentence of up to 12 months. Fines may be no more than $1,000. Possession of more than an ounce of marijuana can result in a prison term of one to 10 years.

To avoid these life-changing punishments, you must take action now. Contact O'Brien Law Firm today for a consultation about your case.

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 Defense Lawyers Bloomingdale, GA
 Criminal Defense Attorney Bloomingdale, GA

Violent Crime Cases in Bloomingdale, GA

Violent crime offenses in Bloomingdale typically involve some form of bodily harm to another individual, actions committed against an individual's will, or threatening someone with bodily harm. Aggravated violent offenses are more severe charges and often occur when a violent crime is made more serious due to circumstances like deadly weapons.

Much like serious drug cases, violent crimes create an added layer of negativity that follows the accused for the rest of their life. In these cases, even an accusation is enough to cause irreparable damage to a person's reputation. Those convicted of a violent crime face severe penalties that can include years in a correctional facility.

Common crimes of this nature include but are not limited to:
  • Murder
  • Assault with the intent to murder
  • Vehicular homicide
  • Domestic violence
  • Assault
  • Battery
  • Kidnapping
  • Rape
  • Robbery
  • Carjacking

When you are accused of any of the above crimes, your freedom hangs in the balance. The outcome of your case will determine whether you leave the courtroom with your freedom intact or stripped away to serve time behind bars. Because the punishments for violent crimes are so extreme, you should be seeking legal counsel from a criminal defense attorney in Bloomingdale, GA, as soon as possible. As a former police officer with a long record of positive verdicts in violent crime cases, Dennis O'Brien is well equipped to represent you in court.

Having a criminal defense lawyer by your side is the best way to avoid the serious punishments associated with violent crimes. These punishments usually result in prison time if convicted and include:
Forced rape: 20 years
Armed robbery: Up to 20 years
Simple assault: Up to 12 months
Aggravated assault: 10 to 20 years
Aggravated battery: Up to 20 years
Involuntary manslaughter: One to 20 years
Vehicular homicide Up to 15 years
Murder: Life in prison or the death sentence
Zealous Representation Without Judgement

As a former police officer, Dennis O'Brien has seen the toll it takes on a person when charged with a crime. His time in law enforcement allows him to empathize with his clients who desperately need competent representation. Despite being innocent until proven guilty, accusations are scary, and conviction could be a reality. That is why you must work with a trustworthy criminal defense lawyer in Bloomingdale, GA who will work tirelessly to clear your name.

Clients choose O'Brien Law Firm because we believe in open communication, honesty, and hard work. It is not our job to act as judges for those who have been accused of crimes. Rather, our goal is to find the best defense that allows us to protect our clients' rights and freedoms.

DUI Cases in Bloomingdale, GA

Driving under the influence (DUI) is one of the most common crimes committed in Georgia. Punishments for such a crime can be severe, and for understandable reasons - when a person operates a vehicle while they are intoxicated, they're putting their life and the lives of others at risk.

While DUI is a serious crime that completely upend the accused's life, the earnest desire to end drunk driving can make police officers too eager to catch a person who they believe is under the influence.

 Criminal Defense Law Firm Bloomingdale, GA

The city of Bloomingdale, Georgia, has implemented severe punishments for DUI, even for first-time offenders. Individuals charged with DUI in Bloomingdale could face:

  • Very expensive fines and fees
  • Loss of license
  • Incarceration

Fortunately, if you or someone you love has been charged with DUI, there is hope. This is particularly true when the accused is administered a breath or blood test for DUI. In fact, cases that involve a breath and/or blood test are beaten daily. When you hire O'Brien Law Firm PC, we will dive deep into your DUI case in Bloomingdale and examine every angle possible for your case to be dismissed. Here are just a few questions our team will investigate:

  • Was the stop legal? If not, your case could be dismissed
  • Is there enough evidence or probable cause to arrest you? If not, Dennis O'Brien will file a pre-trial motion and will fight hard to have your case dismissed before trial.
  • Did the police read you your implied consent rights? If not, your case could be thrown out. Failure to read implied consent rights to the accused is one of the most common police errors.
  • Were your blood testing records and breathalyzer results maintained? Breath testing comes with inherent weaknesses that can create doubt in a juror's mind.

There are numerous ways to beat a DUI case in Georgia, from unreliable field sobriety tests to inaccurate state-administered breath tests. As a veteran criminal defense lawyer in Bloomingdale, GA, Dennis O'Brien has the knowledge and experience to expose the state's mistakes and fight for your rights. When you hire O'Brien Law Firm PC your chances of dismissal are greatly increased. When your case is dismissed, you can continue living life without the burden of a criminal record.

 Criminal Justice Attorney Bloomingdale, GA

If you or someone you love is accused of a crime in Bloomingdale, GA, don't leave fate up to the prosecution. Take the necessary steps to protect yourself and your family before it's too late.

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Latest News in Bloomingdale, GA

Chatham County walks away from latest offer in LOST negotiations

Chatham County still does not have consensus on LOST breakdown weeks before year-end deadline.In a Tweet, Savannah Mayor Van Johnson stated that Chatham County has, once again, walked away from the cities' latest offer during a contentious round of Local Option Sales Tax (LOST) negotiations that began in July of this year.Johnson Tweeted shortly after 1 p.m.: "Chatham County walks away from an offer that would net the County an additional $102 million in additional tax revenue. For #Savannah this is not a ...

Chatham County still does not have consensus on LOST breakdown weeks before year-end deadline.

In a Tweet, Savannah Mayor Van Johnson stated that Chatham County has, once again, walked away from the cities' latest offer during a contentious round of Local Option Sales Tax (LOST) negotiations that began in July of this year.

Johnson Tweeted shortly after 1 p.m.: "Chatham County walks away from an offer that would net the County an additional $102 million in additional tax revenue. For #Savannah this is not a 'plot or a ploy.' This is real life - involving real dollars & real people. #WeAreAllLOST."

The latest mediation session between the county's eight municipal governments — Savannah, Pooler, Port Wentworth, Garden City, Bloomingdale, Thunderbolt, Tybee Island and Vernonburg — and the county government began at 11 a.m. this morning behind closed doors at the Oliver Maner LLP offices in Savannah.

About three hours later, the mediation ended with still no consensus on how to distribute around $1 billion in tax revenue generated by the 1% tax levy over the next 10 years. If the parties do not reach an agreement by year's end, the LOST certificate will expire and so will the ability to collect millions in annual funds that are used to offset property taxes for residents and business owners throughout the county.

To bring back the tax levy, a referendum will have to be voted on by residents.

The latest offer from the municipalities presented the county with two options: the county takes 26% of the funding, an immediate 3% increase from their current share, and the cities take 74%. Or, the county starts with its current share (23%) with incremental increases to 31% throughout the 10-year funding cycle.

The county rejected both offers.

"They want us to wait 10 years to get to 31% and that’s not workable," said Chester A. Ellis, chairman of the Chatham County Commission. "Everybody agrees to the 31. It's just how you get to the 31% — it needs to be there sooner rather than later."

The city of Savannah, which is the lead on negotiations for the municipalities, offered another compromise: that the county share starts at 26% and increases to 31% within five years. The proposal would have netted the county an additional $102 million over ten years compared to their current LOST breakdown (23%).

According to city leaders, Savannah also stipulated that Chatham County give an annual $300,000 stipend for Tybee Island's beach renourishment efforts, a costly project that protects the barrier island's shoreline.

"We’re supposed to be negotiating percentages, not beach renourishment," said Ellis, "They're not negotiating in good faith."

The county's push for a larger cut stems from growing costs to provide 31 essential services to all residents, according to Ellis. Over the last decade, costs to provide services such as the court system and emergency services increased by $54 million, according to the county's accounting.

“When you look at what it’s costing the county to provide those essential services … the prices keep going up,” said Ellis to the Savannah Morning News in a previous article.

Ellis said that the county, instead, proposed that its share start at 26% next year, increase to 28% in 2024 and increase again to 31% in 2025. Municipal leaders rejected the counterproposal.

Public negotiations on how much LOST funding each party deserves began in July of this year. Ellis had requested the county's LOST share increase to 50% (with the eight cities splitting the remaining 50% largely based on population). The proposal was a 27% increase from its current 23% share. According to 2021 numbers, the county received about $22.4 million from LOST funds.

The eight cities collectively received around $75 million in 2021. Some city officials have stated that LOST funding makes up a significant portion of the city's overall budget. For Pooler, the second largest city in the county after Savannah, LOST is the second-largest revenue source that funds basic services in the city, according to Mayor Rebecca Benton.

Municipalities refused the 50/50 offer, citing exorbitant property tax increases should the county suddenly hike its share to half of all LOST proceeds. The parties stalled at an impasse, leading to closed-door mediation sessions that ultimately did not result in an agreement in the fall.

In the last two weeks, news of continuing LOST negotiations re-emerged with the county and cities exchanging proposals and counterproposals, as pressure to reach a consensus mounts with only 23 days left in the year.

On Nov. 22, the county rejected the municipalities’ Nov. 17 proposal to keep the breakdown at its current status: 23% for the county and 77% for municipalities.

Instead, Ellis proposed a 31/69 divide with the county share growing 2% annually during the decade-long cycle, eventually resulting in a 49% share for the county, which was close to the 50/50 split initially suggested during public negotiation sessions in July. Ellis cited the growing cost of county-funded essential services such as the court system and emergency services for the increase in funding.

Johnson countered that the “county’s poorest neighborhoods” will bear the brunt of a tax increase." He, along with other city officials, stated that increased funds for the county would come at a cost to the municipalities -- where about 70% of the county population lives.

A week later, the mayors of eight municipalities sent a new proposal, stating that they would be willing to negotiate up to a 31%-69% divide, in order to avoid property takes hikes for incorporated city residents, and to prevent the LOST certificate from expiring without an agreement.

During a Dec. 2 Chatham Commission meeting, commissioners voted to support a 31/69 divide. However, on Dec. 5, Johnson responded with a letter stating that they would only support an incremental increase to 31% for the county, rather than an immediate change.

Wednesday's mediation session was prompted by the letter which offered the county the two options, which was rejected.

“The Municipalities cannot agree to anything other than a gradual increase to 31%. The choice between these options is yours to make,” wrote Johnson.

City officials are planning a press conference Thursday morning at 9 a.m. at Wright Square in downtown Savannah.

Nancy Guan is the general assignment reporter for Savannah Morning News. You can reach her at NGuan@gannett.com.

Legendary retailer closing over 100 department stores starting this month – is your area affected

MACY'S has started closing stores as it targets to close 125 locations in three years.The legendary big-box retailer aims to shutter nearly a fifth of their U.S. stores by the end of 2023.The company plans to close 33 stores across the U.S. by the end of December 2022.The store closures will impact 18 different states across the nation.California and Washington state will have three locations permanently shuttered.The oth...

MACY'S has started closing stores as it targets to close 125 locations in three years.

The legendary big-box retailer aims to shutter nearly a fifth of their U.S. stores by the end of 2023.

The company plans to close 33 stores across the U.S. by the end of December 2022.

The store closures will impact 18 different states across the nation.

California and Washington state will have three locations permanently shuttered.

The other 16 states with Macy's store closures are New Jersey, Florida, Texas, Hawaii, Florida, North Carolina, Georgia, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maryland, New York, Illinois, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Indiana.

"Stores remain an integral part of our omnichannel retail ecosystem," Macy's said in a statement to USA Today.

"As our business evolves, we continue to optimize and reposition our store fleet to more effectively support our omnichannel sales growth and expand market share."

At the beginning of 2020, Macy's operated 777 Macy's and Bloomingdale's storefronts and their goal is to get closer to 650 stores.

The company closed 52 stores in 2021.

Macy's Corporation closed three stores by the end of the third quarter in 2022, bringing their retail inventory to 722 stores.

In order to get to the stated goal, the corporation must close around 70 storefronts.

The company has moved sales to focus more on online fulfillment.

Macy's recognizes that their online sales tend to be higher in areas where storefronts also exist.

"Digital performance is stronger in the markets where we have stores," CFO Adrian Mitchell said in an earnings conference call.

Macy's stock price has lost 6.73percent of its value since the beginning of the year, ending at a price of $20.65.

Year over year sales declined by 3.1percent in Q3 this year.

Still, executives believe the store closures are putting the company in a healthier financial position and remain optimistic about the company's future.

"Retail is detail, and our talented and agile team are executing well to compete," Macy's CEO, Jeff Gennette, said in the Q3 earnings brief.

"We know the consumer is under increasing pressure and has choices on where to spend. As a leading gifting destination with fresh inventory across the value spectrum, we are ready to meet our customers’ needs this holiday season."

Macy's did not respond to requests for comment.

UPDATED: Daily Data: Wednesday, Dec. 28

WRESTLINGBurton Richards MemorialAt Eau ClaireTeam ScoresDecatur 158, Hartford 158, Brandywine 136, Buchanan 134, Centreville 118.5, Delton-Kellogg 94, Olivet 90, Eau Claire 72, Gobles 59, Watervliet 55, Marcellus 52, Berrien Springs 36, Cassopolis 35, Galesburg-Augusta 21, Lawrence 21, River Valley 18Championship Round106: Josmar Perez (BW) p. Holden Carrington (BU) 0:30; 113: Ernesto Rodarte (H) p...

WRESTLING

Burton Richards Memorial

At Eau Claire

Team Scores

Decatur 158, Hartford 158, Brandywine 136, Buchanan 134, Centreville 118.5, Delton-Kellogg 94, Olivet 90, Eau Claire 72, Gobles 59, Watervliet 55, Marcellus 52, Berrien Springs 36, Cassopolis 35, Galesburg-Augusta 21, Lawrence 21, River Valley 18

Championship Round

106: Josmar Perez (BW) p. Holden Carrington (BU) 0:30; 113: Ernesto Rodarte (H) p. Noe Arreola-Santoz (H) 0:53; 120: Kaiden Rieth (BW) d. Luke Isbrecht (W) 7-4; 126: Alejandro Saldana (H) p. Gage Vincent (DK) 1:52; 132: Guage Stampfler (DK) d. Drake Heath (BW) 9-3; 138: Rowan Bradford (D) p. Gabriel Spencer (GA) N/A; 144: Trenton Mansfield (G) d. Noah Brooks (CE) 8-4; 150: Braeden Kirkhead (H) p. Lukas Brooks (CE) 3:06’ 157: Brody Mead (D) Brayden Sebasty (BU) 4:58; 165: Tyler Schoefield (O) m.d. Gavin Schoff (BW) 11-1; 175: Zach Wiggins (D) p. Jackson Stames (BU) 3:15; 190: Eli De Young (G) d. Ismael Pena (DE) 9-3; 215: Dean Roberts (BU) p. Tanner Shugars (D) 3:22; 285: Philip McLaurin (BW) d. Brayden Ross (D) 6-3

Consolation Round

106: Rockne Hamilton (CE) t.f. Joel Pena (D) 15-0; 113: Brandon Menning (CA) p. Matt Veach (BW) 4:26; 120: Roman Rodarte (H) d. Richie DeSantis (BU) 8-3; 126: Kam Smith (W) p. Giovanni Alvarado (EC) 1:58; 132: Angel Guzman-Valle (EC) d. Armando Garcia (H) 7-0; 138: Rylan Mead (D) Dylan Russell (BS) 5-4; 144: Jack Lantz (RV) d. Roman Alvarado (EC) 4-0; 150: Keane Yanez (EC) d. Carson Shugars (D) 7-5; 157: Harrison Gregory (CE) p. Wyatt Korst (M) 1:00; 165: Lee Payne (BU) p. Jaren Waldschmidt (CA) 1:59; 175: Ben Kelenski (O) Gavin Bunning (CE) 2:17; 190: Luke Watson (DK) wins by injury default over Joey LaSalle (O); 215: Govani Gonzalex-Perez (H) p. Conner Tangeman (L) 3:29; 285: Laken Piepkow (O) p. Ryder Andersen (BU) 2:19

EDWARDSBURG 42, PAW PAW 33

At Paw Paw

106: Kainan Teske (PP) p. Brady Halfman 4:33; 113: Caden Manfred (ED) wins by forfeit;120: Taurin Zimpleman (ED) d. Tyler Perkkio 13-10; 126: Gavin Vyverman (PP) p. Logan Swearinger 2:50; 132: Braden Lundgren (ED) d. Logan Motter 8-3; 138: Andrew Castelucci (ED) p. Alexander McNeil 3:20; 144: Colten Strawderman (ED) p. Alex Burgess 2:20; 150: Nolan Berglin (PP) p. Jayden Slough 1:05; 157: Landon Buhl (PP) p. Ethan Herring 0:23; 165: Fisher Edwards (PP) d. Zachary Zache 11-10; 175: Nathan Andrina (ED) p. Cody Connoly 1:12; 190: Gavin Turk (PP) p. Brenden Seabolt 2:29; 215: Andrew Harris (ED) p. Cameron Kozel 2:41; 285: Elliott Roseberry Jr. (ED) p. Braylon Kennedy 2:59

EDWARDSBURG 61, VICKSBURG 18

106: Braeden Mourey (V) p. Brady Halfman 0:42; 113: Caden Manfred (ED) wins by forfeit; 120: Taurin Zimpleman (ED) p. Ben Culver 3:20; 126: JP Culver (V) p. Logan Swearinger 1:44; 132: Braden Lundgren (ED) d. Breckin Meeks 6-4; 138: Andrew Castelucci (ED) m.d. Caden Town 13-3; 144: Colten Strawderman (ED) p. Skye Smith 0:59; 150: Jayden Slough (ED) p. Mitchell Graham 1:37; 157: Daxton Rugg (V) p. Hudson Fields 3:35; 165: Nathan Andrina (ED) p. Hunter Town 2:57; 175: Brenden Seabolt (ED) p. Ty Barnes 1:23; 190: Gavin Ziska (ED) p. Brayden Dugray 1:57; 215: Andrew Harris (ED) p. Brandon DePlanche 0:18; 285: Elliott Roseberry Jr. (ED) p. Grant Daniels 1:48

BUCHANAN 60, BLOOMINGDALE 12

At Buchanan

106: Holden Carrington (BU) P. Molly Menzel N/A; 113: Camden Stover (BU) wins by forfeit; 120: Sadie Holloway (BU) wins by forfeit; 126: Richie DeSantis (BU) wins by forfeit; 132: Double forfeit 138: Troy Zuck (BL) p. Avery Scanlon N/A; 144: Gary Nagy (BL) wins by forfeit; 150: Double forfeit 157: Caleb Sweeney (BU) p. Marshall VanKloupenberg N/A; 165: Leland Payne (BU) p. Kameron Armijo N/A; 175: Jackson Starnes (BU) wins by forfeit; 190: Lucas Zeiger (BU) p. Terrance Payne N/A; 215: Dean Roberts (BU) p. Rowan Hegelman N/A; 285: Ryder Andersen (BU) wins by forfeit

BUCHANAN 66, COMSTOCK 18

106: Holden Carrington (BU) wins by forfeit; 113: Camden Stover (BU) wins by forfeit; 120: Sadie Holloway (BU) wins by forfeit; 126: Richie DeSantis (BU) p. Kamarea Johnson N/A; 132: Maxwell Keith (BU) wins by forfeit; 138: Avery Scanlon (BU) wins by forfeit; 144: Gabriel Liedeke (CO) wins by forfeit; 150: Dale Weed (CO) wins by forfeit; 157: Caleb Sweeney (BU) p. Wesley Boland N/A; 165: Leland Payne (BU) wins by forfeit; 175: Jackson Starnes (BU) p. Titus Moore N/A; 190: Lucas Zeiger (BU) wins by forfeit; 215: Dean Roberts (BU) wins by forfeit; 285: Ryder Andersen (BU) p. Anton White N/A

GIRLS WRESTLING

Clinton Tournament

At Clinton

Brandywine Results

100: Anabel Ocamp 1-2, fourth place

145: Maddison Ward 4-0, first place

More Sports

West Chatham residents speak out against potential rezoning of 630-acre project

BLOOMINGDALE, Ga. (WSAV) – West Chatham County residents are voicing their concerns about the potential rezoning of land next to their neighborhood.Off John Carter Road in Bloomingdale sits 630 acres of undeveloped land. It’s owned by the Savannah Economic Development Authority and officials said they intend for it to be a manufacturing park.Residents who live next to the property said the project is already doing damage to their homes.“My father is 85 years old and within about three to four weeks of t...

BLOOMINGDALE, Ga. (WSAV) – West Chatham County residents are voicing their concerns about the potential rezoning of land next to their neighborhood.

Off John Carter Road in Bloomingdale sits 630 acres of undeveloped land. It’s owned by the Savannah Economic Development Authority and officials said they intend for it to be a manufacturing park.

Residents who live next to the property said the project is already doing damage to their homes.

“My father is 85 years old and within about three to four weeks of the clearing of this property, we noticed differences in our homes and his septic tank would just pour water into it so we had to drop an actual pump in it to keep it operating,” said Cheryl Sanderlin, a resident for 30 years. “We used to have a lot of wildlife in our front yards, we could sit in that big window there and actually see deer eating in our front yards. We don’t see that anymore.”

Residents like Cheryl, many who have lived in the neighborhood for decades, said they feel blindsided and left out of the conversation.

“With our neighborhood backing up to it, with two schools nearby, with 10,000 more homes coming, we are definitely concerned on whether this is something that will make noise all night long, have lights all night long, continue to cause flooding issues,” Cheryl said.

On Saturday, officials from SEDA met with neighbors for the first time. Residents repeatedly asked why the group is trying to rezone the property from Industrial Light to Industrial Heavy, something they believe will only do more harm.

“Our response to that is to best place this manufacturing center, this Class A industrial manufacturing, to be prime real estate for high-wage jobs,” said Jesse Dillon, vice president for business development at SEDA. “Put us in the best possible competitive situation to attract high wages to the community.”

Dillion added that the organization has no intention to cause harm to neighbors. Residents are also calling for more transparency, claiming they were not properly notified of SEDA’s petition to change the zoning.

“There are three ways to notify property owners,” explained Harold Yellin, an attorney representing SEDA. “Advertising, which we did. Notice to neighbors within 300 feet, which we believe was done. And the signs, which we did according to state zoning procedure law. Notwithstanding that we’ll come back and do it again. If we can find property off-site that doesn’t even belong to us but the property owner says it’s OK, we’d otherwise be trespassing but we’re willing to put additional signs.”

Neighbors and SEDA officials said their meeting was productive and the start of finding a solution to make residents more comfortable.

But still, Cheryl is concerned about what will happen to the quiet, peaceful neighborhood she and her family have called home for 30 years.

“I mean, at a certain point can you sleep at night, will the lights be blaring through your window, will the noise be loud?”, she said. “I mean, at a certain point you have to weigh can you still live there?”

The Savannah Metropolitan Planning Commission will take up the rezoning petition at its meeting on September 29th.

MerchSource opens Effingham County facility

BLOOMINGDALE — “It only gets bigger from here.”Those words uttered by MerchSource CEO Carl Warschausky are impressive considering he cut the ribbon on a 1.1 million square foot distribution facility at Savannah Portside International Park on Monday.Warschausky predicted that 75 percent of MerchSource’s volume will pass through the new warehouse. MerchSource handles products for FAO Schwarz, Sharper Image and more.“The course that we set out on has been working beautifully,” Warschausky...

BLOOMINGDALE — “It only gets bigger from here.”

Those words uttered by MerchSource CEO Carl Warschausky are impressive considering he cut the ribbon on a 1.1 million square foot distribution facility at Savannah Portside International Park on Monday.

Warschausky predicted that 75 percent of MerchSource’s volume will pass through the new warehouse. MerchSource handles products for FAO Schwarz, Sharper Image and more.

“The course that we set out on has been working beautifully,” Warschausky said. “We had a play in 2019 to roughly double our sales in five years. As of right now, we have doubled our sales in three years.”

MerchSource realized a larger East Coast presence was necessary to achieve its sales objective. It is based in California.

“The site’s unique location with frontage on Interstate 16 has garnered a lot of attention over the years from large-scale operations,” said Jessica Hood, ECIDA vice president. “In 2017, the first company, then known as Port Fresh Logistics and now Americold, announced a 100,000 square foot cold storage facility, which is located across the interstate from where we are now.”

The Effingham County Industrial Development (ECIDA) acquired 1,500 acres for Savannah Portside International Park in 2005. It immediately began preparing the site for development.

In 2020, the ECIDA partnered with Panattoni Development Company, an international real estate developer, to development 160 acres of speculative space at the park. Less than a year later, the partners, in conjunction with the Georgia Department of Economic Development, Georgia EMC and the Georgia Ports Authority secured MerchSource for the 1.1 million square foot building that was still under construction.

“On behalf of the (ECIDA) board and staff, we sincerely appreciate everyone’s hard work to make this project a success and we thank MerchSource for choosing Effingham County for your new distribution facility,” Hood said. “We appreciate your commitment to our community, the investment that you’ve made here, and the 90 full-time jobs that you will be creating here.

Hood offered additional thanks to the Effingham County Board of Commissioners for assisting with the deal.

“We couldn’t be here without the hard work that you have put in over the years,” she said.

District 3 Commissioner Jamie DeLoach, the board’s vice chairman, briefly addressed an audience that included MerchSource employees and local officials. County

“It’s really good to see the uniforms, to see the employees out here,” DeLoach said. “This is when our plans come together. As our community partners, we work with our local industrial development authority, and they work with other partners — and this is what happens.

“This is a great facility. We look forward to having a great relationship with MerchSource.”

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